William
Marter


WILLIAM ROSCOE WOOD MARTER was born on the 30th of November, 1899 to Richard Smith Marter and his wife, the former Lillie M. Wood. He was an only child.

The 1900 and 1910 Censuses shows the Marters living at 412 Kaighn Avenue, the home of William Marter's maternal grandparents, William and Emma Wood. Richard S. Marter was working as a milk dealer in 1900 and as a driver when the 1906 Camden City Directory was compiled. By 1910 he had joined the Camden Fire Department, and was still serving there as late as April of 1930.

The Marters were still living at 412 Kaighn Avenue when the 1914 City Directory was published. When William Marter registered for the draft in September of 1918, the family had moved to 463 Mechanic Street. William Marter was living with his parents and had gone to work as shipfitter at the Pusey & Jones shipyard in Gloucester City. The 1924 City Directory shows the same information. The 1927 City Directory shows that he had joined the Camden Police Department. His father was still with the Fire Department as late as April of 1930.


By April of 1930, when the census was taken, William Marter had married and bought a home at 3060 Mickle Street in East Camden, where he lived with his wife Elsie and daughter Jeanne. A son, Richard B. Marter, was born afterwards.

William Marter's parents were still living on Mechanic Street in 1931. William Marter's mother passed in September of 1933, and father Richard S. Marter appears to have gone on prior to 1940.

The 1947 Camden City Directory lists William Marter as a sergeant in the Detective Bureau of the Camden Police Department. He was still living on Mickle Street at that time. By 1949 William Marter had left Camden's police force. He is not listed in any Camden County New Jersey Bell Telephone Directories.

Richard B. Marter served as a member of the Camden Fire Department for over 31 years, retiring as a Captain in May of 1999.


Camden Courier-Post * February 9, 1933

COPS AND FIREMEN WILL ELECT TODAY
Herbert Bott Is Unopposed for Presidency of Camden Association

The Camden Police and Firemen's Association will hold election of officers today at its headquarters, 1175 Whitman Avenue, from 1:00 PM to 9:00 PM.

Herbert Bott is unopposed for re-election as president. William Thorn is unopposed to replace Richard Middleton for financial secretary and Walter Vecander is unopposed for the new post of assistant financial secretary. All these are police officers.

The police trustees will be named from the following nine candidates: William Marter, George Ward, William Britner, Joseph Shreeve, William Schriber, Joseph Mardino, Joseph Dunnett, Leon Feltz and Russell Young. Two police sergeant-at-arms will be chosen from among Stanley Wirtz, Harry Cattell, Joseph Schultz and George Clayton.

Three candidates are seeking the post of vice president, which goes to a fireman. They are William Spencer, Charles Edwards and Albert Dukes. Warren Rich, a fireman, is slated to succeed himself as recording secretary and Winfield Leviseur is unopposed for the new post of assistant recording secretary, which goes to a fireman.

Four fireman trustees will be chosen from ten candidates. They are Charles Cook, Henry Baumgartel, Walter Eastlack, Arthur Batten, William Getner, William Toy, Lawrence Newton, James Young, Russell Anderson and William Taylor. Three firemen are seeking two posts as sergeants-at-arms. They are William Judge, John Mulligan and Furman Price.


Camden Courier-Post * February 10, 1933

BOTT CHOSEN HEAD OF POLICEMEN, FIREMEN
Spencer Wins 3-Corner Fight for Vice-President of Association

Lauded by the members for his splendid work in behalf of the club, Herbert Bott, a  patrolman attached to the Third Police District, last night was re-elected president of the Camden Police and Firemen's Association.

The praise was heaped upon the patrolman following announcement that he had received 107 of 110 votes cast in yesterday's balloting. He was unopposed for reelection.

In a three-cornered fight, William Spencer, a fireman, was elected vice president of the association. He received 73 votes. His opponents were Charles Edwards, given 12 votes, and Albert Dukes, 18 votes. Both are firemen.

Others unopposed for office were: William Thorn, financial secretary; Walter Vecander, assistant financial secretary; Warren Rich, recording secretary, and Winfield Leviseur, assistant recording secretary. The last two are firemen while the first two are policemen.

Lieutenant George Ward, Patrolman William Marter, and Firemen William Taylor, William Getner, James Young and Lawrence Newton were elected to the board of trustees.

Sergeants-at-arms named were Stanley Wirtz and George Clayton, police, and William Judge and John Mulligan, firemen. All had opposition.

After the ballots had been counted William H. Iszard, former assemblyman, appeared on behalf of the Elks Crippled Kiddies Committee, and asked police to support the wrestling show to be staged by that group February 13..


Camden Courier-Post
Evening Courier - September 17, 1934

 ORLANDO ASSUMES CHARGE OF VICE WAR
Prosecutor Directs Cleanup and Pushes Probe of Feitz Murder

 Prosecutor Samuel P. Orlando today dropped all other duties and took personal charge of the drive to rid Camden city and county of vice.

Orlando announced he would concentrate his activities in the drive against crime and te solution of the murder of Detective William T. Feitz Jr., slain two weeks ago in a South Camden disorderly house.

“I hope to gather enough evidence to go before the grand jury within the next week or 10 days,” Orlando said. “The Feitz murder investigation is progressing and I hope to have sufficient facts before me soon that will enable is to apprehend the slayers.”

Weekend developments in the general drive against crime resulted in the raiding of at least 30 gambling houses, illicit saloons, and alcohol stills with police spurred to feverish activity by Mayor Roy R. Stewart’s probe of the department, which he said will end this week, unless new evidence develops to extend it.

Blair Release Sought

 Meanwhile, Edward V. Martino, council for Michael Tenerelli, alias Mickey Blair, former boxer, announced his intention of appearing before Judge Frank F. Neutze today to apply for a writ of habeas corpus to effect the release of Blair, held as the “key witness” in the Feitz slaying.

“Prosecutor Orlando had demanded $10,000 for the release of Blair,” Martino said. “That amount is ridiculously high. When I asked Orlando why his office required such excessive bail, he told me ‘I have to back up the police’”.

 Martino said he would demand the prosecutor show in court the reason for the “unreasonable demand”.

Lieutenant Walter Welch, new commander of the Second Police District, conducted an intensive cleanup of his bailiwick over Saturday and Sunday, raiding 25 alleged violators of liquor and gambling laws.

Aided by state alcohol agents, police raiders headed by Lieutenant George Frost uncovered two 50-gallon stills and a bullet-riddled target in two apparently abandoned houses at 531 and 533 South 2nd Street. An advance “tip-off” had caused operators of the stills to flee, police said.

Two alcohol “drops”, believed operated by the proprietors of the South 2nd Street houses, were visited but found empty.

Numbers Baron Nabbed

Marshall Howard, 33, of 1912 Derousse avenue, Delair, described by Prosecutor Orlando as a ‘big shot’ in the Pennsauken and Camden numbers racket, was arrested Saturday when he visited the court house to make inquiries concerning an unnamed woman under arrest as a numbers writer.

A short while later, at the request of Orlando, Lucille Barber, 35, of 8302 Park avenue, Pennsauken township, and John Barnes, 26, of 7508 Pleasant avenue, Pennsauken township, both colored, were arrested as numbers writers.

It was reported at Pennsauken township police headquarters that the pair was wanted in connection with the case against Howard.

Both were held in $1000 bail for the grand jury.

Those who were held without bail as material witnesses in the Feitz case are Cornelius Murphy, 50, of 239 Sycamore Street, doorkeeper in the establishment; Edward Grapatin, 32, of 246 Kaighn Avenue; Joseph McKenna, 31, of 1404 Broadway; Katherine Lougheed, 32, of 626 Pine Street; Edna Butler, 33, colored, of 1122 South 2nd Street, and Joan Stein, 24, of Philadelphia. Six others were released in their own recognizance as material witnesses.

They are Sam Silverman, 34, of 325½ Kaighn Avenue; Edward Gorba, 20, who has supplied police with most of the information about Feitz’ death, and Gorba’s brother, Henry, 19, of 17 South 21st Street; Joseph McDonald, 20, of 1605 South 9th Street; Edith Miller, 28, colored, of 205 Sycamore Street, and George Martorano, 25, of 532 West Street.

Aided by Patrolmen William Marter and Carmin Fuscellaro Sr., Lieutenant Welch conducted a series of raids Saturday night and yesterday morning. The saloon of Mary Niewinski, at 400 Mechanic Street, was raided early yesterday and two customers arrested.

Lieutenant Welch Leads Raiders

Welch, who took over the duties Lieutenant Ralph Bakley when the latter was suspended by Mayor Stewart yesterday, declared he was seeking violators of the city’s Sunday closing ordinance, which states that places selling liquor must close “between the hours of 2:00 AM Sunday and 7:00 AM Monday.”

Nickelson Lehger, 49, of 311 Somerset Street, Gloucester and George Burkett, 38, of 340 Liberty Street, were arrested in Mrs. Niewinski's place. Welch said they were shooting craps on the bar. Mrs. Niewinski was released in $500 bail as proprietor and the men were released in $100 bail each as frequenters.

The three were arrested on Welch's second visit yesterday, he said. The first time he ordered Mrs. Niewinski to close her place, but on his second visit, he found the men gambling, he said.

Welch and his squad visited a house at 1903 South 6th Street, reputedly operated by William Tansky, 33. Tansky, charged with violating the closing ordinance, was released in $500 bail as proprietor, and Edward Krown, 65, of 1705 South 4th Street; Edward Judd, 41, of 721 Ferry Avenue; and William Sampey, of 729 South 10th Street, charged with being frequenters, were released in $100 bail.

Saloon Raided

A saloon operated by Helen Brass, 52, at 1067  Ferry Avenue, scene of an unsuccessful holdup attempt Friday, was next raided. Frank Dipeto, 42, of 829 Sylvan Street; Edward Podyezmek, 47, of 783 South 2nd Street; Joseph Orbin, 53, of 963 Florence Street; and Angelo Del Rossi, 70, of 430 Emerald Street, were arrested and held as frequenters. Mrs. Brass was charged with violating the closing ordinance.

The establishment of Mitchell Lambert, 26, at 1427 South 9th Street was next visited. Lambert, held as proprietor was released in $500 bail. Florian Shepecarter, 36, of 2811 Yorkship Road; John Glenn, 35, of 52 Courtland Street; Paul Korzewszeski, 34, of 1041 Atlantic Avenue; and William Lanning, 37, of 1149 South 9th Street were all nabbed as frequenters.

At 1025 South 2nd Street, Welch and his men found four colored men and women, and Meg Mack, 38, colored, who was charged with being proprietor. The four gave their names as Alvin Mack, of the South 2nd Street address; Howard Elinor, 30, of 215 Chestnut Street; and Alice Wells and Emily Robinson, 28, of the same address. All were held for hearing today.

Welch declared he was unable to enter some of the places visited because he did not hold warrants. He said he would procure warrants today and return to several of the places. In the other instances where raids were made, Welch did not reveal the addresses or names.

Welch announced last night he is not seeking “personal notoriety” through his activities, but is merely doing his duty as a police officer. He declared “the lid has been clamped on the second District and will stay on.”

Mayor Stewart commended Welch's activities, and declared he will recommend suspension of liquor licenses in all the places where violations were uncovered.

State Police Stage Raid

Thirteen were arrested by a detail of state troopers from the Mt. Ephraim and Berlin barracks when a raid was staged on the home of Dominick Melchiore, 28, at Cedar Avenue, Blenheim.

Melchiore was charged with operating a gambling establishment. Arraigned before Justice of the peace Charles Jackson at Runnemede, he was fined $5 and costs. Charles Darpino, 26, a Camden man among those arrested, gave his address as 306 Chestnut Street. He and the 11 others were fined $3 each and costs.

The police raiders who uncovered the two stills and riddled target at 533 South 2nd Street also visited the home of Charles Auletto, 20 South 2nd Street. Auletto, charged with selling illegal liquor, denied knowledge of the stills, but was held on $1000 bail for the grand jury by Police Judge J. Harry Switzer.

Two men were fined $25.00 each last night in Pennsauken township police court by Recorder George E. Yost on slot machine gambling charges.

Arthur Pipher, 25, of 2248 North 36th Street, Camden, was charged with placing slot machines in various stores for gambling purposes, and Edward Friedberg, operator of a medicine store at Park and Union Avenues, Pennsauken was charged with possession of a slot machine. Friedberg announced he would appeal his conviction.

It was testified that he offered merchandise as prizes in conjunction with operation of the device.


Camden Courier-Post * February 1, 1938

Made Detective

WILLIAM MARTER

Camden patrolman who has been shifted from the office of Commissioner Mary Kobus to the Detective Bureau, Police Chief Arthur Colsey announced last night. Marter will become an acting detective.

 


Camden Courier-Post - February 4, 1938

City Police Praised at Fete
Honoring Acting Lieutenant Bott

Camden police and firemen gathered last night to pay honor to Acting Lieutenant Herbert Bott, retiring president of the Policemen and Firemen's Association, heard their highest superiors make these statements:

Commissioner Mary W. Kobus, director of Public Safety, declared she had heard stories about the policemen "taking" but that she wanted to say "that the entire force was honest and she was proud to say that it was as good, as honest and efficient as any in. the United States."

Mayor George E. Brunner asserted "the city had gone to ____ before the three New Deal commissioners took charge, and they had brought order out of chaos, collected taxes so thoroughly that on January 1, 1939, the policemen and firemen will be given back the last five percent reduction that had been made in their pay."

Bott, who has been at the head of the association for the past five years, retires because, as he stated, he felt he could not give such service as he felt he had rendered in the past. The affair was held at Kenney's and the ranking officials of the police and fire departments were on hand, together with guests from other parts of the state.

  
LIEUT. HERBERT BOTT
who quit as president of the Camden Policemen and Firemen's Association after five years' service, and who was feted at Kenney's last night and presented with cash donations.




Wallace Lauds Men

Bruce A. Wallace was toastmaster, and he emphasized the remarks of Commissioner Kobus as to "the honesty of the men."

"When you got that 30 percent reduction in pay,” said Wallace, "I know how you came to my office, worrying about how you would meet your building and loans, how you would pay various debts that you owed, and I know that some of you even gave up your homes, because you couldn't afford to pay for them longer. That would never have happened if you were doing any 'put and-take stuff'."

Mrs. Kobus started with a tribute to Bott, for his own efficiency as a policeman and his fighting qualities as shown in the battles he made for his brother policemen.

 “I knew Herb Bott," she said, "before I got into the department but once in there my sweet dream changed to a nightmare, because every day Bott was there with a delegation wanting something done for the policemen, or asking that something be not done to them.

"We have gone through stormy times together, through strikes and labor troubles and of course I have always found out, through others, naturally that 'the police are always wrong.' I have told the employers where they were wrong, and told the strikers that the police could not have abused them or wronged them because they belonged to an association of their own, fighting for the things that the policemen and the firemen felt that they wanted.

Citizens Gave Praise 

"I hadn't been four weeks in the department before I thought every­body in Camden was affected by 'letter writingitis.' But after four weeks the other kind of letters began to come in, and the police were being given the credit which they had deserved and which they had won for themselves.

"And the longer I am in the department the prouder I am of the police and the fire departments of the city of Camden. I am proud of every policeman and of every fireman in both departments. I have been out at·1.30 a. m. and heard a call come for the car in which I was riding, and in one minute and a half that car was at the scene, in two minutes there was another and in four minutes a half a dozen cars had appeared on the scene.

"I want to say for the men of the police department that nowhere in the United States is there a more honest or more faithful group of men.

"I hear a lot of talk about policemen, I hear lots of talk of how they are 'taking,' but I also want to say that I haven't found one yet who wasn't honest and to prove it crime today in Camden is at its lowest ebb.

"Crime today in Camden has been lowered 40 to 60 percent, and I say to anybody who wants to know that you couldn't have had this condition unless Camden was guarded by an honest, efficient police department.

"That crime in Camden is at its lowest ebb is due entirely to the vigilance of the police department, and to its loyalty to duty. I want to pay tribute to Chief Colsey, to Babe Clayton, to Herb Bott and the other officers of the department for having the police department where it can be proudly acclaimed as without a superior in the whole United States."

Mayor Brunner, after paying his tribute to a personal friend, Herb Bott, declared "Mrs. Kobus is your superior but I'm the man who has to find the money to pay you. And that hasn't been any easy job, I can tell you, as the tax collector's job in any community is a tough one."

"I want to say that things in Camden have gone to ___ in the past, and until the three New Deal Commissioners took charge of affairs, things continued in just that manner. And that we have given an honest, efficient administration is the thought of the average citizen of Camden today.

Promises Pay Restoration

"When we first came into power the people thought they had to pay no taxes. I say now that we have collected the taxes as they should have been collected in the past and as they will be collected in the future.

"Camden doesn't need any new taxes. We have been successful in collecting the taxes because we made those who could pay to pay. The men we put in front, for the first collection of taxes, were the politicians who thought they stood in a favored group and could get away with it.

"I want to assure you policemen that on January 1, 1939, I feel sure that we'll be able to give you back the last five percent that we had to take from you, when things were left in such a shape for us that we could not do anything else.

"People are responding to our tax collections, and the people feel that we are giving them 100 cents for a dollar and that's the reason.

"We have no favorites on the tax rolls. We saw to it that the politicians headed the list of those who were the first to pay, and we've given the little fellow a chance. We've let him pay by the week, or the month or anyway that would suit him best, because we believe that the little fellow is entitled to his own homestead, and we're going to see that he keeps it, but those who can afford to pay and wont are going to be made to pay."

Carlton W. Rowand related that his father, a former police official, had recently, told his son that "the police department today was the best in the history of Camden,"

Surrogate Frank B. Hanna also added his tribute to the department and to the guest of honor.

"The spirit of the police department”, Hanna said, "is shown to no better advantage than in the manner your association aids the underprivileged children of this city. I know, too, that whenever a committee is formed for a job to be done for the men in the department, Herb Bott jumps into action and does his level best for his associates.”

N. J. Crime Bill 10 Millions

Harry B. Gourley, of Paterson, president of the State Police Beneficial Association, declared that crime was costing the state of New Jersey $10,000,000 every year, and that the crime bill of the nation was more than $15,000,000,000.

He asked co-operation in crime prevention and declared that "any attempt to break down the morale of the police was wrong, and the way in which it was easiest broken down was when you dip into the pay check."

He cited numerous instances of the heroism of the policemen, and asked that every citizen stand squarely behind the men in the matter of pensions.

Commissioner Harold W. Bennett also lauded the guest and the police department, as did Harry Wilkers, who succeeds Bott as president of the association and Robert Wonstetler, who becomes delegate to the state convention to replace Bott.

Mrs. Emma Shriver, retiring president of the Ladies Auxiliary, presented Bott with a check, while Wallace gave him the gift of his associates, 50 silver dollars. Mrs. Bott was remembered with flowers.

Willard Schriver was chairman of the committee having the dinner in charge, and associated with him were Charles Cook, Arthur Batten, Maurice F. O'Brien, William Marter, Edward Leonard, Mrs. Schriver, Mrs. Anna Gleason and Mrs. William McGrath.


Camden Courier-Post - February 18, 1938

MRS. SELINA TAYLOR, 92, DIES; RELATIVES SOUGHT

Mrs. Selina Taylor, 92, was found dead in a bed room yesterday on the, second floor of 406 Vine street, by William Pedrick. Mrs., Taylor had been living with the Pedrick family for the past four years. 

Coroner Charles T, Murray issued a certificate of death due to a heart condition. Detective William Marter, investigating Mrs. Taylor's death, said he is seeking two nieces, reported to be residents of South Camden. Marter said he did not know their names.

Funeral services will be held at 11 a. m. tomorrow at the funeral home of Joseph H. Murray and Son, 408 Cooper street. 


Camden Courier-Post - February 18, 1938

CHILDREN ARE BLAMED FOR VARNISH DAUBING

Daubing of the windows of four houses and a store in the 600 block of North Sixth street with varnish was laid to children by detectives today. 
Complaints were made by Frank Pecosca, 631; Joseph Edwards, 633; Harry Ross, 635; Elizabeth Chapman, 637, and Louis Passero, 639, North Sixth street

Detectives William Marter arid Gus Fortune said the owners of the house could give no explanation of the act. The sleuths asked all if they were involved in labor difficulties and received negative replies. 


CAMDEN COURIER-POST * FEBRUARY 28, 1938

M.F. Middleton Felled by Gas In House Here
Former City Commissioner Found Unconscious in Old Home

With gas flowing from a pipe detached from a gas range, former City Commissioner Melbourne F. Middleton, Jr., was found unconscious in the kitchen of his former home at 538 Cooper street early Saturday night.

Middleton was reported last night to still be in a critical condition at West Jersey Hospital, where he was taken. The Camden Fire Department First Aid Squad worked over him for an hour at the house in a vain effort to revive him.

Middleton, a former president of the Philadelphia Stock Exchange, and one time city councilman, was found by a son, C. Barry Middleton, and a friend, John Williams Rossell, who lives with the Middletons on Laurel road, Moorestown. Middleton was clad in overalls and two large pipe wrenches were lying on the kitchen floor near him.

Young Middleton said his father told his family he intended to take up some linoleum in the kitchen of his former home. Middleton first went to his office Saturday and then to St. Paul's Episcopal Church to a service. From there he was traced to his former home, which is owned by him.

When Middleton failed to return home for dinner at the usual time Saturday his son and Rossell decided to search for him. When young Middleton discovered his father's plight he notified police. Patrolmen Frank Cavallo, Henry Lutz, Walter Vecander and George Getley responded in radio cars and gave first aid until the fire department squad arrived.

The firemen worked on the former commissioner one hour with an inhalator before ordering his removal to the hospital, where they continued to work on Middleton for another hour but were unable to revive him. Hospital physicians continued working on him without success. They said his condition was critical.

Gas Man Called

At 4 p. m. Saturday the family living next to Middlemen's home telephoned Public Service that gas was coming from the house. Public Service sent a man to investi­gate but he was unable to get into the house.

Young Middleton and Rossell said they reached the house at 6.17 p. m.

While he was a member of the first city commission Middleton was director of finance but never missed responding to all alarms of fire. He was a member of the fire committee while serving in City Council as a member from the Second ward. In that capacity he also answered all alarms.

Members of the Firemen's First Aid Squad responding to the call were Deputy Chief William R. Harring, Hosemen Christopher Moll, William Spencer, Harry Haines, Russell Anderson, William Harry Deitz and Nelson Andrews.

City Detectives Benjamin Simon, Joseph Mardino and William Marter are investigating the cause.  


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