TO PROTECT AND SERVE

CAMDEN NJ
POLICE DEPARTMENT
1962 REPORT



The Police Department of the City of Camden NJ was founded in 1871, and has roots going back long before that.

In 1961, the Department published its first Annual Report. Thanks to former Camden police officer Frank Crissey, who served from 1962 until his retirement in 1987, and his wife Jeanne, for making the 1962 Report available.

Phil Cohen
dvrbs@comcast.net


CLICK ON THE PICTURES FOR ENLARGED & ENHANCED VIEWS

Front Cover

Page 1

ALFRED R. PIERCE, MAYOR, City of Camden

Native of Camden and lifelong resident.....educated in public school system.....attended Rutgers South Jersey and received law degree from Dickinson School of Law.....served US Army Air Force in World War II as combat pilot credited with 51  missions.....rose to rank of captain.....married with three children.....former attorney Camden City Board of Education .....elected to city commission on coalition ticket in 1959-  became Mayor under the new form of mayor-council government in July 1961

Page 2

Colonel EDWIN ALLEN BEDELL
DIRECTOR of Public Safety

Retired 1961, US Army Colonel.....graduate of Middlebury College .....formerly Director Public Works, appointed Director of Public Safety June, 1962.....attended numerous military schools for administration, including Armed Forces Staff College..... married, father of one child.....proficient in a number of foreign languages.

Page 3

WILLIAM H. NEALE, Chief of Police

Lifelong resident of city..... educated in public school system
.....appointed to police department in 1940.....promoted to
detective in 1946 after service with US Army Criminal 
Investigation Division (CID)..... while in CID attended famed
Scotland Yard School.....also attended numerous police schools
..... elevated to sergeant in 1951.....to lieutenant in 1957 handling detective division.... promoted to Inspector in 1960
.... appointed Chief in August 1960..... married father of
three children.....Vice-President South Jersey Chiefs of Police Association.

Page 3

Colonel Edwin Bedell
Director of Public Safety
City of Camden
New Jersey

Dear Director:

It is with pleasure that I present herewith the Annual 
Report of the Camden City Police Department for the year 1962.

In this report we have endeavored to present, in as concise form as possible, all essential information covering the work and accomplishments of this Department during the year 1962. Utiliz- ing pictures and graphs, we have aimed to present a clear and realistic concept of the various units of our Department, each of which plays a vital part in providing the citizens of Camden with efficient and effective police service.

An interesting segment of the report points out the overall decrease in the crime index pattern and indicates a noticeable increase in vice arrests. The crime rate in Camden is 5.2% under the previous year, 1961. The national average has increased approximately 97% from the same year.

We are constantly endeavoring to improve and modernize our various operations and follow closely all new techniques and scientific achievements. These are adopted after proven worth.

We further trust that the attainments herein will merit your confidence and approval.

 

Very truly yours,

<Signed>

WILLIAM H. NEALE,
Chief of
Police.

Page 5

Page 6

Page 7

Page 8

Page 9

Page 10

THE HISTORY OF THE CITY OF CAMDEN AND ITS POLICE DEPARTMENT 

The City of Camden was established in 1773 by Jacob Cooper, great-grandson of William Cooper, one of the original colonial settlers and a close friend of William Penn. It was named for Charles Pratt, Earl of Camden and Lord Chancellor of England in 1776, who was a firm friend of the American colonies during the American Revolution

At first Camden existed only as a small settlement of houses near the ferries, which were the gateway from New Jersey to Philadelphia.  

With the growth in population and industry, Camden was incorporated as a city in 1828 with an area of 3.9 square miles, or 2,496 acres. Its population was 1,143. The city was made up of five groups or villages; Cooper's Point was William Cooper's Ferry, Kaighn's Point was Kaighnstown, Pinchtown was the section along the shore below Federal Street, Dogwoodtown was a cluster of houses at Federal Street near the Cooper River Creek, Camden proper was the area from North Sixth Street to the Delaware River. A mayor and five councilmen were elected by the people to serve as a local governing body. It was the responsibility of this governing body to restrain and arrest the unruly and to maintain Quarters Session Court to try and punish law violators. The first city jail was erected at 418 Federal Street.

This type of police protection remained until the Charter of 1851. Under this Charter, City Marshals acted as Chiefs of Police and were elected annually by the people.  

The following have served as City Marshals:

 

1851  John W. Potts
1852  James H. Lowery
1853  Peter S. Elliott
1854-56 Henry Belstering
1857-58  John W. Hoagland  
1859-60 

Edmund Shaw  
1861-62 Timothy Middleton
1863   Samuel Conrow
1864-66 John W. Campbell
1867-69 J. Kelly Brown
1870 Claudius Bradshaw

 

The police force achieved a measure of formal organization in December, 1868, when uniforms were first issued. Shortly afterward, the city fathers recognized the need for a full time police department. In 1871, under a new charter, the chief of police was appointed and held office at the pleasure of the mayor. The police department then consisted of the chief of police and 25 patrolmen. The chief received the grandiose salary of $950 per annum. A patrolman's salary was $750 per year. They also received $50 per year in equal payments of $25 each on the first day of July and January, to be applied to the purchase of the uniforms. This remained the uniform allowance until 1959 when it rose to $150 per year.  

The following have served as Chiefs of Police of the Camden City Police Department.

   

1871-73 Daniel W. Curlis

1874 William H. Hemsing

1875-76 Daniel W. Curlis

1877-79 Charles F. Daubmann

1880-85 Josiah Matlack

1886 Harry H. Franks

1887-93 Samuel Dodd

1894 William H. Davis

1895-98 Samuel Dodd

1899-06 John Foster

1907-21 E.A. Gravenor

1922-26 James E. Tatem*  

1927-30 Louis H. Stehr Jr.*

1931 Acting Chief, Major Charles V. Dickinson

1932-33 Acting Chief John W. Golden

1934-39 Arthur Colsey

1939-41 Acting Chief Ralph Bakley

1942-48 George Frost

1948-49 Acting Chief Samuel Johnson

1949-60 Gustav Koerner

1960 Donald Watson (temporary)

1960-1962 William H. Neale  

Statistics and Records Systems, a Detective Division, modern Traffic Bureau, new Communications System, K-9 Corps, and an ultra-new Tactical Force were instituted.

Today the Police Department of the City of Camden is considered as modern as any police in the United States. Several foreign nations have used Camden as a pattern in organizing their own departments. Future plans call for a new Police Building which will include an up-to-date crime laboratory, more equipment for communications, a jail and courtroom and all Division and Central Headquarters under one roof. Thus all subdivisions of the Police Department will be centralized for greater efficiency and better service to the public.

* The booklet as originally published misspelled Chief Curlis' and Chief Tatem's names, and omitted Chief Stehr.

Page 11 through 14

Page 15

Page 16

RECEIVING SPECIAL ORDERS
Page 17

STREET REPORT FROM CITIZENS
Page 17
Officer William "Bill" Haines

PATROL DIVISION

The Patrol Division 5 constantly on the alert to its prime
responsibility for the containment and control of law violators,
has met the rising crime trend by employing the latest techniques in modern police methods. Strategic deployment of tactical units was instituted to obtain maximum field strength and adequate coverage in areas of critical concern.

Within the Patrol structure is the efficient and effective K-9 Corps and the mobile Tactical Unit. These flexible arms of the Patrol force are available for duty in any locale where the need is indicated. Vice and spontaneous criminal action are their prime targets.

The City is divided into 10 Patrol Sectors. It is within these sectors that the four primary units -- the radio patrol cars, patrol wagons, foot patrolmen, and plainclothes operators of the Patrol Division are assigned.

The City consists of 207 miles of streets, 12 miles of water front, and a population of 117,159. In addition, being an industrial city, Camden daily accommodates thousands of transients and commuters. The range of activities handled by the personnel of the Patrol Division extends from simple complaints to homicides.

In addition to routine patrol, services, inspections and hospital runs comprise a large portion of the daily work load. 

Page 18

Page 19 & Page 20

When the booklet was put together, pages 17 and 18 were duplicated, and pages 19 and 20 were omitted. If anyone has a version of this booklet with these pages included PLEASE contact me by e-mail.

Phil Cohen   


Initial Investigation
Page 21

Left: Officer William "Bill" Reeves,
second officer unknown


Page 21

Roll Call and Inspection
Page 21

Front row from left: William Kelly, John Ferry, Clyde Waters, Andrew Monroe, Cecil Picou, Isaiah Pitts, Sergeant Joseph Troestel

Middle Row: Standing behind Waters and Monroe (with mustache) is Fontaine Shockley, unknown, unknown, Freddie Dobson, Horace "Speed" Wilkerson, Frank Crissey is at far right, holding a book.

Back row Starting at the window: Jerome Spratley, Arnold Cream,  Danny Domerowski and at far left Art Lewandowski


Responding to Burglar Alarm
Page 21

Hospital Run
Page 21

Lost Child Return Home
Page 21

POLICE HEADQUARTERS

This integral part of the Patrol Division is maintained on a 24-hour-a-day basis the year around. On duty is a sergeant, jailer, and a matron. In addition, an administrative lieutenant is assigned to Headquarters on the day tour. Prisoners are received, booked, and processed. Complaints are accepted and warrants issued when necessary. Nine cells for temporary detention are maintained for prisoners until their bail is posted or the case adjudicated. In 1962, 5880 prisoners were handled.

The Sergeants assigned to Headquarters also act as information specialists for all inquiries the public makes to Department.

Lost children and complaints make up the bulk of the Headquarters business.

Page 22

Headquarters & Complaint Desk
Page 22

At left, seated: Peter Paull


Jail Security Report
Page 22

WARRANT SQUAD

In 1962 a Warrant Squad was established. It operates directly out of Police Headquarters but is a part of the Patrol Division. The prime function of this two-man plainclothes team is to serve major crime and out-of-town warrants. These include warrants declared non-serviceable and returned from other police units. The Warrant Squad began operations on July 6, 1962 on an experimental basis and has since been made permanent. Frequent tips and numerous odd-hour duty stints are required from the members of the Warrant Squad in the performance of their assignments. Since its inception, the Warrant Squad has processed a total of 983 warrants and has effected a total of 195 arrests.

Page 23

CANINE CORPS

This integral part of the patrol Division was formed in 1960. It now consists of the carefully selected men who have shown an aptitude in dog handling. During the past year, the K-9 Division handled a number of complaints, from homicides to ordinary disturbances. The K-9 patrols respond on all calls where the need for this specialized police service is indicated. They have proved their effectiveness in burglary investigations, crowed disturbances, prowler detection, and as a psychological tool in genera crime prevention. Their renown has grown to such an extent that K-9 demonstrations are constantly in demand by citizen's groups. In 1962 a total of 34 such programs were handled by this unit.

Page 24

K-9 Team Making Apprehension
Page 24

Ray Paradise & George Mahoney


Policeman and Dog
Partner and Friend
Page 24

Dave Newberry


Page 25

Ed Hahn Jr. & Ray Paradise


AUXILIARY POLICE

Organized in 1961, this civilian arm of the Police Department numbers approximately 65 dedicated citizens. The personnel work directly with the members of the various police divisions. Trained in a variety of police subjects, including criminal law, laws of arrest, basic crime detection, traffic duties and first aid, they operate mainly in the Patrol Division. Their value is apparent on heavy-traffic weekends and during emergencies, such as floods and fires. Recently, they have accepted the responsibility of operating a city ambulance for emergency hospital runs. all volunteers, they possess a high degree of esprit de corps and enthusiasm. 

Page 26

Page 26

Page 26

DETECTIVE DIVISION
Recovered Stolen Goods
Page 27

Statement Taken From Witness
Page 27

 unknown, John E. Opfer, unknown witness


Detective Reviewing Case and Evidence
Page 27

Detective Robert DePersia


DETECTIVE DIVISION

The Detective Division, composed of the Detective Bureau and the Juvenile Bureau 5 investigates crimes, recovers property, identifies and apprehends criminals and is concerned with the prevention and control of juvenile delinquency. Within the scope of the Detective Bureau proper falls these specialized categories: Crimes against the person; crimes against property; forgery; larceny of auto and missing person; general assignments. These categories are handled by special Homicide, Burglary, Robbery, Auto Theft, and Fraud Sections.

During 1962, the Camden Police Detective Bureau compiled a new record for cases solved. Its efficiency was also reflected in the amount of property recovered during the year. 

A Record number of cases were handled by the personnel assigned to the Detective Division. Close liaison was maintained with all other police sub-divisions and neighboring police agencies.

Missing persons investigations is also a responsibility of the Detective Division. Investigations of missing persons are always carried to a conclusion, regardless of any time factors. 

Page 28

Page 29

Safe Cracker at Work
Page 30

Dusting for Latent Fingerprints
Page 30

Page 30

At far right: Detective Vincent Buondanno


Suspect Taken To Detective Division For Further Investigation
Page 31

Officer Robert A. Uphaw Sr. (at left) with Officer Clyde Waters making an arrest.


Suspect At Booking Desk
Page 31

Seated behind desk: Dominic Palese


Suspect Processed For Positive Identification
Page 31

JUVENILE BUREAU

The Juvenile Bureau is an integral part of the Detective Division. Commanded by a Sergeant, it includes an operations sergeant and four detectives. The clerical duties are handled by a civilian clerk-stenographer. In 1962, the Juvenile Bureau handled a total of 939 complaints. There were 827 arrests.

COMPARISON

ARRESTS 1961 818 COMPLAINTS 1961 913

ARRESTS 1962 827 COMPLAINTS 1962 939

INCREASE 1.17% COMPOSITE INCREASE

The objective of this sub-division of the Detective Division is rehabilitation. In 1962, offenses committed by juveniles in Camden ranged from larceny to frauds and abortions. The most prominent offenses were disorderly conduct and malicious mischief. Investigations were also conducted into the activities of gangs.

Page 33

COMMUNICATIONS DIVISION

Communications is the heart and life-line of any modern police organization. During the past year Communications became a separate and independent Division, Headed by an Inspector, this Division has made rapid strides in providing the city with comprehensive communications services.

The Division is staffed by five police officers and numerous civilian operators on a 24 hour a day basis. The unit now operates completely separate from Fire Communications and has its own newly installed Gamewell Board, This is a police telegraph system. A new plan for the expeditious handling of all emergency calls including air raid alarms was put into effect last year. In 1962 a record number of complaints totalling 45,104 was handled by the personnel of the Police Communications Division, A 13 state hook-up via teletype is maintained on a full time basis to expedite any police action that may arise.

Page 33

Jail Security Report
Page 33

Jail Security Report
Page 34

Special Services

Among the many and varied duties of the Special Services Section are general administrative office functions and accompanying clerical responsibilities. They deal with the Police Department in general and include sick reports, injured on duty claims, requisitions for purchases, and attendance records. The varied nature of the unit's business is indicated in the following categorical breakdown:

LICENSES AND PERMITS:

a. bingo licenses 34
b. raffles licenses 47
c. permits to purchase revolvers 75
d. special permits for alcohol 79
e. parades 11
f. processions 8
g. block parties 13
h. pool room licenses 8
i. solicitors recorded 44
j. dance permits 14
k. taxi cab licenses 79
l. outdoor telephone booths
(locations checked)
22

In addition, the Special Services Section completed the following:

DEMONSTRATIONS AND TOURS

a. K-9 Demonstrations 34
b. Viewing of films 20
c. Tours of Police Department 4
d. Participation in Parades 2

RECRUIT CANDIDATE SCREENING:

A detailed questionnaire was prepared which assures the City of the best in applicants,

COMPLAINTS:

A number of complaints are received by various administrative departments in the City. In 1962 the Special Service Section handled 60 such complaints.

Page 35 & 36

Camden Police Color Guard
Page 36
At Pyne Point Junior High School

From Left: Edward Lewandowski,
Horace Wilkerson, Joseph McCann,
Bill Murray


Parade Assignment
Motorcycle cop might be Thomas Penn
Page 36

Police Bowling Team
Page 37

 At far left: Donald Still
At far right: Bill Murray


Police Softball Team
Page 37

Kneeling:
unknown, unknown, Bill Bennett

Standing, second from right:
Reginald "Sonny" Hilton


Annual Police & Firemen's Communion Breakfast
Page 37

NATIONAL POLICE WEEK

National Police Week was observed the week of May 13, 1962. All police bureaus staged an open-house. A bus with many police exhibits and mementos for inspection by the public toured various parts of the City under the guidance of two veteran police officers.

This week was designated by President Kennedy by writ of proclamation and was acclaimed by Governor Richard Hughes of the State of New Jersey as a week honoring Police Officers in the entire State.

Police equipment displayed to the public offered citizens an inside view of the operational aspects of the Department. The School Safety Patrol escorted hundreds of youngsters to a Phillies Baseball game in recognition of their service to the community.

Page 38

Police Display Open to Citizens
Page 38

Police Officials Inspecting
Police Display
Page 38

Chief Wiliiam "Bill" Neale, unknown, unknown


AWARDS, COMMENDATIONS AND PRESENTATION

One of the brightest tasks of a police administrator is the presentation of awards and commendations to members of this Department for meritorious achievements during the year. In 1962 Director Bedell and Chief Neale were privileged to present a total of 39 awards to various members of Camden's Police Department. They ranged from Certificates of Commendations and Certificates of Citations to Distinguished Service Awards. In addition one civilian received a Certificate of Citation for his assistance in the apprehension of a robbery suspect. The Camden Police Department was the recipient of an elaborate Narcotics Display Exhibit, This was presented by the Camden County Society in conjunction with the Temple University School of Pharmacy.

Page 39

Presentation of Awards
Page 39

From Left: Joseph "Joe Reno" Valeriano,
unknown, unknown,
Sergeant
Tom Kelly
Detective Nate Jones, unknown, 
Chief
William Neale,
Detective "Pete" Sunkett, unknown


Narcotic Display Presentation
Page 39

TRAINING UNIT

A necessity in any modern police organization is the Training Unit. Camden's is composed of one inspector and one sergeant. They are charged with the responsibility of training recruits and in-service personnel and providing special courses in modern police techniques. Among the programs offered in 1962 were:

1. Instruction in handling the Remington shotgun

2. Defensive and disarming methods

3. Techniques of arrest

4. Complete firearms program (pistol and shotgun)

5. Supervisory course for sergeants and lieutenants

6. Recruit training for recruits from Camden and Gloucester

Counties

7. Training bulletins for departmental distributions

8. Search and Seizure course.

Page 40

Pistol Training and Qualification
Page 40

Page 41

1962 Police Replacements

James
"Big Jimmy"
Anderson
Joseph
Aruanno
William
"Bill"
Busch
John
Cleary
Frank
Crissey
Phil
Ferrari
Albert C.
"Al"
George
Charles
"Charlie"
Guidotti
Ivan Holmes Robert "Bob" Hughes Al
Haines
Arnold
Jones
Horace
Wilkerson
Robert
Williams
Robert
"Shea"
Van Deventer
Edward
Michilak
Thanks to
Ray Massi, Frank Crissey,
& John Ciafrani
for help
in identifying these officers
Thomas Long Harry Harris

Filing Application

Sitting Don Watson
Standing Sgt Ed Yeager

Written Qualification Examination
Page 42

At left, from left:
James "Big Jimmy" Anderson, Inspector Watkins,
Sergeant Ed Yeager
At right: James "Big Jimmy" Anderson


Physical Fitness Examination Taking the Police Oath
Page 42
James "Big Jimmy" Anderson

Attending Police Academy

Frank Crissey in plaid shirt

Page 43

Officers from Camden and other towns.

Wearing suit and tie in lower right hand corner: Thomas Long
Blond Student in white shirt at left:
Al Haines
 
Upper left hand corner: Arnold Jones
Wearing Black Shirt, between Haines and Long: 
James "Big Jimmy" Anderson
Wearing checkered Shirt: Frank Crissey
Upper right hand corner: Edward Michilak
Wearing striped shirt, between Crissey and Michilak: Phil Ferrari

 


Issuing of
Police Revolver and Equipment
Page 43
Big Jimmy Anderson & Inspector Watkins

Assigned to Patrol Duty
Page 43

Traffic Division Personnel Awaiting Assignment

Page 44

From Left: Joel White, Lou Walls, Horace Wilkerson Sr., Unknown, unknown, unknown, Paul Skeens, unknown, Vince Levecchio,  David Hodosheff, Anthony Martino


Reporting Traffic Condition
Page 44

Joel White


Traffic Control
Page 44

Accident Investigation
Page 44

Motorcycle Patrol
Page 44

TRAFFIC DIVISION

One of the busiest of all line units within the Camden Police Department. Its problem is multiplied by the general congestion of Camden's city streets. The density of Camden's population also increases the work-load of the Traffic Division. Among some of the units of Camden's Traffic Division are the Radar Squad, School Safety Patrol, Abandoned Vehicles Unit, Foot Traffic, Motorcycle Enforcement, Accident Investigation, Traffic Engineering, Special Events and a Records Section.

A total of 31 persons are assigned to the Traffic Division. In 1962, a record number of accidents was reported and handled by the Camden Police Department. Responsibility for maintaining records and statements is with the Records Section of the Traffic Division. Last year 3,283 auto accident reports were handled by the Camden Police. In addition, 12 deaths by auto were investigated by the Traffic Bureau, and arrests were made as a result.

Page 45

IDENTIFICATION BUREAU 

Gathering Physical Evidence

Confiscate Weapon Display
Page 46

At left: unknown
At right:  Inspector Watkins, Joseph McComb Jr. (holding gun)


Tools of the Police Profession Confiscated Weapon Display
Page 46

RECORDS AND IDENTIFICATION DIVISION

Consisting of Central Records, Identification, Archives, Statistical Unit, Evidence and Property, this Division's primary functions is to service other Divisions in the Police Department. The Identification Bureau is open on a 24-hour-a-day cycle. Among it's assignments are the processing and storing of evidence; searching of crime scenes; distribution of the Daily Bulletin; maintenance of an extensive criminal registration file and the fingerprinting, photographing and processing of prisoners. The Identification Bureau is also charged with the voluntary registration and transferring of firearms. Missing persons reports are received initially and transmitted through local broadcast media and teletype.

The Camden Police Mobile Crime Unit is operated by the technicians of the Bureau. It responds on all major crimes within the city limits. In addition, the Identification Bureau technician is present at all parades, ceremonies, fires, and other disasters to take photographs and, if necessary, diagrams.

The general overall function of the Records and Identification Bureau is best illustrated by the chart compiled by personnel within the Bureau.

PHOTOGRAPHY:

Enlargements 5,400
Contact prints 2,800
Reproductions (copy) 6,800
Identification Photos 195
Total pieces of film developed 231

In addition the Records 6c Identification Bureau receive a daily average of:

Counter look-ups 

90
Telephone calls and requests 120
Mail, incoming and outgoing 85

The Supply Unit has the function of maintaining, issuing and repairing the multitude of equipment that is organic to the police department. Eighteen new men were equipped in 1962, and numerous items of replacement and return were handled by the Supply Unit. In addition, this Unit is charged with the operation of the Police Armory and ammunition supplies. Vehicles, radios, stretchers, lanterns, ammunitions, ropes, and other equipment pertinent to the operation of a modern police organization are the responsibility of the Supply Unit.

In the year 1962 the Records & Identification Bureau of the Camden Police Department provided the following services:

RECORDS ON FILE:

Total number of arrest cards

126,000

Criminal Fingerprint files 17,102
Criminal Registration Fingerprint files 2,900

PERSONS FINGERPRINTED:

Criminals 1,257
Criminal Registration 756
All other fingerprinted 1,642
Latent fingerprints at Crime Scenes and Autos 821
Total pieces of evidence received by Evidence Custodian 3,125

Missing Persons, valid alarms processed

male 191
female 192
Total 382
Firearms registered and transferred 432

The Records Room is the central system of filing and storing of records pertinent to the successful operation of Camden's Police Department. Data, records, photostats, and information are provided for various local, state, and federal law-enforcement agencies, as well as the Armed Services. Confidential inquiries for industry are also completed by the Records Room. In addition, all arrest, complaint, and investigation case records are processed, indexed, and filed by the personnel of the Records Room.

During 1962 the Records Bureau received and processed a total of 90,208 complaint forms and a record number of 5125 offense reports were typed, classified, and recorded.


Pages 47 through 50

STATISTICS UNIT

This newly created section of the Records and Identification Division is charged with the responsibility of compiling, categorizing and evaluating crime statistics and other records. Crime patterns, crime trends and their frequency in any given section of the city are recorded. This enables more effective concentration of police strength in critical areas. Graphs, charts, tables, and special reports make up the bulk of the Unit's work. It is possible to present a projected statistical report on any facet of police operations. In 1962 the Statistics Unit presented the following:

Daily Chief's log  365
Weekly Crime trend 52
Monthly FBI Return "A" 12
Special Reports on projects 23

Miscellaneous reports 
press, radio, other police agencies)

39
Prosecutors Monthly Gambling Reports 12
Prosecutor's Quarterly Gambling Reports 4

FBI Annual Reports B & C on Arrests and Classification of Crime

1

Consolidated Crime Report for Director

 1
Processed Arrest Cards
Processed Offense Reports

Chiefs Quarterly Part #1 Crime

4

Page 51

Crime Reporting

Page 51


THIS IS THE CITY

The city of Camden is divided into 14 wards. It is further sub-divides into ten (10) sectors for police protection. The following figures indicate the area and populations of the various Police Car Sectors, wards and their accompanying statistics (the are in square miles and the population based on the 1960 U.S. Census). 

SECTOR AREA POPULATION CRIME RATE* RATE PER 100
11 .50 10,747 467 4.36
12 .48 6,226 293 4.70
13 .53 7.904 370 4.68
15 .43 5.469 395 7.22
21 1.38 17,220 339 1.96
22 1.59 11.669 181 1.55
23 .83 8.668 323 3.73
25 1.03 17,169 536 3.12
31 1.07 14,803 412 2.79
33 2.06 17,284 199 1.15
10

9.9

117,159 3515 3.52

* Includes all reported larcenies for the year 1962

Page 52

Page 53


TOTAL REPORTED LOSSES AND RECOVERIES

1961
LOSS
1962
LOSS
1961
RECOVERED
1962
RECOVERED
JANUARY $94,598.01 $78,602.60

$71,069.66

$53,466.50

FEBRUARY

81,759.51

85,858.22

63,003.42

56,579.60

MARCH

109,467.86

74,907.81

99,565.42

40,447.17

APRIL

93,420.38

54,158.46

64,913.67

44,490.8538

MAY

64,997.18

62,834.42

52,659.02

49,987.90

JUNE

33,958.98

50,629.10

34,887.07

44,262.85

JULY

71,428.87

57,047.35

49,927.91

35,123.60

AUGUST

80,989.43

46,237.30

53,402.29

39,605.95

SEPTEMBER

52,256.13

67,094.22

49,351.85

22,259.78

OCTOBER

61,235.42

75,195.15

42,021.42

24,440.50

NOVEMBER

70,437.22

66,549.20

44,239.20

65,005.45

DECEMBER

52,146.08

75,195.15

40,933.00

35,455.38

TOTAL LOSS TOTAL RECOVERED
$866,695.07 $780,321.19 $665,973.93 $511,125.53
Amount Stolen 1961 $866,695.08
Amount Stolen 1962 $780,321.19
Decrease Stolen 1962 $86,373.89
Total Recovery 1962

$511,125.53 or 65.5%

 

Page 54


Page 55


Page 56 & Page 57

When the booklet was put together, pages 56 and 57 were omitted, I believe due to mis-numbering. If anyone has a version of this booklet with these pages included PLEASE contact me by e-mail.

Phil Cohen   


ARREST COMPARISON FOR PART #1 OFFENSES, 1961-62

CRIME

1961 1962 INCREASE DECREASE
MURDER 5 5

0

0

DEATH BY AUTO

11

9

0

2

RAPE 19 20 1 0
ROBBERY 59 65 6 0
AGGRAVATED ASSAULT 126 169 43 0
BURGLARY 209 189 0 20
LARCENY 303 311 8 0
AUTO THEFT 125 80 45
TOTAL ARRESTS FOR PART #1 857 848 9

A Part #1 Offenses as classified by the FBI is a crime of major proportion. Within this category fall all the offenses against the person (Murder, Death by Auto, Rape, Robbery and Aggravated Assault) and those offenses against property (Burglary, Larceny and Auto Theft) that are indictable and upon conviction would mean a severe penalty both monetary and imprisonment up to, and including, death. (The death penalty is, of course, dependent upon the respective statutes in the various states affected.)

Page 58


Page 59


Part #2 Offenses

A Part #2 Offense is a crime category established by the F.B.I. They include all offenses deemed secondary to the Part #1 or major criminal offenses. In addition, they are representative of the types of offenses found in all penal codes covering the 50 states. Finally, it is essential to have maximum uniformity in collecting crime statistics for periodic returns. The Standard Classification of Offenses system was devised in 1932 by the F.B.I. for the compilation of criminal statistics. This method of general classification was selected and adopted in order that police, judicial and penal statistics may be UNIFORMLY compiled in terms of a single crime category.

Page 59


ARREST COMPARISON FOR PART #2 OFFENSES, 1961-62

CRIME

1961 1962 INCREASE DECREASE
ASSAULT & BATTERY 994 978

0

16

WORTHLESS CHECKS & FORGERY

29

119

0

18

EMBEZZLEMENT & FRAUD 68 72 4 0
RECEIVING/POSSESSION STOLEN GOODS 45 53 8 0
CARRYING CONCEALED DEADLY WEAPONS 63 60 0 3
PROSTITUTION 6 10 4 0
SEX OFFENSES 169 157 0 12
FAMILY OFFENSES 33 26 0 7
NARCOTICS 2 33 11 0
LIQUOR VIOLATIONS 12 64 52 0
DRUNKENNESS 677 750 73 0
VAGRANCY 12 15 3 0
GAMBLING 56 206 150 0
DRUNKEN DRIVING 149 173 24 0
ALL OTHERS 1082 1293 213 0
TOTAL ARRESTS FOR PART #2 4592 5032 442

Page 60


ARREST BY WARDS - 1962

WARDS

1st
District

2nd
District

3rd
District

Wards
Arrest 1961

Ward
Arrest 1962

Difference
Number Pct.

1st

423

687

423

264

62.4

2nd

2514

1593

2524

931

58.4

3rd

362

371

362

9

2.4

4th

243

269

243

26

9.7

5th

253

393

253

140

35.6

6th

239

258

239

19

9.9

7th

311

319

311

8

2.5

8th

249

287

249

38

13.2

9th

292

298

292

6

2.1

10th

218

224

218

6

2.6

11th

211

192

211

19

9.9

12th

250

293

250

43

14.6

13th

218

243

218

25

13.3

14th

87

122

87

35

28.7

TOTALS:

4062

1357

461

5549

5880

331

5.9

Page 61


ARREST BY DISTRICTS - 1962

WARDS

1st
District

2nd
District

3rd
District

Total

1st

288

142

26

456

2nd

221

109

43

373

3rd

330

73

28

431

4th

375

99

37

511

5th

382

80

22

484

6th

377

131

39

547

7th

356

119

68

543

8th

412

153

60

625

9th

363

114

26

503

10th

349

124

30

503

11th

255

125

53

433

12th

354

88

29

471

TOTALS:

4062

1357

461

5880

Page 62


The Year 1962 marked the appointment of regular Chaplains in the Camden Police Department. All three denominations are represented. These dedicated men of the cloth are on call at all times to render their services to any and all members of the department.

CAMDEN POLICE CHAPLAINS

REVEREND JOHN GOAN(CATHOLIC)
IMMACULATE CONCEPTION CHURCH
614 Market Street, Camden, N.J.
WOoodlawn 4-1580

REVEREND J. HILLMAN COFFEE (PROTESTANT)
2930 Westfield Avenue, Camden N.J.
EMerson 5-0391

RABBI HARRY B. KELLMAN
CONGREGATION OF BETH EL
Park Boulevard, Camden, N.J.
WOoodlawn 3-5359

Page 63 & Page 64


CITY COUNCIL'S POLICE COMMITTEE

In the strong mayor-council form of government, a Police Committee is selected from the seven elected councilmen. The Camden Police Department is honored to have appointed as its committee Mr. Matthew Casper, President; Mrs. Elizabeth Hawks, Mr. Elijah Perry and Mr. Mario Rodriguez as their civilian Council Committee

Page 65


CITY COUNCIL'S POLICE COMMITTEE

Page 65

From Left: Elijah Perry, Matthew Casper, 
Mrs. Elizabeth Hawk, Mario Rodriguez


THE POLICE COMMITTEE

The year 1961 was a pioneer one for the City of Camden's Police Department, The 1st Annual Report was presented on the activities of the Department. We, the Committee Members, feel benefited by the year's experience and consider ourselves honored to be charged with the same assignment for 1962, We wish to present herewith to the officials of Camden, the Director of Public Safety, and the Chief of Police this product of our combined efforts.

Inspector John H. Watkins, Chairman

Sergeant Mario J. Ferrari

Sergeant Joseph W. Fearon

Sergeant David D. Kelly

Patrolman Joseph Kane

Patrolman Joseph J. McComb Jr.

Patrolman Anthony Martino

Photos were taken by the official Camden Police photographers.

Page 66


This edition of the Camden Police Annual Report was completed through the courtesy and cooperation of the Camden County Vocational and Technical High School Printing Shop, Mr. John T. Dempsey, Jr.

The many and expertly drawn charts and graphs were completed by Mr. Lawrence Mignogna of the Camden County Engineers Office.

Final editing was contributed by Mr. Gaeton Fonzi, of Somerdale, New Jersey. 

Special editions of the 1962 Annual Report were bound in hardback through the courtesy of Mr. Albert Gold. 

To all the above, we, the Committee, wish to convey our heartfelt thanks for a job well done.

Page 67


The Policeman

The policeman is not just a man, he is a living symbol. He is a modern day peace officer in the proud tradition of the frontier sheriffs, the U. S. Marshals, and the Texas Rangers who did so much to establish law and order in the early days of our Republic.

Like those before him, he too carries a gun. But he depends on science and tried and true police techniques to keep the peace. He works around the clock and performs a thousand tasks in the line of duty. He directs traffic, protects children along their school route, gives first aid to the injured, and in an emergency even delivers babies.

He stands between the community and the maniac killer or the armed thug. He has taken an oath to uphold the law even at the risk of his own life or limb.

The policeman uses his many skills to serve his community. All he asks for in return is your cooperation by obeying all the laws you, yourself, have created, and by teaching your children to respect his uniform.

Remember that the policeman is your friend in an emergency. But he can be a formidable foe in dealing with the lawless. In short, he makes your troubles his business.................

Page 68


RETURN TO DVRBS.COM HOME PAGE