AMERICAN BATTLE MONUMENTS COMMISSION
World War II Honor Roll

Charles F. McGowan

Private, U.S. Army

32264777

Company B
811th Tank Destroyer Battalion

Entered the Service from: New Jersey
Died: December 18, 1944
Buried at: Calvary Cemetery
                  State Highway 70 & Hampton Road
                  Cherry Hill NJ
Awards: Purple Heart

PRIVATE CHARLES F. McGOWAN was the son of Joseph and Stella McGowan. A devout Catholic, he had been an altar boy as a youth, and was active in the affairs of his church, Saints Peter and Paul Catholic Church, at Broadway and Spruce Streets. He attended Camden Catholic High School

A foreman at the Esterbrook Pen Company, Charles McGowan was active in industrial bowling and basketball leagues around Camden.  He lived with his wife Mary at 935 Lansdowne Avenue, in Camden NJ. before being inducted into the United States Army on April 6, 1942. 

Private McGowan went overseas in September of 1944. He was serving in the radio communications unit of Company B, 811th Tank Destroyer Battalion when he was killed in action on December 18, 1944 in Luxembourg. Attached to Combat Command A, 9th Armored Division, the 811th took part in the gallant six-day stand near in the vicinity of Waldbillig and Stavelborn, Luxembourg, which disrupted the German offensive during the Battle of the Bulge  Private McGowan was 31 years old at the time of his death..

Charles F. McGowan was survived by his wife, and his parents, of 108 South 24th Street in Camden. Brought home to New Jersey after the war, he was buried at Calvary Cemetery in what was then Delaware Township (present-day Cherry Hill) NJ in April of 1949. 


PRESIDENTIAL UNIT CITATION AWARDED

DEPARTMENT OF ARMY

THIS IS TO CERTIFY THAT
THE PRESIDENT
OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
HAS AWARDED THE

PRESIDENTIAL UNIT CITATION

to the
COMBAT COMMAND A,
9th ARMORED DIVISION

FOR EXTRAORDINARY HEROISM IN MILITARY OPERATIONS AGAINST AN ARMED ENEMY

16 DECEMBER 1944 to 22 DECEMBER 1944

This 12th Day of June 2001

  S/ Thomas E. White

Secretary of the Army

Combat Command A, 9th Armored Division is cited for extraordinary heroism and gallantry in combat in the vicinity of Waldbillig and Stavelborn, Luxembourg for December 16 to December 22, 1944 by repulsing constant and determined attacks by an entire German Division. Outnumbered five to one, with its infantry rifle companies surrounded for most of the time, clerks, cooks, mechanics, drivers and others manned the 10,000 yard final defensive line. Supported by the outstandingly responsive and accurate fire of its artillery battalion this widely dispersed force stopped every attack for six days until its surrounded infantry were ordered to fight their way back to them. This staunch defense disrupted precise German attack schedule and thus gave time for the United States III and XII Corps to assemble unhindered and then launch the coordinated attack which raised the siege of Bastogne and contributed to saving much of Luxembourg and its capital from another German invasion. The outstanding courage, resourcefulness, and determination of the gallant force are in keeping with the highest traditions of the United States Army

Division Troops (assigned)

Hqs & Hqs Company, Combat Command A
60th Armored Infantry Battalion
19th Tank Battalion
3d Armored Field Artillery Battalion
Company A 9th Armored Engineer Battalion
Troop A 89th Cavalry Reconnaissance Squadron
Troop B 89th Cavalry Reconnaissance Squadron
Troop C 89th Calvary Reconnaissance Squadron
Troop E (less 4th Platoon) 89th Cavalry Reconnaissance Squadron
Company A 2nd Medical Battalion, Armored
Company A 131st Ordnance Maintenance Battalion

Non Divisional Troops (attached)

HQs & Hqs Company 811 Tank Destroyer Battalion
Reconnaissance Company (less 2nd and 3rd platoons) 811th Tank Destroyer Battalion
Company B 811th Tank Destroyer Battalion
Battery A 482nd Antiaircraft Artillery AW Battalion (SP)
Battery B 482nd Antiaircraft Artillery AW Battalion (SP)

This information is provided on this new Presidential Unit Citation for those who may have served in any of these units.


Camden
Courier-Post

April 21, 1949

Note: The Courier-Post misspelled the name McGowan as "McGown"

Click on Image to Enlarge


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