THE YEAR 1922

SPAN OF A CENTURY
1828-1928

100 YEARS IN THE HISTORY OF CAMDEN AS A CITY

COMPILED FROM NOTES ANDS DATA COLLECTED BY
CHARLES S. BOYER

PRESIDENT CAMDEN COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY

PUBLISHED BY
CENTENNIAL ANNIVERSARY COMMITTEE
OF CAMDEN, NEW JERSEY

ADDITIONAL PHOTOS AND NOTES BY PHILLIP COHEN IN 2003

Camden banks received their first “Peace” silver dollars on January 4, 1922 from the Federal Reserve Bank.

On January 6, 1922 elaborate ceremonies and parades were held in Camden and Philadelphia in celebration of the first work on the Delaware River bridge. Governor Sproul, of Pennsylvania, drove a silver pick into the planking as the first physical act in starting the span.

The Camden Young Men’s and Young Women’s Hebrew Association brought to a close on January 30, 1922 a campaign which secured 900 members and about $9,000 in money.

The first Auto Show to be held in Camden opened March 6, 1922 in the Third Regiment Armory.

   

Work on the new Reading Terminal building at Mechanic Street was started in the spring of 1922.

   

Former Judge John B. Kates, of Camden, was, on March 22, 1922 elected Vice Chairman of the recently created New Jersey Interstate Bridge and Tunnel Commission.

   

Camden’s first public comfort station, located under the south plaza of the Court House, was opened May 9, 1922.

   

The Mary J. Ball Home and Day Nursery surrendered its charter in May of 1922.

   

“Pay as you leave” service introduced on Camden trolley cars in June, 1922.

   

Howard M. Cooper, lawyer, prominent local historian, and a descendant of the original settlers of Camden, died at the age of 78 years on June 22, 1922.

   

The Haddon Press established in Camden June 1, 1922.

   

Miss Margaret Kates, daughter of Judge and Mrs. John B. Kates, was the sponsor of Caisson “B” of the Delaware River Bridge, launched on July 18, 1922.

   

Women were appointed to positions on the city and county Election Boards in the Fall of 1922. 

   

The Victor Talking Machine Company, on October 19, 1922 filed with the Secretary of State at Trenton an amendment to its certificate of incorporation, increasing its capital stock from $5,500,00 to $35,000,000.

   

The final work of elevating the tracks of the West Jersey and Seashore Railroad Company in the southeastern section of Camden was completed in December of 1922. This work removed the last grade crossing of the steam lines of the “Pennsy” in Camden. 

   

The reopening of the White Horse Pike as a paved highway was celebrated on November 4, 1922 with a big automobile parade, followed by a dinner in the Camden Armory, attended by 3000 persons.

   

Permits for construction costing $4,343,192 were issued by the Camden Building Department in 1922. This was a large increase over 1921, when the cost of construction work was $1,908,327.

   

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