THE YEAR 1895

SPAN OF A CENTURY
1828-1928

100 YEARS IN THE HISTORY OF CAMDEN AS A CITY

COMPILED FROM NOTES ANDS DATA COLLECTED BY
CHARLES S. BOYER

PRESIDENT CAMDEN COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY

PUBLISHED BY
CENTENNIAL ANNIVERSARY COMMITTEE
OF CAMDEN, NEW JERSEY

ADDITIONAL PHOTOS AND NOTES BY PHILLIP COHEN IN 2003

The second Charity Ball was held in the Temple Theatre on February 20, 1895, the proceeds being divided between the Camden Dispensary and the Women’s Park Association. 

On March 5th, boxer James "Gentleman Jim" Corbett, then the Heavyweight Champion of the World,  appeared at the Temple Theatre. It is not known if he sparred.

 

Cooper Park was bought in November of 1895 for $75,000. The original price asked was $90, 000. The house, which stood in the center of this square and which was subsequently used as a branch of the Public Library, was built by Richard M. Cooper in 1816. The library was popularly known as the Cooper Branch.

 

Three Postcards
depicting
Cooper Park

Click on image to Enlarge

On May 27, 1920 City Council voted to change the name of Cooper Park to Johnson Park, in honor of Eldridge R. Johnson, President of the Victor Talking Machine Company, who had donated the funds to build a new library to replace the Richard Cooper House. 

The
Cooper Branch
of the 
Free Public Library

Built by
Eldridge R. Johnson

Click on Image to Enlarge

The Library has been known as the Walt Whitman Poetry Center since the late 1970s.

The Calvary Presbyterian Church, a split from the old First Presbyterian Church, was organized on June 6, 1895, in the building formerly occupied by the North Baptist Church, at the southeast corner of 2nd and Pearl Streets, which was purchased for $18,000. The new organization was formerly accepted into the West Jersey Presbytery on June 5, 1895, and its first pastor installed on June 12, 1895. The congregation of the is church returned to the First Presbyterian on June 22, 1924.

The pottery business from which the Camden Pottery Company originated, was started in Camden about 1895 by a Mr. Lyons, of Philadelphia, who carried on the business for about two years, when it was closed. After standing idle until 1900 the plant was then purchased by Murrell Dobbins, of Philadelphia, and has since that time been under the control of Mr. Dobbins or his son, Munroe Dobbins, who as of 1928 was the President of the company. The capacity of the plant was doubled from five kilns in 1906 to 10 kilns by 1928.

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