THE YEAR 1876

SPAN OF A CENTURY
1828-1928

100 YEARS IN THE HISTORY OF CAMDEN AS A CITY

COMPILED FROM NOTES ANDS DATA COLLECTED BY
CHARLES S. BOYER

PRESIDENT CAMDEN COUNTY HISTORICAL SOCIETY

PUBLISHED BY
CENTENNIAL ANNIVERSARY COMMITTEE
OF CAMDEN, NEW JERSEY

ADDITIONAL PHOTOS AND NOTES BY PHILLIP COHEN IN 2003

John Hunt, proprietor of the Franklin Carpet Works, on Front Street above Market, exhibited in January of 1876, a "Centennial Carpet" which he made in honor of the Centennial in Philadelphia.

"Why Don't People Go To Church?" was a question asked in the Camden newspapers in January of 1876. The same question was being asked in 1928, and in 2003. 

Large numbers of Camden people attended the Moody and Sankey evangelistic meetings in Philadelphia in January of 1876. 

The Trade Insurance Company, with headquarters at 103 Market Street, founded in 1873, reported in January of 1876 assets of nearly $300,000 and a surplus of $100,000. William Moore was president and Edward May, secretary.

The "bell and punch" used by the drivers of the Camden horse cars was dispensed with January 1, 1876. 

A petition addressed to the New Jersey Legislature was circulated in January 1876 asking permission to increase the city's bonded debt to "finish and furnish" Camden's new City Hall, which was to be opened formally January 27, 1876. 

Mrs. E.R. Shubrick was Chairman of the Women's Centennial Committee of Camden County. This and similar committees throughout the State raised money for the New Jersey Building at the Centennial. 

A "feminine" attired in a bloomer costume attracted a number of "followers" on Market Street on February 19, 1876. It wouldn't bother them in 1928. 

It was reported in February of 1876 that "cattle are permitted to run at large in the Second Ward, to the great annoyance of the citizens". 

Camden's horse cars did not run on Sundays, and in March 1876, a movement was started to have them operate on the Sabbath because of crowds expected to attend the Centennial Exhibition in Philadelphia.

Employees of the Caffrey Carriage Works organized the Caffrey Cornet band top play at the Centennial.

The first town clock in the tower of the City Hall was placed in position in May of 1876. It cost $3,575. It rang out the hours for the first time on May 26, 1876. 

3rd Street was "coated" with oyster shells from Plum Street (present-day Arch Street) to Cooper Street in May of 1876. 

Camden's business houses and residences were decorated with bunting and illuminated on the night of May 10, 1876 in honor of the opening of the Centennial Exhibition in Philadelphia. 

The Esterbrook Pen Company, based in Camden, made the only exhibit of steel and metallic pens at the Philadelphia Exposition. The variety of styles of pens exhibited outnumbered those of any European exhibitor. 

Citizens Coach Company organized in September of 1876 to operate coaches from the West Jersey Ferry to 6th and Linden Streets. 

Citizens of Camden complained in October of 1876 about the scarcity of street lamps in the northern section of the city, and of the practice of extinguishing all lamps at midnight, and of not keeping them lit on moonlight nights, or on nights when the moon "was supposed to shine".

On October 25, 1876 there were just 338 Smiths, big and little, living in the city of Camden.

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