CAMDEN, NEW JERSEY

1890
Historical and Industrial Review
of Camden, New Jersey

I have scanned in its entirety the Historical and Industrial Review of Camden, New Jersey, which was commissioned and published by Camden's Board of Trade, a forerunner of the Chamber of Commerce. This book was  donated to the website by Bob Stanton, a Parkside native, World War II vet, author, and all around good guy. I had an earlier edition, also published in 1890, which had about 25 fewer pages, other than that the two volumes are identical, but there are some small differences in the page order between the two volumes. A small number of articles are repeated, as they were put in different places during the two printings.

I have converted the entire book to text, which will make searching within this document feasible, and hopefully will bring some attention to it via on-line search engines! I am also, for reasons of clarity, converting words that were abbreviated in the published work back to their full-length. 

Please write with any questions and comments... and as always, HAVE FUN!!

Phil Cohen
May 4, 2012
 

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WILLIAM R. BENNETT
See Page 78



HISTORICAL 
AND 
Industrial Review 
OF 
CAMDEN, 
NEW JERSEY.

NEW YORK: 
COMMERCIAL PUBLISHING COMPANY.
1890


HARRIS GRAFFEN 
SECRETARY, BOARD OF TRADE. 



THE
Camden City Board of Trade

IN recognition of the serious detriment to the advancement of the general interest of the city, by reason of lack of unity on questions of trade and commerce, and in furthering the material prosperity of the municipality, a number of citizens organized THE. CAMDEN CITY BOARD OF TRADE. It was believed that such an organization would by concert of action, not only promote the material welfare of the community, and give increased efficiency to many individual enterprises, but that the pulse of the commercial. financial, manufacturing, and industrial establishments would be quickened and strengthened. 

The Board is composed of leading citizens, most of whom are large property holders, and representing in some measures the taxable value of the city, it is reasonable to assume that its action would be for the best interests of the community. The City of Camden. though occupying a position similar in many respects to that of Brooklyn, did not receive the benefit from Philadelphia, that was given the former by the City of New York.' Brooklyn and New York have had a wonderfully similar experience from the benefits of the "Reciprocity Doctrine," which is now assuming a large measure of public thought. The growth of the larger city advantageously affected the life of the smaller one. Did one receive an impetus in her development, the other was similarly affected, and so on through the years, these two cities, have grown apace. Not so, however, with Camden as related to the growth of the great City of Philadelphia. Geographically considered Philadelphia and Camden are similar to New York and Brooklyn, but in the vital point of comparison they are radically different. New York and Brooklyn, though occupying opposite banks of the same river, are in one State and subject to the same State influences and benefits, whilst Philadelphia and Camden, situated upon the western and eastern slopes of the Delaware River respectively, are in different Commonwealths, and consequently their general interests were not in harmony. The increased prosperity in the commercial and manufacturing interests of Philadelphia was not beneficial to Camden. It could not be expected that the merchants and tradesmen of Philadelphia would help promote the welfare of a city in an adjoining State, but that on the contrary care would be exercised that the overplus of business should be transferred to smaller towns within the borders of Pennsylvania. 

The City of Camden being thus overshadowed by her neighbor across the river, quietly submitted to this order of things, and no concerted effort was made to secure the locating of industrial establishments on the eastern shores of the Delaware river. Possessed of immense natural facilities, having hundreds of acres of available sites for the location of every conceivable kind of industry, the latter have in the main been unoccupied simply for the lack of progressive and enterprising action on the part of those who represent our city. Too much conservatism has effectually stifled the wide-awake business activity of the few, and nearly every individual effort looking to a new departure has been smothered by the do-nothing policy of those who should have assisted. 

Relief from this stagnation has been expected from those in charge of our local affairs. This has at last been found to be if not an impossibility, at least impracticable. City governments like republics do not comprehend the promotion, or the fostering of industries, and private enterprise, has at last been enlisted to fill the vacuum. To suppose a republic to be practicable strips from the Goddess of Liberty her ideality, and demolishes the ethereal essence of her existence, and that would be painful. So with municipal authorities, the experience of Camden has not been unlike that of other cities, and a Board of Trade has been organized in order that the city should keep abreast of the times, and not suffer in the competitive struggle with other municipalities.

The Board has been in existence a little over a year. Of course its progress has been slow, and necessarily so. Its aim is to accomplish some practical good for the benefit of the city. With due regard to the importance of establishing a better order of things, a strong effort is made to determine the elective field of Camden's opportunities, and the scope of her possibilities. It has been tersely said that "all thing~ will come to him who waits." This may be true, but the Board of Trade has been awakened to the realization of the fact that some of the "all things" they don't want, and that is "business stagnation," and "municipal decay." 

The Board are preparing, through its Secretary, a prospectus in which will appear in a comprehensive form the advantages which the city can offer for the consideration of persons who are engaged in business enterprises. Camden has suffered in the past, by reason of her nearness to Philadelphia, now it is proposed, instead of waiting for "all things" to come, as a reward for patience, to go boldly out into the open market of competition and secure the portion of our inheritance that belongs to us. 

The Board have awakened to the fact that Camden is most magnificently planted on the side of the finest fresh tidal river in the world, and with a water frontage which, by the expenditure of a moderate sum of money, can be made, in the language of Chief Engineer Brown of the Pennsylvania Railroad System, the equal of any harbor in the country. Her system of Railways traverse every portion of the State, and their termini, is found in every section of the country. 

The personnel of the Board is exceptionally welt adapted for successfully carrying out its mission. In its membership are found many of the representatives of every branch of successful businessmen. Its President, Mr. E. N. Cohn, has had remarkable success as a builder and contractor, and he has within the past ten years erected dwellings, the aggregate cost exceeding several millions of dollars. Mr. Cohn is also President of the Roanoke R. R. & Lumber Company. 

MR. E. N. COHN, PRESIDENT BOARD OF TRADE

Mr. Howland Croft, the Vice President, is an extensive manufacturer of worsted yarns, and whilst finding his business demanding his personal superintendence, arranges to attend the meetings, and is always interested in forwarding the cause which the Board represents. 

Mr. Wilbur F. Rose, the Treasurer, is Cashier of the National State Bank, an institution which has contributed largely to Camden's prosperity, and maintained her reputation at the highest standard of her opportunities throughout the country. Mr. Rose is gifted with rare judgment and keen discrimination. Profoundly interested in all that pertains to the welfare of the city and with a kindly and supporting sympathy, in every movement tending to the betterment of things, it is of course a matter of fact that Mr. Rose is one of the most active workers in the Board. 

The relation of Mr. Harris Graffen, the Secretary of the Board, to this article naturally precludes any further mention. 

In the Executive Council are to be found such public spirited and enterprising citizens as William Bleakley, dealer in lime and sand; J. S. Justice, prominent in real estate matters; John W. Cheney, an authority in insurance; George Barrett, lumber and spar merchant; W. S. Scull, importer of teas, coffees and spices; Howard Carrow, the leader of the junior bar; Robert F. S. Heath, Register of Deeds, and also a leading manufacturer of grocers' specialties; J. J. Burleigh, Train Master of the West Jersey Railway, and H. B. Wilson, dealer in coal and wood. 

Pages 5-9 

The roll of membership is so thoroughly representative of Camden's best interests, that it is given in full:

OFFICERS AND MEMBERS CAMDEN BOARD OF TRADE

President- E. N. Cohn 
Vice- President- Howland Croft
Treasurer- Wilbur F. Rose
Secretary- Harris Graffen

Executive Council: 

William Bleakley Geo. Barrett
Howard Carrow H. B. Wilson
R.F. S. Heath Wm. S. Scull
Jacob S. Justice John W. Cheney

J. J. Burleigh

Members: 

Armstrong, Hon. E. A., Attorney at Law 
Barrett, George, Lumber, Saw Mill and Sparmaker 
Bailey, W. T., Builder 
Bender, R. S., Bookbinder and Chief of Fire Department
Bleakley, Wm., Lime and Cement 
Bennett, Volney G., Lumber 
Bottomley, John T., Treasurer Camden Woolen Mills. 
Burleigh, J. J., Train Master West Jersey R. R. 
Bottomley, John H., with Priestley & Co., Manufacturers- Worsted Goods 
Bennett, W. R., Jeweler. 
Bradley, W. J., Superintendent, American Dredging Co.
Bonsall, H. L.; Publisher - Daily Post. 
Bailey, Samuel T., Oil Cloth Manufacturer 
Carrow, Howard, Attorney at Law 
Croft, Howland, Manufacturer - Worsted Yarns 
Croft, J. W., Manufacturer - Worsted Yarns 
Cohn, E. N., Building and Contractor 
Cheney, John W., Fire Insurance 
Curtis, Cyrus H. K., Publisher - Ladies' Home Journal 
Chew, Sinnickson, Publisher - West Jersey Press 
Dialogue, John H., Ship Builder 
Danenhower, G. R., Grocer 
Drake, Herbert A., Attorney at Law 
Depuy, Watson, Cashier - First National Bank 
D'Arcy, John, Architect 
Derousse, L.B., City Comptroller 
Donges, John W., Physician and Druggist 
Erdman, D. H., Stoves 
Ernst, Wilson, Builder 
Eastlack, J. R., Grocer 
Furbush, Charles, Machine Manufacturer  
Ferris, Isaac, Jr., Shoe Manufacturer  
Francis, H. B., Plumber 
Farr, Edward L., Oil Cloth Manufacturer  
Gomersall, D. H., Dry Goods and Shoes 
Graffen, Harris, Real Estate 
Garwood, Samuel, Managing Director - Philadelphia & Atlantic City R. R. 
Garland, John C., Cashier - Western National Bank, Philadelphia 
Hood, John 
Hansell, William C., Paper Hanger 
Heath, R. F. S., Register of Deeds 
Hall, E.S., Treasurer and Secretary - New Jersey Trust and Safe Deposit Co. 
Harned, Thomas B., Attorney at Law 
Hallinger, H. G., Manager - Camden Real Estate and Investment Co. 
Hatch, Cooper B., Brickmaker 
Hayes, James E., Attorney at Law 
Holl, George, Builder 
Ivins, Mahlon, Painter 
Justice, Jacob S., Real Estate 
Janke, Charles A., Manager - Delaware & Atlantic Telegraph and Telephone Co. 
Johnson, Charles, Builder 
Kilpatrick, Samuel A., Lime and Coal. 
Knowles, Wm. H., Manager - Cooper's Point Iron Works
Kobus, Anthony, Shoe Dealer 
Lamar, A. C., Glass Manufacturer 
Leatherbury, Claudian, Real Estate 
Mogan, Randal E., Real Estate and Builder 
Mason, R. C., Pianos 
Michellon, F. F., City Treasurer 
Milliette, Alexander J., Printer 
Murphy, P. J., Oil Cloth Manufacturer  
Morgan, J. Willard, Attorney at Law 
Nunes, Emmanuel, Wholesale and Retail Clothing 
Reeve, Benjamin C., Oil Cloth Manufacturer  
Roberts, Edward, Proprietor - North Camden Livery Stable 
Rose, Wilbur F., Cashier - National State Bank 
Risley, D. Somers, Real Estate and Insurance 
Scull, J. W., Worsted Manufacturer  
Sewell, Gen. William J., ex-U. S. Senator and Vice-President - West Jersey R.R.
Scull, William S., Coffee, Teas and Spices 
Scudder, William C., Lumber 
Somers, Frank C., Dredger 
Safford, Thomas S., Treasurer - West Jersey Paper Manufactory 
Safford, Frank D., Manager - W. H. Fay & Co., Manufacturers of Paper  
Sitley, Frank, Flour, Feed and Grain Merchant
Shearman, William H., Contractor 
Stockham, Charles, Saw Mill 
Simmons, Fithian S., Undertaker 
Taylor, George E., Flour, Feed and Grain 
Troth, Amos W., Gent's Furnishings, Philadelphia 
Taylor, Clarence W., Real Estate 
Vansciver, J. B., Dealer in Furniture and Carpets. 
Wolfe, Harry F., Grocer 
Wilson, H. B., Dealer in Coal and Wood 
Wood, Walter, President - Camden Iron Co. 
West, George S., Surrogate of Camden County
Williams, Carlton M., of Morse, Williams & Co., Manufacturer of Elevators. 
Woolman, Franklin C., Attorney at Law 
York, M. H., Wool Merchant 

The subjects that are now engaging the attention of the Board are the improvement of the Harbor of Philadelphia. The Government has ordered the removal of the Islands which now obstruct in some measure the navigation of vessels of the largest tonnage, and the contract for their removal has been awarded. The Board of Trade are to be congratulated upon their determined effort to secure from the Government Engineers a proper and just recognition of the claims of Camden, and the assurance given by the Commission is a guarantee that the readjustment of the Harbor lines will vastly increase our water front privileges. When it is known that Camden has a frontage for miles upon a magnificent river, having a uniform width of two thousand feet, it will not be strange if 
hundreds of enterprises will not be speedily in operation along the Jersey shore. 

The necessity for public parks is receiving due consideration at the Board, and the measures now in progress bid fair to have our City possess a magnificent park, so that in this regard Camden shall not be behind her neighbors.

The Board at a recent meeting petitioned Councils for the opening of Delaware Avenue northward from Federal Street to Vine Street one hundred feet, and Front Street southward from Hartman Street to Bulson Street, the same width. These two streets front on the river Delaware nearly the entire length of the city, and when opened through and widened to the extent proposed, will give Camden the finest street for commercial purposes on the continent. A company is being organized for the purpose of constructing a double track railway on these two streets, and this Belt Line, as it is known, having connection with the present and prospective systems of railways, will permit every needed facility for transportation by rail, and as the projectors of the Belt Line intend to construct sidings with the pier and wharfage system, it will undoubtedly give our city every opportunity to trade in the commerce of the world.

A Board of Trade journal will be published monthly, the first number appearing early in November. The management of the journal will endeavor to make it thoroughly representative of Camden and its interests. The various manufactural and industrial pursuits will receive due attention, and no effort will be spared to place Camden in the place to which she is entitled. The Journal will be conducted by Mr. Harris Graffen, Secretary of the Board, who will be assisted in the business management by Mr. John J. Macnamara, who has years of experience in journalistic life. 

This article would be incomplete without an expression from the Board of their grateful appreciation of the efforts made by the Public Press of Camden to further the actions of the Board. There has ever been by the Press a disposition to assist the work of the Board, and the Secretary cheerfully acknowledges his obligation for the kindly and courteous reatment he has received from the reportorial staff of the local press. 

HARRIS GRAFFEN

PAGES 5-15


HOWLAND CROFT
VICE-PRESIDENT, BOARD OF TRADE


Pages 16 to 29


Historical and Industrial Review
OF THE
City of Camden

The city of Camden is the fourth in population of the cities of New Jersey, and is situated on the east bank of the Delaware, opposite Philadelphia, on a peninsula formed by the Delaware river and Cooper's and Newtown creeks. The site of the present city was purchased and settled in the latter part of the seventeenth century by four individuals.

William Cooper, in 1679, located the land lying between the river on the west and north, Cooper's creek on the east and Cooper street on the south, and settling there m_i682 called it "Pyne Point," on account of a dense pine forest which he found there. He established a ferry to Philadelphia, and that ferry has continued in operation until this day.

In 1682 William Royden bought the land lying between Cooper street and Line street, which he afterwards sold to William Cooper.

In 1690 Archibald Mickle, having bought the land: lying between I,ine ditch and Newton creek, and extending from the Delaware to the Mount Ephraim road, built a residence 
on the river bank. His purchase now comprises the Eighth ward of this city. The fourth settler was John Kaighn, a carpenter, who in 1696 bought 455 acres of land lying between Line ditch and Line street. He built a one-story brick house at Second and Sycamore streets, which, with the addition of two stories, still stands. The house then stood on the river shore, now two squares away. The name of Camden was first applied by Jacob Cooper, to that portion lying between Cooper and Arch streets (then Plum street), and extending east to Sixth street, in 1773 when he had it surveyed and laid off into town lots.

In 1820 Edward Sharp, the first one to suggest "bridging the Delaware, laid out the land from Federal street to south of Bridge avenue and running from East to West street, which he called "Camden Village.". Other portions of the now city were known as 'Billy Cooper's Ferry," "Kaighntown," and " Dogwood-town," while the entire settlement for 
many years was called " Pluck-'em-in," from an alleged practice of the Indians of the locality of throwing infants into the cold water of the streams, as a test of their vitality and endurance.

The location of Camden, on a broad river, opposite Philadelphia, for a long time the metropolis of the nation, gave to it an importance it would not otherwise have attained, and made it the center of travel for all of "West," or rather South, Jersey. This travel called for ferries, and these were early established and persistently maintained until now five ferries, with twenty capacious and powerful boats, are used between the two 
shores. Excellent turnpike roads were constructed between Camden and the numerous flourishing towns to the north, east and south, and the town or rather cluster of villages, as designated above, was made lively by the arrival and departure of stage coaches with their passengers, farmers' wagons with their produce, and oystermen and fishermen with the shelly and scaly gatherings of the sounds and inlets of the seashore, not omitting mention, however, of the begrimed dealer in charcoal. Yet these enterprises gave emplo3rment to comparatively few, and Camden's growth was slow.

There were no postal facilities until 1803, when the "Cooper's Ferry Post-office" was established, at the foot of Cooper street. Benjamin B. Cooper was the first postmaster, and a cigar box would hold a day's gathering of letters. It is now a first-class post-office, and a $100,000 building is about to be constructed for its accommodation. The first letter carrier was appointed in 1852, and free delivery established in 1863, to be abolished in 1864, and re-established in 1873. There are now employed about thirty carriers.

Less for supplying the wants of Camden than for the accommodation of the inhabitants of the towns whose business called them there, "The State Bank at Camden" was formed and opened for business, at Second and Market streets, June i6th, 1812. The capital stock was $800,000, but in subsequent years this was reduced to $200,000. It is now known as the "National State Bank, at Camden." Five banking institutions, with 
capital and surplus exceeding a million and a quar800, with over $8,000,000 capital employed, besides. which there seventeen building and loan associations, with assets reaching $1,500,000. 

As before stated, Camden was composed of a few straggling settlements, the people chiefly engaged in the ferry and stage business. Industrial establishments. were few and limited in capacity. As early as 1810· Benjamin Allen had a tannery at "Kaighntown," which he conducted on a large scale until about 1830,. when he died. 

About 1812, Isaac VanSciver, encouraged by Joseph Kaighn, started a carriage factory at Kaighntown; afterwards removing to Front and Plum (now Arch), where, for forty years, he did an extensive business, shipping his products to the West Indies and South America. Later, Samuel Scull, succeeded by Isaac Cole (known as King Cole), manufactured carriages. on a large scale near Second and Arch, and the Collings, Front and Market; Hunt, Market below Front, and Caffrey, Tenth and Market, the ancient "Dogwoodtown." have maintained Camden's renown as a producer of carriages. 

An early industry was the weaving of the celebrated " Jersey sausage," noted for its highly essential flavor, the Philadelphia lovers of which found the vendors in. the Jersey "market sheds," on Market street, is almost extinct, German butchers having supplanted  Jersey weavers" of the latter, but one or two remaining in. the business. 

The lumber business, now an extensive one, was. first started by William Carman, who, about 1822. built a sawmill near the foot or-Cooper street. 

In 1842 John &James G. Capewell established glass works at Kaighn avenue and Locust street, which they -conducted for many years, giving employment to a large number of men and boys. 

In 1824 Jacob Lehr built a candle factory near Fifth and Market streets, which he carried on successfully until 1840, when he ceased operations, and the building was afterwards used as a piano factory. 

The shoe industry, which now numbers many establishments, was carried 011 by individuals as late as 1830, the method being for the shoemaker to visit the bomes of his patrons, was provided with leather, and make shoes for the entire family. Among the most noted of these was James Deur, who was elected to the City Council in 1828, but declined to serve. 

The earliest mention of iron works in Camden is that of the blacksmith shop of Samuel Bates, on the site of Collings's carriage factory, east side of Front, above Market, which was started in 1800. He was succeeded by Thomas L. Rowand, who added carriage-smithing to the business, which he sold to Samuel Foreman, who, in 1841, sold out to Samuel D. Elfreth. 'The latter, in 1848, removed to the opposite side of the street and carried on an extensive machine shop, which he sold in 1863 to Derby & Weatherby. 

In 1835 Elias Kaighn started a foundry at Second and Kaighn's avenue, which was burned down. He started iron works on the present site of the Camden Tool and Tube Works, and in 1840 established a foundry and plow factory at Front and Mechanic street, :selling large numbers of the once celebrated Kaighn plow. 

The foundries and machine shops of Camden now employ 1700 men, with $1,600,000 capital, and a pay roll of three-quarters of a million of dollars. 

The first fire engine was the "Perseverance," made by the celebrated "Pat" Lyon, of Philadelphia, and bought second-hand in 1810. The machine was stored in a shed in the rear of the bank building at Second and Market streets, and continued in service for nearly forty years. As there was no water works the engine was supplied with water by buckets passed from hand to hand from the nearest pump. Two similar engines were procured about twenty years later, and when the water works were established in 1848, other companies were formed, until the fire department numbered seven engines and hose companies. These were reduced to two on the establishment of the paid Fire Department in 1869; since increased to four engines with tenders, and one hook and ladder truck. The department now consists of a chief, assistant chief, five foremen and 37 men, with horses and all the latest improved fire alarm appliances. 

The first house built for religious purposes was the Newtown Meeting House, on Mount Ephraim avenue, erected by the Society of Friends in 1801. followed by the Methodists, at Fourth and Federal, 1810; by the Baptists, Fourth, below Market, in 1818; Episcopalians, Market, above Fourth, in 1835; Presbyterians, Fifth, below Cooper, in 1848; Roman Catholics, Fifth and Taylor's avenue, in 1859, and others later. The meeting houses now number: Catholics, 3; Protestant Episcopal, 8; Methodist Episcopal, 11; Baptist, 11; Lutheran, 3; Methodist Protestant, 1; Presbyterian, 
4; German Evangelical, 1; Friends, 2; Unitarian, 1; United Brethren in Christ, 1; miscellaneous, 7. A total of 52 edifices, including churches, chapels and missions. 

It was not for the needs of the people themselves, nor for their better government in the way of restraint, that the straggling villages, within the present limits of the city, were incorporated into a city, February 14, 1828. The population numbered 1143 and they were quiet folks, who if left alone would injure neither themselves nor others; but in those days woods covered much of the surface and offered allurements to pleasure seeking Philadelphians which they did not resist, and they crossed the river to enjoy the pleasures of cool shade and fresh air. They yielded to the enjoyment with such abandon as shocked the sense and propriety of the quiet Jerseymen. Camden was to Philadelphians what Gloucester City is to-day, and the simple township rule of one constable was insufficient to protect the quiet and repress the turbulent. Public gardens were numerous and well patronized: intoxicants were abundant and freely used. A city government with Mayor and police was deemed the panacea, and was obtained, A lockup was needed, and the old City Hall on Federal street, above Fourth, was built at a cost of $2000 and served the city for 46 years, when the present commodious structure was built at an unascertainable cost, but believed to be $14°,000. 

The boundaries fixed by the charter gave the city an area of nearly four square miles, and the extension of 1871 an area of six and a half miles. The government was simple in construction. A Recorder and five Aldermen, appointed by the Legislature, five Councilmen, elected by the people, and a Mayor, elected by Aldermen, Recorder and Councilmen, constituted Common Council, while the Mayor, Recorder and Aldermen formed a court to try violations of the laws Common Council might ordain. Changes were made. In 1844, the Mayor was made elective by the people, and in 1848, the Aldermen and Recorder were removed from Council, and the entire body was elected by the people. In 1851 further changes were made. 

In 1871 a new charter was granted, and Newton township was annexed, making two additional wards, eight in all; the terms of the Mayor, Recorder and Councilmen (three from each ward) were extended to three years .. 

Under these charters the city has grown at a rapid rate, and more than maintains its ranks among cities of its class. 

In 1854 the Water Works Company removed the plant to Pavonia, and in 1871 the city purchased them for $200,000. Since the purchase the rates have been reduced, the supply increased and the quality improved. There are 60 miles of pipe laid; the supply is 15,000,000 gallons per day, and the receipts amount to $122,730.82 annually. 

The police force of the city now consists of a chief and 45 patrolmen and 8 men in the Police Patrol system. 

16-24

THE CITY'S GROWTH

When the city was chartered, in 1828, the population was 1143. The following table gives the increase since: 

1830- 1,987 1865- 18,315
1840- 3,360 1870- 20,045
1850- 9,118  1875- 33,852
1855- 11,217 1880- 41,159 
1860-14,368 1885- 52,884 

The present population, according to the estimate .of the supervisor of the census just completed, is 60,000. 

The representative business houses of the present day, who, by their energy and enterprise, contribute to the City's material wealth, occupy the remainder of this department of our work. 

J. B. VAN SCIVER & CO. 

This firm occupy a handsome building on the corner of Delaware avenue and Federal street. It is of mammoth proportions and is visible along the whole river front. Furniture of all descriptions, from the plain and substantial to the aesthetic, artistic and costly, are to be found in its spacious warerooms. A large trade 1S enjoyed, extending all over the State of New Jersey, as well as its sister States. A remarkable fact connected with the business 1s the circumstance that it entirely overshadows any enterprise of its kind in the city of Philadelphia, and by liberal and judicious advertising has succeeded in winning a large trade in its sister city. 

25

THE CAMDEN IRON WORKS. 

The Camden Iron Works, the largest manufacturing plant in the city of Camden, known for many years as Starr's Iron Works, the industry having first been established by the Messrs. Starr, whose names have for over 40 years been associated with the iron 

industry and with the growth and development of the city of Camden, are located on Cooper's Creek. The' acorn from which this large industrial plant has grown was first planted W 1845, when John F. Starr, Sr., built the Camden Iron Works on the north side of' Bridge avenue above Third street, for the manufacturing of steam pipes and gas works machinery. He was, previous to that associated with his father, Moses Starr, and his brother, Jesse W. Starr, in steamboat building. 

In 1847 Jesse W. Starr became associated in the business, and the firm erected additional shops on Bridge avenue, near Second street, and increased facilities affording employment for about 100 hands .. In 1847 the business had grown so much that the plot of ground on Cooper's creek was purchased, and the' foundation was laid for what is now known as the Camden Iron Works, the most extensive iron industry in West Jersey. The works were enlarged from time' to time from the date of establishment in 1847, and in the course of a few years the Messrs. Starr found themselves with more orders on hand than they could conveniently fill, although employing from 800 to 1000' men. The enlarged works gave a new impetus to the prosperity of Camden city, and the class of work for which the works had become famous was known an over the United States, and many large contracts for gas machinery were supplied to many of the large· cities in the United States and Canada. 

John F. Starr, Sr. did not sever his connection with the· works until 1870, when he retired from active business. 

In 1883 the plant was purchased by a stock company, known as R. D. Wood & Co., and they have since been in almost constant operation, there being on the pay roll at present about 700 hands. 

Prior to the purchase of the works in f883 by R. D. Wood & Co., they had not been in operation for about two years, put were put in full blast in 1884, after many needed improvements and alterations had been made. The plant includes an area of about 40 acres, about 20 of which are occupied by buildings and in use by the various manufacturing departments, while' the other is used for storing material and manufactured products. 

There are four large foundry buildings for the manufacture of cast-iron pipes, gas works machinery and water works plants, beside large machine shops, boiler houses, carpenter shop, blacksmith shops, pattern shop, store houses, offices and stables. The main machine building is 280 x 60 feet, and the foundry buildings range from 180 to 212 feet in length, and from 60 to 80 feet in width. The two boiler shops are 70xl60 feet in size, and the new blacksmith shop 40 x 80 feet. The works have a capacity for melting 40,000 tons of pig iron annually, and pipe of all sizes, ranging from 2 inch to 60 inch, are turned out. A specialty of large gas holders and machinery is one of the features of the works, and many have been built for various cities, including Philadelphia, Chicago, Louisville and many other places. This year ten large holders of different sizes will be built for cities in the United States. 

The works have a wharf frontage on Cooper's creek of about 800 feet, on which are six hydraulic cranes of different capacities for transferring materials from lighters to the cars, or for handling pipes of any size, which are being shipped away. Most of the material is brought to the works by lighters, and the greater portion of the pipe is taken away on the lighters. The yards have a complete system of railroad tracks, extending through the various departments, the entire length being about five miles. The works have their awn cars and engine for motive purposes, and the tracks are connected with" spurs" from the Pennsylvania Railroad. 

Walter Wood is President of the Company, and its Directors are as follows: George Wood, Walter Wood, Stuart Wood, James Whitaker, Josiah Bacon, Wm. H. Morris and Wm. J. Sewell

26 & 27

JOHNSON & HOLT'S FOUNDRY. 

The iron foundry of Johnson & Holt is located at the foot of Elm street, and was established in 1881 by Nelson W. Johnson and Benjamin Holt, at the foot of Pearl street, where their business of iron castings grew to such an extent as to require enlarged facilities, and the present shops were erected and fitted up with all the improved machinery and appliances for their special designs of work, which embraces everything in the line of general iron founders. The trade, which at first was principally local, is growing, and the firm now give employment to forty-six men, and report an encouraging state of business prosperity during past years, with promise of future activity at the firm's works. 

28

 


KLOSTERMANN BROS., TINWARE MANUFACTURERS 
BROADWAY AND MT. VERNON STREET

PROBABLY the largest and oldest established house in this line is that of Messrs. Klostermann Brothers. This house is one of the most favorably known in the city, from its fair dealing and good work. The business was established under this name in 1877, and has been one of the most marked successes. in the city.

The building has a frontage on Broadway of 20 feet and a depth of over 100 on Mt. Vernon street. The whole building is occupied, three floors and the cellar. All kinds of Ranges, Heaters and Heating Apparatus are their specialty. Many of the new houses in this section of New Jersey bear testimony to their good work. All kinds of Tin and Iron Roofing are done with the greatest possible care. A specialty is made of all kinds of Galvanized work, such as Cornices, Awnings, etc. Any special shapes. of Tinware may be gotten here. 

The workrooms are up-stairs and filled with all the best machinery. When running at fair business from 40 to 50 skilled workmen are employed and four teams. are kept busy. 

All the members of the firm are well known and respected business men of the city. There are three, John S., Frederick A. and Henry J., a specialty of this house is Torrid Steel Drum Furnaces. 

29 

Pages 16 to 29


Pages 30  to 69


A. R. DEASE, PAINTS, ETC.,
416 MARKET STREET 

AMONG the prominent houses in this line may be mentioned that of Mr. A. R. Dease. This business was established by Dease & Sloan, about five years ago, Mr. Sloan retiring after the first six months. in consequence of ill-health. 

The store is about 20 x 30 feet in dimensions. A large stock of Paints, Oils, Varnishes, Leads, Brushes. and Painters' Materials is also kept. All kinds of House, Job and Sign Painting are attended to at the shortest notice. Mr. Dease is the owner of Excelsior Water-Proof Brick Coating, which is absolutely waterproof. 


These Testimonials prove that Excelsior WaterProof Brick Coating is all that is claimed for it : 

Estate of RICHARD M. COOPER, DECEASED. 
JOHN W. WRIGHT,
123 Cooper Street, 

CAMDEN,
April 14,1887.

To whom it may concern: 

The Excelsior WaterProof Brick preparation applied by A. R. Dease, 416 Market Street, Camden. to exterior brick work, has given satisfaction wherever he has used it for me, and appears an effectual cure for the white effervescence on bricks.

JOHN W. WRIGHT

I have used in my business as a builder, bricks treated with the Excelsior Water-Proof preparation, as applied by A. R. Dease, of Camden, New Jersey. I found it an excellent preparation for hardening bricks and rendering them impervious to dampness, and I have no hesitation in recommending it to the use of builders and owners for the purpose of obviating damp, and alkali discolored walls.

WILLIAM H. COLE, May 3, 1887
Building Inspector, Camden, N. J.

ROBERTS & COHN, 
Builders and Contractors, 
No. 105 Market St., 
CAMDEN, N. J., 

April 30, 1887· 

To whom it may concern : 

We have used the E. W. P. B. C. on ten houses and it has given entire satisfaction, and we shall use it on all good houses that we will build hereafter. 

ROBERTS & COHN

Fifteen skilled workmen are constantly employed. Mr. Dease is a native of Reading, but has been here for the last nineteen years. He was in the 128th Reg't Penna. Volunteers, for nine months, and on the S. S. Powhatan for two years. He is an active member of the G. A. R., and of the Masonic Fraternity. 

29-30

HENRY FREDERICKS, HARDWARE AND BUILDING SUPPLIES, 
133-35-37 FEDERAL STREET 

THERE is not a more prominent establishment of this kind in the city than that of Mr. Henry Fredericks. This business is one of the oldest and best in the city. The business was started by the present owner in the year 1857. The store, proper, is 50 x 145 feet
in dimensions and fitted with the most approved - furnishings. A large warehouse is used that is located at the corner of Second and Bridge streets, which has an area of 40 x 140 feet. This is used for the storage of heavy building materials and mill work. 

The stock consists of everything that can possibly be imagined that pertains to the line. All kinds of Building Materials are kept: Sash, Doors, Blinds, Shutters, Mouldings, Balustrades, and Hardware and Builders' Materials in general.

Mr. W. H. Fredericks has been the manager of this establishment for the past eight years. When running normally the business employs about twenty capable and skillful assistants and two teams are kept busy. 

Henry Fredericks is a native of Hackensack, N. J., -but has resided here during the past forty-five years. 

William H. Fredericks was born in Camden, in 1854, are has resided here ever since.

Mr. H. Fredericks is an ex-sheriff of the city, and at present a member of the State Board of Charities . and Corrections. 

31 

MRS. C. R. JOHNSON, MILLINER, 
304 KAIGHN'S AVENUE 

AMONG the artistic trade avocations in Camden we mention in the pages of this review the millinery establishment of the lady whose name heads this article. Although established as recently as April, 1889, this representative house has readily sprang into. popular favor and is recognized as a leader in its line. The salesroom occupied is 18x32 feet in dimensions, finely appointed throughout in every detail, and carries. a comprehensive stock of Millinery Goods, Trimmed and Untrimmed Bonnets, Felt and Straw Goods, Ribbons, Flowers, Feathers, Bird's Heads, etc. 

A spacious room in the rear is stocked with every variety of Fancy Goods, such as Chenille, Embroidery, Silks, Satins, Laces, Linen, Floss, etc. A prominent feature of the establishment is in the.' Trimming of Hats and Bonnets into the leading metropolitan fashions. 

This is without a doubt one of the finest stores of its kind in this section and in the successful prosecution of business. Three competent assistants are employed. The Trimming Department is under the personal supervision of the proprietress herself, an adept in this artistic profession and a milliner of experience, who spares no pains, time nor expense in sustaining the well merited reputation of the establishment. 

A native of Delaware, the subject of this article spent a portion of her business career in Chicago in her present pursuit. Since establishing here she has won the esteem of the community and proven herself a capable, interesting business woman, sustaining 
herself in commercial as well as social circles. 

GLOVER, WALL PAPERS,
522 MARKET STREET 


THIS gentleman was formerly connected with the firm of Green & Glover, of 5th and Benson Streets, has been in business for himself for the past four years. He occupies a neat place, 20 by 40 feet in dimensions, and his stock consists of all grades and qualities of Wall Paper. He has been in this business for over a quarter of a century, and is an artist in his line of paper-hanging who never fails to give satisfaction, and his services have frequently been called into requisition by our most fashionable families. 

Mr. Glover is assisted by five capable and efficient employees. He is a native of Camden, and is extremely popular both in business and social circles; learned trade with Reed & Bro., has just admitted his brother H.A. Glover, into partnership. 

.JAMES A. DELANEY, GROCERIES, ETC., 
725 BROADWAY 

THIS well-known store was opened by Mr. Delaney about three years ago. The establishment is about 25 feet front by 40 feet in depth. He carries in stock a full line of 
the Finest Groceries, all kinds of the best makes of Canned goods, Sardines, Nuts Dried Fruits, etc. He also has a full line of Fresh and Salt Meats. 

Mr. Delaney has been in business in Camden about fifteen years; is a native of Guribar, Nova Scotia. He has in his employ five capable assistants, and one team for the delivery of orders. He is also a member of several secret societies, notably the famous order of Iron Hall. 

32

WILLIAM F. SANDERS, RESTAURANT, 
112 MARKET STREET. 


A VERY brilliant gentleman once said that a man should be happy when he has all he wants to eat and drink. N ow if this famous poet were at any time to drift into the palatial establishment of Mr. Sanders and taste his Stewed Snapper and his elegant Wines, we have no doubt that he would say, "O, what a pleasure it is to eat and drink!"

Mr. Sanders succeeded Mr. Lewis Herbst about a year ago; he has made many improvements since taking hold of the place. His building has a frontage of 30 feet on Market street. a,:d a depth of over 100 on the side street; he has a dining-room capable of seating over fifty at one time, and a number of rooms that are always filled with permanent guests. In the rear he has two very handsome Pool and several Billiard Tables. Mr. Sanders gives constant employment to ten well-trained and efficient 
servants. 

The proprietor has always been a citizen of Philadelphia until the last year or so, when he came to us to run the hotel which bears his name so well. 

34

W. H. ALLEN, WEST JERSEY STOVE WORKS, 
8 MARKET STREET 

THE subject of this too brief sketch is, with one exception, the oldest business man in Camden, and for nearly half a century has been honorably and prominently identified wIth the city's commercial prosperity. He established himself in his present line of business forty-four years ago, removing to the building which he now occupies, and which he built for the purpose for which it is used, thirty-four years ago. It is a four-story structure, with a frontage of 20 and a depth of 100 feet, the first floor being used as a salesroom, for the display of the magnificent stock of Heaters, Ranges, Tinware and Roofing materials, which are the products of the three large work-rooms upstairs. All goods sold are. manufactured on the premises, with the usual exception of Castings. Ten skilled workmen are constantly employed, and a team being used for the proper facilitation of business. 

The appearance of the place betokens energy, enterprise abd business tact on the part of the proprietor, who richly merits the large trade enjoyed. 

Mr. Allen is a native of Monmouth county, New Jersey; he is extremely popular both in social and business circles, and is prominently identified both with the Masonic Fraternity and the Odd Fellows' Society. Personally he is an affable and genial gentleman, and few of our citizens have such a wealth of information at their disposal regarding the early history of Camden as has this courteous gentleman.

The engraving which accompanies this sketch is one of Mr. Allen's specialties, and is known as the Model Novelty Range, without brick-work, which costs less than brick-set ranges, and whose operation is not dependent on masons' skill. All cooks and builders welcome it, it being the cheapest range to set made. Hot water and plenty of it can be had at all times, and it bakes every time. 

35

WILLIAM KAMINSKE, MERCHANT TAILOR, 
333 KAIGHN'S AVENUE 

VERY noticeable feature of these days of tasteful attire is the marked improvement effected in male apparel. Not only are the garments made in a. first class tailoring establishment to-day cut and designed upon exact scientific principles, but are fitted and finished with a degree of artistic skill scarcely dreamed of a generation ago. In this connection the writer of this review tenders a complimentary tribute to the 
establishment of William Kaminske, situated at No. 333 Kaighn's Avenue. occupying commodious and neatly appointed store, the dimensions of which are 20 by 36 feet is carried a comprehensive line of piece goods from the looms of Europe and America- all the latest novelties in fine goods, woolens, worsteds, serges, cheviots, cloths, 
cassimeres, mixed, striped and figured goods, and fashionable suitings in great variety.

The cutting department is under the personal supervision of the proprietor himself; this accurate fit and perfect satisfaction are assured, while every garment is subjected to close examination before bemg allowed to leave the premises- hence correct style, fit, finish and fabric are the leading features connected with this reliable house.

In the transaction of this enterprise twelve assistants are employed in and out of the building, and every are taken to guard the already highly won reputation of the 
establishment. 

Mr. Kaminske is a native of Poland; apprenticed to this useful profession in the old country, he came with a life's experience here and established himself in his present quarters in 1882, from which time he has won a liberal share of public favor, and merits the success which attends his efforts.

36

A. CORNELL, HARNESS MANUFACTORY, 
20 MARKET STREET 


THE manufactory of harness constitutes an industry which can not justly be overlooked in a review of Camden's business interests. The gentleman who is the subject of this sketch established the above business about four years ago, and in a well apportioned salesroom may be found everything in the harness line, from the finest and lightest carriage work, to the more ponderous working teams' outfit, all of which are sold at prices graduated to the varied uses and excellencies of the stock.

In the spacious workrooms, assistants are constantly employed and the work turned out is all subjected to the careful supervision of the proprietor, Mr. Cornell who is a master of the business in every detail. 

Mr. Cornell is a native of Pennsylvania, and highly respected in the community, as an energetic and progressive business man. He is prominently identified with the Odd Fellows, and the Knights of Golden Eagle, and is socially much esteemed.

CHARLES KALT, GENERAL UPHOLSTERER, 
29 MARKET STREET 


IN the business of Fine Upholstering and house decorating, few stand so high in the esteem of Camden's citizens as the modest, unassuming gentleman who is the subject of this sketch; he has been established in trade over thirty years, removing to his present neat and attractive place of business about five years ago. It consists of a well-lighted salesroom,. 12 by 18 feet in dimensions, amply stocked with Furniture, Furnishing Materials, Window Shades, Trimmings, etc., all of his own manufacture and design. Adjoining this is a commodious workroom, 24 by 12 feet, in whIch five assistants are constantly employed, a specialty being made of high class to order work, the product of this house, in many cases, finding its way into the parlors of our wealthiest families.

Mr. Kalt is a native of Germany, and is quite prominent in local societies, being connected with the Royal Arcanum, Iron Hall, Odd Fellows, Golden Eagle, etc. During the recent Civil War he was with the 44th Pennsylvania Volunteers and was actively and honorably in action in several of the leading battles, including that of Gettysburg; and he is a member of Post 5, G. A. R. Personally he is a genial, popular gentleman, 
who is highly esteemed by all. 

37

JOHN W. BROOKS, SHOE HOUSE, 
305 KAIGHN'S AVENUE 

THE subject of this review is a native of England, and in 1867 migrated to this country, and after spending a life's career in the shoe business, established himself in his present quarters in 1873, and has since become one of the leading factors in this mercantile field in this section, possessing the good-will and esteem of all with whom he holds business relations. The success of this establishment lies in the fact that Mr. Brooks knows his business thoroughly, attends to it personally and unceasingly, makes it his chief aim to handle only such goods as are sure to afford his customers the fullest satisfaction. Straightforward and honorable in his dealings, he is satisfied with fair and reasonable profits. 

The sales-room is 18 by 28 feet in dimensions, attractively fitted up and stocked with every variety of foot-wear for fashionable street and indoor use. The leading feature of the establishment is the custom department, 18 by 16 feet in size, where three competent assistants are employed in making new and repairing old work. A store-room, 18 by 12 feet, in the rear is used for storing superfluous stock. 

A gentleman of business capacity and uniform courtesy, he is highly regarded in commercial as well as social circles, and is a trustee of the Order of Sons of St. George, treasurer of Ancient Order Foresters of America, and other organizations, as well as vestryman in St. Andrew's Episcopal Church here. 

38

ALBERT SNYDER, OYSTER SALOON, 
335 KAIGHN’S AVENUE

AN establishment that has been familiar with the residents of this vicinity for a half decade of years is that of the gentleman whose name heads this review. Founded five years ago, at the number of 335 Kaighn's Avenue may be seen an attractively arranged Oyster Parlor, fitted out with all the most approved appliances known to the caterer of the bivalve. The dining apartments are situated in the rear of the saloon, and capable of comfortably seating sixty people, and which at times present the appearance of theatre and oyster parties. Oysters are served in all styles- baked, roasted, panned, broiled, fried or stewed. This popular resort, first-class in every respect, and one of the finest saloons of its kind in this section, is open for the accommodation of transient and permanent guests, from 8 A.M. to 1 A.M. To facilitate the affairs of the place, from three to seven efficient assistants are employed, and no lack of attention is paid to a large and select patronage. 

A native of Philadelphia, Mr. Snyder has spent nearly all his career in Camden, and in early life apprenticed himself to the cooper's trade, in which he has proved himself an experienced mechanic; relinquishing this latter pursuit to follow the oyster business, in which he has steadily occupied a leading and front rank among his contemporary purveyors. 

39 

CALEB PARREY, FLOUR, FEED AND GRAIN, 
227 MARKET STREET 


THIS gentleman has been established since 1850, and occupies a salesroom 40X20 feet in dimensions which is admirably adapted to the purpose for which it is used. Flour, feed and grain are the staple articles handled. In Flour, a specialty is made of bag trade in which form quite a large quantity is sold. Corn, oats, bran and cut feed are among the stock carried. 

The proprietor, Mr. Parrey, is a native of Lancaster County, Pa. ,and has been a resident of Camden since 1850. He is regarded as a business man of uncommon sagacity and energy and the goods coming from his place can be relied upon to be as represented. 

JAMES M. THOIRS, FLORIST, 
524 MARKET STREET

THIS gentleman established in ,business here about three years ago, having bought out C. C. Maple, who formerly occupied this stand about that time. His store room is 25 by 75 feet in dimensions, and is fully equipped with every necessary appurtenance, and containing a fine stock of Cut Flowers, Plants. Seeds, etc.; a specialty being made of working special designs, Mr. Thoirs being agent for John Gardner & Co., of Philadelphia. Two able and expert assistants are employed. 

The proprietor is a native of Scotland and came to this country in 1881. He lived in New York previous to his engaging in business here. Personally, he is very popular in the community, both in business and social circles. 

HARRY J. HOVEY, RESTAURANT, 
14 MARKET STREET 

THIS excellent Restaurant was established by the present proprietor in 1887. A spacious and inviting apartment, 25 by 50 feet in dimensions, is well equipped with every convenience, having a seating capacity of sixty. A specialty is made of 25 cent dinners, for which remarkably low price an excellent dinner is furnished; between 400 and 500 dinners being served daily. Able and expert employees are kept at work constantly. The proprietor is a native of Philadelphia, and has been in Camden for the past thirty years. He is highly respected, both in social and business circles, and is prominently identified with both the Odd Fellows' and Red Men's societies. 

40 

M. B. WEST, DRY GOODS AND NOTIONS, 
517 MARKET STREET 

AN extremely nice stock of goods is carried by this house, including Dry Goods, Ribbons, Trimmings Silks, etc. An attractively furnished store, 18 by 38 feet in dimensions, being fully stocked with the best brands of these goods obtainable in the 
market. 

The place was established by Mr. E. C. Troth, whom the present proprietor succeeded in 1888. 

The proprietor is a native of Morristown, N. J., and is admirably adapted, both by experience and excellent social qualities for a successful conduct of a business of this description. 

J. F. EASTLACK & SON, GROCERIES, 
738 MARKET STREET 

THIS successful business was originally established by J. F. Eastlack's brother, whom the present proprietors succeeded to its proprietorship in February 1882. 

A well fitted up salesroom, 20 by 37 feet in dimensions, is fully stocked with a complete line of fine Groceries, Canned Goods, Dried Fruits, etc., all of excellent quality. A special feature is made of Butter and Flour, an exceptionably fine quality being disposed of at a very reasonable price. Three competent and efficient assistants are employed and a team is used in proper facilitation of business. 

The proprietors are natives of Mantua, and are highly respected in both business and social circles. 

41

CHAS. J. LENG, PLAIN and FANCY CONFECTIONERY, 
223 MARKET STREET 

THIS is one of the most inviting places of its kind in Camden, being characterized by an air of cleanliness and neatness that is very attractive. It was established by Mrs. R. Leng, in 1866, coming into the hands of the present proprietor in 1886. 

The salesroom occupied is large and commodious and adjoining it is an Ice Cream Parlor in which Lunches, Oysters in every style and multitudes of good things are handled. A select and extensive patronage is enjoyed at all times 

Mr. Leng is a native of Camden, and is highly respected in the community. He is a baker by trade and consequently understands his business in its every detail. 

ANDREW CASSELMAN, SHOES, 
515 MARKET STREET 


A FINE place of business of its kind is that of Andrew Casselman, of 515 Market Street which is devoted to the manufacture and sale of Fine Shoes. 

A spacious salesroom, 18 by 36 feet in dimensions is at all times well stocked with Shoes, Rubbers, slippers, etc., of all grades and prices. A specialty is made of Custom Work and Repairing, the proprietor personally superintending this branch of the business in which a large trade is engaged. An able and efficient employee is kept constantly at work. 

Mr. Casselman is a native of Germany, and has been in this country since 1840. He is highly esteemed in both business and social circles. 

J. F. SHANNON, RESTAURANT, 
5 & 7 MARKET STREET 

AMONG those who cater successfully to the inner man, we must not overlook J. F Shannon, of 5 and 7 Market Street, whose two places taken in combination furnish refreshment in either liquid or solid food; the premises No. 5 being used as a restaurant, 
whIle· No. 7 contains a well equipped bar, admirably stocked with all the choicest and most approved brands of Wines, Liquors and Cigars.

The rooms occupied for business purposes are 20 by 20 feet each in dimensions, being connected by two ornamental archways, and present an inviting appearance, an air of cleanliness and neatness characterizing them. Two energetic and obliging assistants are employed. 

Originally established by John J. Willis, in 1880, the place came into the hands of the pre8ent affable and genial proprietor about six years ago, since which time it has won high favor as a well conducted and reputable resort.

Mr. Shannon is a native of New York city and a member of the G.A.R. Post in Philadelphia, an enterprising and progressive citizen and business man. 

THOMAS DALEY, WHEELWRIGHT AND BLACKSMITH, 
112 KAIGHN'S AVENUE 

As useful an animal as has the horse proven himself to mankind, his strength, in these modern days of utilarianism, would be of little avail, had we not some means for the 
protection of his hoof, thus providing him with an appliance whereby he can exert his strength and usefulness and be of service to his master. The avocation of making and fitting horseshoes is an important one indeed; no mere tape-line or rule can be used, and the success of the smith depends entirely upon a well trained, mechanical eye, to shape the shoe while it is yet sheening, glaring hot, and moreover an experienced shoer requires to know something of the anatomy of the hoof, as every horse requires distinct attention. 

For the successful prosecution of this work, Mr. Daley comes along with fifteen years of practical experience in his useful avocation. Established here many years ago, the present proprietor succeeded to the control of the establishment in May, 1881. The shop occupied is 17 by 45 feet in dimensions, with a Wheelwright Department attached and orders are received for anything in this line. New and repair work, heavy and light Carriage and Wagon work, in fact everything in the blacksmith line, Horseshoeing, however, being the specialty. Four men and three fires are in operation and an immense amount of work is annually executed. 

The subject of this article is a native of Camden county, and has won the confidence of horse owners as a reliable shoer. With every facility at hand, this is in every way a first-class establishment and its genial proprietor regarded as a first-class workman. 

43

W. S. STORY, FURNITURE, 
1125 BROADWAY

HERE is not a better known or more favorably spoken of store in Camden, than that owned by Mr. W. S. Story. The business was originally established by Mr. Albert Story in 1876 at 204 South Fifth Street from where the business was removed to 453 Kaighn's Avenue, and thence to the present building which was constructed for the purpose, and last year he was succeeded by the present proprietor. 

The building occupied is in area about 30 x 100 feet the whole building being occupied. 
A full line of all manufactured furnitute is carried. All kinds of the newest and most attractive designs in Parlor, Dining-room and Bedroom suits are shown, all qualities and prices from the finest to the cheapest grades. 

A specialty is made of the manufacture of Parlor suits, lounges, couches and hair mattresses, in which line few houses equal and none excel. The manufacturing is all done on the third floor, the first and second being occupied as salesrooms. 
When running normally seven skilled and capable workmen are employed, and one team is kept. 

Mr. Story, has always been a well known and prominent resident of Camden. 

44 

MRS. L. SCHUYLER, TRIMMINGS, ETC., 
815 BROADWAY

RS. Schuyler has come to stay, she has opened one of the best stores in this line in this part of the city. She has a very pretty store about 25 feet front by about 35 feet in 
depth. She has in her employ four very capable assistants. She has a full stock of every thing that goes to make a complete store in this line. All sorts of fancy trimmings, notions, hosiery, underwear, perfumery, ribbons and small wares. She makes a specialty of dress making, in which line she is very proficient. 

Mrs. Schuyler has always been a resident of Camden. 

45


ROBERT F.S. HEATH
OF THE SOCIETY MANUFACTURING COMPANY 

SOCIETY MANUFACTURING COMPANY, 
28 MARKET STREET

IN the production of fine grocers' specialties, no trade mark has become more familiar with the higher class of the trade than that which bears the trademark "Society," which is practically synonymous with purity, high quality, and artistic make up, in the preparation of the goods placed upon the market by the house under review.

About four years ago, the idea was conceived by Mr. R.S. F. Heath, that there was ample room for improvement in the matter of fact slap dash style in which "Specialties", to use a technical term were manufactured and offered for sale to the grocery trade.

With characteristic energy and enterprise, 'he called to his aid Mr. L. F. Delacroix who has been associated with him as superintendent, proceeded to put his design into practical form.

 The large building at 28 Market street was secured, and the work of adapting it to the form necessary, immediately begun, and with what success and energy it was pushed to execution. The handsome salesroom, the spacious laboratory and the half dozen smaller work rooms, occupied in the four story structure having a frontage of 25 and a depth of 100 feet in which are constantly employed over a dozen hands, will best bear witness. 


EXHIBIT OF SOCIETY MANUFACTURING CO., AT PURE FOOD 
CONVENTION, HORTICULTURAL HALL, PHILADELPHIA. 

46

It is almost impossible to give a complete list of the multitude of articles which are turned out, as any such list must necessarily be incomplete as additions are constantly being made to the list, as experience and request of patrons may suggest, but among those that have won the widest recognition are :- Society Ammonia, Society Russet Leather Cleanser, Society Strip Blueing for Laundry purposes, Society Liquid Blueing for Laundry purposes, Society Polish for Starch and Laundry purposes, Society Polish for Ladies' and Children's shoes, Society Polish Liquid for Stoves, Ranges etc., Society Shoe Dressing for Russet Leather, Society Polish Dry for Stoves, Ranges, etc., Society Pudding Powder, Climax Shoe Dressing, Society Soap, Society Concentrated Coffee, Society Gelatin.

Probably no citizen of Camden is better or more favorably known, than the owner of this establishment. A native of the town and a life long resident of Camden he has been 
prominently identified with every movement looking to the town's welfare, and his admiring fellow citizens have frequently thrust upon him official honors and responsibilities, having but recently completed a term in the New Jersey Legislature and at the present time being Camden's able and effective Recorder of Deeds. He is a member of innumerable societies, including the Masons, Odd Fellows, Chosen Friends.

Of course so busy a man as Mr. Heath is obliged to depend on his superintendent to a great extent in the detail work of the Society Company, and it is our pleasant duty to be able to congratulate him on possessing so able, affable and enthusiastically energetic a manager as Mr. L.F. Delacroix, who is never weary of singing the praises of "Society," 
or display with laudable pride, the Diplomas and Medals received from the Pure Food Society of Philadelphia, and the innumerable kindred organizations. 

47 

B. D. ARCHER, CIGARS & TOBACCO,
3 MARKET STREET 


PERHAPS there is no habit in which the American people indulge so much as smoking and this fact accounts to a considerable degree for the many bright and attractive cigar 
stores which the city of Camden abounds in, and none is more advantageously situated than that kept by Mr. B. D. Archer at No. 3 Market street, within a stones throw of the ferry. 

It is a neat and well apportid"ned store 25XI2 in dimensions and containing such brands of Cigars, Tobaccos, Snuffs, Pipes and Smokers' supplies generally, as have won the approval of the most critical. Mr. Archer being a connoisseur in this line. For the accommodation of patrons the morning and evening papers are carried, and every effort is apparently made to win its patrons approval. 

The store itself is among the oldest in its line in the city, having been founded many years ago by George S. Grant. The present proprietor who is a most affable and genial gentleman, has now owned it for a little over a year and his unvarying urbanity and attention to business have made him many friends. 

He is a high standing member of the Improved Order Red Men of Wyoming Tribe No. 55. 

N. BRION, RESTAURANT, 
40 AND 42 DELAWARE AVENUE. 

CAMDEN is particularly fortunate both in the number and excellence of her restaurants, and the man of slender means need never experience any difficulty in being well fed and at a small cost; but few places furnish so much excellent food for so small a sum as the establishment conducted by Mr. N. Brion, at 40 and 42 Delaware Avenue. 

The restaurant was established about eight years ago by William Clark, the present proprietor succeeding to its ownership last October, since which time he has conducted an admirably managed place in every respect. 

The restaurant is 20 by 28 feet in dimensions, and is neatly and attractively furnished with all modem conveniences, three efficient assistants being constantly. employed, and a surprisingly good meal is furnished for the small sum of 15 cents. An excellent line of Cigars is also carried. 

Mr. Brion is a native of Camden county, and well adapted, both by experience and social qualities, for conducting a place of this description, and well merits his success. 

48

W. G. SHEMELEY, MEATS AND PROVISIONS, 
307 MARKET STREET 

ONE of the most favorably known stores in this line is that of Mr. W. G. Shemeley. This courteous gentleman opened this establishment in 1887, and has met with great success since the opening. 

The store is about 20 by 30 feet in dimensions and fitted in the best possible manner. A large refrigerator occupies one corner. This has a capacity of 1800, and one 600 lbs. of ice at once. Here may be found City Dressed Meat of all kinds, arid a full line of fresh Fruits and Provisions. Five beeves are killed weekly as well as a great amount of smaller stock. One assistant is employed continually and a team is kept busy. 

Mr. Shemeley is a practical man, having had a life's experience in this business. He is a native of Mt. Holly, New Jersey. 

49

WILLIAM C. HANSELL, WALL PAPERS, 
203 MARKET STREET 


ONE of the oldest and most favorably known houses in this line, is that of Mr. W. C. Hansell. This business was established by the present proprietor in 1876, and has been under his own management ever since. 

The store is about 20 by 40 feet in dimemions, and contains a large and varied selection of all kinds of Wall Paper, Window Shades and Shade cloth. A specialty is made of large work and contract work. Estimates are cheerfully furnished. Six skilled workmen are constantly employed. 

Mr. Hansell holds a war record that is one of the best in the city, he having been in twenty-three battles and 18 skirmishes. Among the principal are South Mountain, Antietam,Vicksburgh, Spottsylvania, Cold Harbor and many others. He enlisted in 1861, Co. F, Fifty-first Pennsylvania Volunteers, and received an honorable discharge on August, 1865, he is an active member of Post 5, in this city. His admiring fellow citizens have just elected him a member of the Board of Freeholders, from the First 
Ward. 

C.P. BOWYER, GROCER, 
THIRD AND MARKET STREETS 


AMONG the many successful stores in Camden devoted to the sale of Groceries, few carry a larger or better line of goods than that under review. 

A commodious store, 26 by 30 feet in dimensions, is amply stocked with a stock of the finest and purest Family Groceries, including Canned and Bottled Goods Fancy Cakes, etc. Three affable and energetic employees are constantly employed, and a team is kept for delivery purposes. The patronage enjoyed is both select and extensive and an air of refinement and cleanliness permeates the entire premises. 

The proprietor, Mr. C. P. Bowyer, is one of our shrewdest and most energetic merchants. Prior to engaging in his present business he was interested in the sale of provisions. During the late civil war he enlisted in 1861, in Co. E, Fourth New Jersey Infantry, thus being among the first to respond to President Lincoln's call for volunteers for 90 days. On August 13th, 1862, he re-enlisted in the Fifteenth Pennsylvania Cavalry, serving until the close of the war, and participating honorably in the battles of Chickamauga, Stone River and Nashville, besides several minor engagements.

His present handsome and attractive store has been established since 1865  and is a model place of business in every respect.

50 

OWEN R. JONES' SONS, TAILORING
118 FEDERAL STREET


OLD-FASHIONED "tailor-shops" are among the things of the past. From a trade it has grown to a business ; one no more buys the cloth and leaves it with his measure at the tailor's, but goes to the mer­chant tailor, selects his goods, either in the piece or by sample, and the work is done without further trouble to the customer.

The business with which this article has to do was Started by John Ross in 1838, and in 1864 passed into the hands of Twoes & Jones. In 1870 Owen R. Jones became the sole proprietor and conducted it with great success until 1886, when it was assumed by Owen R. Jones' Sons, the present proprietors.

The business room is 20 x 16 feet in dimensions and the workshop 22 x 14 feet. An average of six hands are employed and the work is exclusively merchant tailoring. It is the oldest stand in the city and has a fine trade.

Owen R. Jones was born in Wales, and has lived a useful life, respected by his fellow citizens; has been a member of the City Council and Commissary Sergeant of the 6th Regiment Infantry, New Jersey National Guard.

John R. Jones was born in Camden, and is Captain of the Gatling Gun Company, attached to the 2d Brigade, New Jersey National Guard.

Owen B. Jones is also a native of Camden, and 1st Sergeant of the Gatling Gun Company, commanded by his brother.

The father and sons are all tailors by trade. Their place of business is at 118 Federal street.

51 


DERBY & WETHERBY, CAMDEN MACHINE WORKS, 
DELAWARE AVENUE & COOPER STREET. 

REPRESENT A TIVE industry is the Camden Machine Works, whose big building on the corner of Cooper street and Delaware avenue, is 50 x IS0 feet in dimensions, while the yard space controlled is 160 x 1000 feet. 

Originally established in 1863, by the present firm of Derby & Wetherby, a general business of its kind is satisfactorily handled. Repair work, dredges and machinery of all kinds is here looked after. Engines, boilers, machinery and shafting being made. Ample roof accommodations exist for machine work of which a specialty is made. The whole place impresses the visitor with a sense of vastness, and it is evident to the person who has no mechanical turn of mind whatever that he is in an establishment that stands preeminent in its special field. 

The individual members of the firm are Charles E. Derby, and J. P. Wetherby, the former a native of Massachusetts while the latter hails from the city of Camden. Both gentlemen are highly esteemed and regarded as representative business men. Mr. Wetherby, being connected with the Masonic Fraternity. 

52 

H. B. TWOES, MERCHANT TAILORING, 
138 FEDERAL STREET.

FEW words in compliment to one of the most reliable and capable of the local merchant tailors will not be amiss. In 1864 this business was started by H. B. Twoes, and was carried on successfully by him until 1889, when H. W. Twoes became the proprietor. Being a practical man, Mr. Twoes conducts his business- a large one- with success and profit, .and employs eight hands. The establishment does only custom or ordered work, for a numerous and desirable list of patrons, principally residents of the City.

The premises are a neat reception room of 16x32 feet and a rear workshop of 16x28 feet. The stock of piece goods and samples comprises about everything that is approved by fashion and the people. The cutting department is under the immediate personal supervision of the proprietor.

This place is admirably located at 130 Federal Street. 

53

G. F. CASSELMAN, BOOTS AND SHOES,
336 FEDERAL STREET, 


ONE of the neatest and most attractive business places in the city is the store of G. F. Casselman, at No. 336 Federal street, dealer in Fine Boots and Shoes- a general assortment for ladies, gentlemen and children, including slippers of all kinds and rubbers. The business was established by the father of the present proprietor in 1855, who was succeeded by his son in 1877. The store is 18x32 feet m dimensions, and the trade is of course chiefly local. Beside the readymade goods, custom work and repairing have their department, which is in charge of an assistant.

Mr. Casselman is a native of Philadelphia, and has been all his life a shoe dealer, consequently understands every detail of the business, and is able to buy and sell to the best advantage. He is prominently identified with the I.O.O. F. and the A.O.U.W., two organizations having a large membership in Camden. 

W. R. FEARN, PHOTOGRAPHY
326 FEDERAL STREET
 

THE art of Photography has been developed to a marvelous degree of excellence. In Camden one of the most reliable and successful of artists is W.R. Fearn, who has his studio at 326 Federal Street, where it was established about seven years ago by Mr. Fearn, who was succeeded by his brother, Frederick Fearn, who carried it on for six years, when it again came into the hands of its present proprietor. It occupies the second floor. The establishment is fitted up with every appliance for the execution of the best work. Four experienced and competent assistants are employed, and a high class of work has made the house celebrated. 

Mr. Fearn was born in New York, and has twenty-five years experince; has been in Camden eighteen years.

54

WILLIAM M. QUIMBY, HOME LAUNDRY 
828 MARKET STREET 


THIS excellent Laundry, which was established here only three months ago, has already won for itself a reputation for excellence that is highly flattering. The proprietor is both energetic and enterprising, and is a native of Camden. He successfully conducted a laundry in Bordentown prior to his opening here. 

A specialty is made of Lace Curtains and other fine work, everything being done by hand. Six competent and efficiceint employees are always at work and a team used for delIvery purposes. 

A. McCULLY & SONS, HARNESS MAKERS 
22 MARKET STREET

AWAY. back in 1860 Mr. A. McCully established the business which bears this name. The founder is now deceased, the firm consisting of his son, W.A. McCully and Eli T. Garrison, who succeeded to the proprietorshlp on his death, last September. 

The large three-story structure, 22 Market street, With a frontage of 25 and a depth of 110 feet, is occupied entire, and an extensive business is done, fifteen employees being kept constantly at work in its spacious work-rooms on the second and third floors. 

The sales-rooms and offices occupy the entire first floor, and are handsomely fitted up with samples of the stock manufactured and carried, embracing everything in horse furnishings of all possible grades and prices. Complete sets of harness or portions of a horse's equipment, such as collars, saddles, blankets, whips, sheets, robes, fly-nets, lap-rugs, etc., are here displayed in infinite variety.

Both of the young and energetic proprietors are natives of Camden, and highly respected in both social and business circles. 

55

F. ZENNECK, CONFECTIONERY,
314 MARKET STREET 


ONE of the best known Candy stores, both wholesale and retail, in this section, is that of Mr. F. Zenneck. This genial and courteous gentleman opened the business here in 1887, and has since become most favorably thought of. 

The store proper is about 20 x 30 feet in dimensions with a large workroom in the rear. All the candy is manufactured on the premises, and is always sure to be pure, as it is all under the strict supervision of the proprietor himself.

All kinds of candy is kept- Mixtures, Taffies and Stick Candy. When running normally, two skilled workmen are constantly employed. 

Mr. Zenneck is a native of Germany. He was a resident of Philadelphia for some time before coming here to reside. 

W. J. ROSS, HATS AND CAPS, 
433 KAIGHN'S AVENUE 

AMONG the many pioneers of this neighborhood, Mr. Ross has been as successful as any. Six years ago this gentleman opened a small store just opposite, devoted exclusively to the sale of men's hats and caps, and finding that the business was growing, larger quarters were secured two years ago at the present beautiful store. The store proper is about 25 by 35 feet.

Mr. Ross has been a life-long resident of Camden, and m the days of the old Fire Department was one of the many faithful watchers who looked so carefully after the house-owners' interest. Later he has connected himself with the Red Men, Golden Eagles, Odd Fellows, and the Independent Order of Mechanics. 

56

DR. W. J. COLLINS, DRUGS, 
451 KAIGHN'S AVENUE 


PERHAPS no physician in the city has a larger and more lucrative practice than Dr. Collins, and yet he finds time in his spare moments to keep an eye on his large Drug business. 

About three years ago he purchased the store from Dr. Haney, now deceased. A large store is occupied, the dimensions of which are 20 feet front on Kaighn's Avenue and 35 feet deep. All the fresh Drugs are kept on hand; a specialty is made of carefully filling prescriptions. A full line of all Fancy Goods is kept- all kinds of Perfumery, Soaps, etc.; all the best brands of Cigars, and a large Soda Fountain. Three capable assistants are employed. 

Dr. Collins is a graduate of the Jefferson MedIcal College, and is a native of Delaware, but has become one of Camden's esteemed citizens. He is prominently connected with the Masons and other organizations of the same character.

W. J. SILANCE, CIGARS AND TOBACCO, 
421 KAIGHN'S AVENUE 


ONE are more genial and pleasant than the well known proprietor of this establishment. He has a pleasant word for all who come in, whether they purchase much or little. 

Mr. Silance went into business fifteen years ago, and his store today tells whether he has been successful or not. The building occupied is 25 by 100 feet. A fine line of Imported and Domestic Cigars is :always kept on hand, and one thing sure to be, they are always fresh. All kinds of smoking and chewing Tobaccos and smokers' articles-such as pipes, cigar and cigarette holders are displayed.

Mr. Silance also holds a valuable position with the Pennsylvania Railroad. He is a native of the city, and an active member of both the Red Men and the United League. 

JOHN WESLEY, UMBRELLA MANUFACTURER, 
339 KAIGHN'S AVENUE 


THE sales-room proper is 18 by 14; feet in dimensions, with the shop in the rear, having all the facilities for the prosecution of this business. Several assistants are employed, and every means taken that will foster the interests of the patron.

A fine selection of genuine home-made Umbrellas, made from the best materials and guaranteed fast colors- gloria silk with gold mounted sticks, alpaca, mohair and gingham goods of every description made to order and repaired with skillfulness and dispatch. Engraving executed. New ribs, sticks, caps, and all kinds of repairing done on the premises, at prices low and considerate for execution of workmanship and materials used. 

The advantage of dealing direct with the maker is to secure reliable goods at a minimum of expenditure, and those in quest of such goods will consult their own best interests by forming business relations with the subject of this article, a gentleman of experience in. this direction, and a reliable manufacturer and dealer.

58

C. L. BENNETT, GROCER, 
93t BROADWAY

THERE is not a better or more favorably known. store than that conducted by Mr. Bennett. The business has been established for about three years, and has already obtained an enviable reputation for fine goods and fair dealing. The store occupied has a. frontage of 15 feet and a depth of about 40 feet, and is. fitted in the newest and most approved style.  

A full line of all Groceries may be found here- all grades of Sugars, Teas, Coffees, Spices, etc. All kinds of Salt and Smoked Meats, Hams, Tongues, etc., are handled extensively. All the Fresh Fruits and Vegetables, Butter and Eggs, are brought in every day. 

A specialty is made of Poultry, which is dressed to order. The firm handle Canned Goods to a large extent, which are all preserved by his own family, and are sure· to be free from all impurities. Three capable assistants are employed. 

Mr. Bennett has been a resident of Camden for the past sixteen years, and few gentlemen have such a record as he has. He is a prominent member of the' Masons and Red Men, and Past Grand Architect of the Independent Order of Mechanics. He was in Co. K, I04th regiment of Penn. Vols., and after serving three' years was discharged; he is a Past Post Commander of Post 37, G. A. R., in the city, and was sent by them as a delegate to the convention in San Francisco four years ago. 

S. K. BRAUN, TRIMMINGS,
1011 BROADWAY 

THERE are few better known stores in the city than Braun's Broadway Bargain Store. This store was. opened three years ago by the present proprietor, with the one Idea of small profits and quick sales; the size and well-arranged stock go to show how the people· have appreciated his untiring efforts.

The property is 25 by 125 feet in area, and contains a well-selected stock of Dry Goods. Notions and Fancy Articles are kept, and full lines of each one, no half and half business; all kinds of Hosiery and Underwear are constantly kept. 

Mr. Braun is a native of Austria, but came to this. country twenty years ago to stay, he thinks that there is no place like Camden to do business in. 

59

HARRY W. CAMPBELL, LIVERY STABLES, 
DELAWARE AVENUE AND MARKET STREET

ONE of the oldest established Livery Stables in Camden is the one now under review, founded by his father; the present proprietor, Mr. H. W. Campbell, succeeded him in its ownership on September 23, 1882. It occupies an area of 90 by 80 feet in dimensions, and is admirably equipped in every particular, having accommodations for sixty head of horses. 

A general Livery Stable business is done, including sales, hiring of teams for business or pleasure; also boarding, permanent and transient; eight skilled and efficient assistants being emp10yed, and every facility for comfort and convenience being placed at the disposal of the public, including telephonic communication with all sections of the city and suburbs. 

The proprietor, Mr. H. W. Campbell, is a native and life-long resident of Camden, and is deservedly popular in the community, for some time before his father's demise he was actively associated with him in the conduct of the business, of which his life-long experience has made him an adept. No better judge of horse-flesh is to be found anywhere, and it would be very hard indeed, to give this gentleman any "pointers" on the appurtenances necessary to a fine "turn out" These are the largest stables in the town. 

In addition to his business, the proprietor also owns Camden National Odorless Excavating and Fertilizing Company for cleaning wells, sinks, cesspools :and cellars, which has branch offices at N. E. corner Second and Federal streets and 340 Kaighn's Avenue. Telephone 147. 

60

J. G. COLSEY, DRY GOODS AND NOTIONS, 
NINTH AND MARKET STREETS 


PROBABLY there is not a better known store in this section than that of Mr. J. G. Colsey. The business here has been established but a short time the store was formerly located at 6th and Elm streets, and as the quarters were too small; these large and commodious ones were engaged. The store is known as "The Arcade," and has a area of about 25 by 50 feet, and is handsomely fitted up. Here may be found a very heavy stock of all kinds of Dry Goods, Notions, Hosiery, Underwear, Pins, Needles, and all the many and multitudinous varieties of small wares, as well as a large and varied stock of Boots and Shoes. Six capable and pleasant assistants are constantly employed. 

Mr. Colsey is a native of England, and has been a resident of this city for the past seventeen years; he: is a prominent member of the Sons of St. George and the Masons. 

J. H. LEON, CIGARS, 
208 MARKET STREET 


THIS gentleman established himself on Second street in 1882, removing to his present place on the 15th of March of this year. It is 20 by 30 feet in dimensions, and is well stocked with Cigars, Pipes, Chewing Tobaccos, Snuffs, etc., of a standard grade and excellence. The whole building is occupied in the transaction of business; three able and skilled assistants. being employed in the work-rooms in which cigars are manufactured, and sold all over Camden to the wholesale trade, which also includes all of southern New Jersey.

Mr. Leon is a native of New York, and came to Camden in 1875, since which time he has been prominently identified with the business developments of the city, being at the present time constable of the First Ward; is also a United States deputy marshal, and is a member of many secret societies. 

61

MICHAEL C. LYONS' SONS, MARBLE AND GRANITE WORKS,
N. E. COR. 8TH & MARKET STREETS 


THE above place of business was established fifteen. years ago by the late Michael C. Lyons, on whose demise last year, his two sons, Andrew M. Lyons and. Simon M. Lyons, succeeded to its proprietorship. 

Adjoining a neatly appointed office, 8 by 12 feet in dimensions, is the spacious display ground and working yard of the concern, which is handsomely ornamented with a display of the samples of the beautiful monumental work turned out. Every description of marble work is attended to here, including monumental work and building trimmings in either marble or granite. Ten skillful and competent assistants are employed, and two double teams are used to facilitate the transaction of business. 

The present proprietors are both young men of <energy and enterprise, who, by their life-long experience in this line of business, are admirably adapted to successfully conduct the large trade which they possess, being expert and practical workmen, whose subsequent success may be safely predicted. 

SAMUEL T. HART, THE TAILOR, 
225 FEDERAL STREET 

IT is an unmistakably favorable comment upon a man's methods when the increase of patronage necessitates an enlargement of his business facilities. "This has been the case with Samuel J. Hart, Merchant Tailor, 225 Federal street, where he stationed in 1886, prior to which time he had been at 120 Federal street.

Mr. Hart is an Englishman, and up to six years ago had the management of a leading clothing house in Birmingham. Leaving that position he came to America and worked at his trade, that of a tailor, on fine work. He is a progressive man and has found our institutions agree with him, and our customs suited his natural tastes. He has dealt fairly and been fairly dealt with. His friends and his patrons have multiplied and he has obtained the success he earned. He now does a large business in fine Merchant Tailoring and employs nine hands. The premises devoted to the ,business are a salesroom of 18 x 16 feet, a Cutting room in its rear of 16 x 16 feet and a workshop of 18 x 60 feet on the third floor. He has taken 1100 measures in two years. He is strictly honorable, and claims to the best trade in Camden. Mr. Hart is a civil, military and naval tailor- was for five years and nine months a tailor in the British navy. During his naval experience he brought from Africa a cape made of birds' feathers, made by a savage. Lady Cavendish desired to become its owner at any price. It attracted universal attention when placed on exhibition in Aston Hall, Birmingham, and is now the 
property of Mrs. Hart.

62

GEORGE W. SMITH, WALL PAPER, 
233 FEDERAL STREET 

THE wall-paper trade has attained gigantic proportions, and as it has increased in extent there has, been much more than a corresponding increase in the character of the work and the quality of the material employed. 

To observe the degree of excellence that has been reached in this department of industry, one need only call at 233 Federal street, and look over the splendid display that is always to be seen at the large and handsome establ1shment of George W. Smith, who carries the finest line and the biggest stock of wallpapers, wind-shades and oil-cloths m the city. 

The establishment named was started many years ago by Read & Brothers. In 1881 it was Read & Smith and in 1889 became the property of the present owner. 

The salesroom is ~2x80 feet in dimensions, and has the largest stock of these goods in the city. Mr. Smith makes a specialty of the finest work, and usually employs a 
number of hands. 

He was born here, and has been in this business 28 years. He is widely known and highly esteemed among his fellow citizens, for his honorable methods in business as well as personal merit. 

63 

MISS B. HERTZ, CONFECTIONERY, 
334 FEDERAL STREET 

MISS B. HERTZ is well known in this city and has for the past five years successfully conducted a large business at 334 Federal street, in Candies, Ice Cream, etc., of her own manufacture. There is no more popular establishment in Camden, though this is the lady's first business venture. The ice cream capacity of the house is 700 to 800 quarts a week. She deals also in Fancy Cakes, Water-Ices, Frozen Fruit, etc., and serves weddings, parties, balls and picnic, by the aid of competent assistants. Her experience has been obtained within a total period of twelve years. The premises occupied by Miss Hertz, are a main sales room of 16 x 30 feet, and a rear reception room that is capable of seating 30 patrons at one time. She was born in Cincinnati, but has made 
many friends for herself among the people of Camden who have during her business career extended to her a generous patronage. 

OSCAR H. GENTZSCH, 
BARBER, 812 BROADWAY 


ONE of the handsomest barber shops in the city is. that conducted by Mr. Oscar Gentzsch, who is. one of those versatile and talented tonsorial artists that. are so seldom met with. The present proprietor purchased the business in. 1885 from Mr. Haffacker. 

The shop is about 18 x 25 feet in dimensions and fitted in the most approved style. The chairs are kept. full all the time, and often many patrons are waiting for that welcome word "next." A specialty is male of ladies' and children's hair cutting. A full line of all kinds of cigars are always kept on hand. Three capable and genial assistants are always busy. 

Mr. Gentzsch has been a life-long resident of the City.

64 

 

S.S.E. COWPERTHWAITE, 
SEWING MACHINES, ETC. 221 FEDERAL STREET 

ONE of the oldest business concerns in Camden is that of S.S. E. Cowperthwaite, located at No. 221 Federal St., and well know n throughout the city and country. It was established by Mr. Cowperthwaite in 1840. The salesroom is 16 x 28 feet in size, has, of course, such adjuncts for storage, etc., as are necessary. 

The stock is large and varied, comprising Sewing Machines and Fancy Goods. Among the several lines of goods handled are Demorest's Sewing Machines, Demorest's Patterns, Oils, Needles, and a complete assortment of Sewing Machine Supplies; and, as a specialty, Humphrey's Homceopathic Specifics. One assistant is employed. 

Mr. Cowperthwaite is a native of Camden, and is by trade a steel engraver. He was, for three years, a member of the Excise Board, in which position he acquitted himself in a manner gratifying to his constituents.

K. E. McNEILL, TRIMMINGS
418 NORTH THIRD STREET 


THIS lady has a commodious and beautiful store of large dimensions, 25x40 fee~. Her specialty is Millinery. She has in stock a full line of all the latest styles and newest designs. Her business of Trimming Bonnets for special order is very large. She also has .a full line of Notions, Ribbons, and small wares. Miss McNeill gives employment to four capable assistants. 

She has always been a resident of the city. 

65 

R. N. ADAMS, BAKERY, 
521 MARKET STREET.

THIS business was established by Mr. M. H. Sachs,, and the present proprietor took hold of it about two years ago.

The store, proper, is about 20 by 35 feet in dimensions, and is fitted up in the handsomest manner possible. All kinds of Pies, Cakes, Bread and Pastry is turned out; many barrels of flour being used every week. A specialty is made of catering for weddings, banquets and parties of all kinds. A large wholesale and retail Ice Cream business is also carried on.

Mr. Adams is a native of Beverly, this State, and a thoroughly practical and capable man in the catering line.

F. A. SCHUSTER, WHOLESALE DEALER IN WINES AND LIQUORS, 
104 KAIGHN'S AVENUE

THE consumption of liquors in the United States is so vast that the trade necessarily involves considerations of the greatest importance. Among the reliable and influential wholesale liquor dealers in Camden the gentleman whose name heads this article, claims attention in these columns. Originally established as Schuster & Korn, in January, 1889, the latter gentleman retired and Mr. Schuster continued in sole proprietorship. The salesroom occupied for the purposes of business, is 20 by 60 feet in area, and is completely stocked with a fine line of Rye and Bourbon Whiskeys, French Brandies, Holland Gins, rich, old and mellow Wines of home and foreign manufacture, and everything appertaining to a first-class stock of these goods.

In connection with this, Mr. Schuster also prosecutes the bottling business. This department is situated at Nos. 1120 and 1122 South Front street, and in area is 52 by 210 feet. All the latest and most approved appliances are here enjoyed, among them being an immense wash machine for cleansing bottles. All kinds of soft drinks are here bottled as well as Lager Beer and Porter. An enormous amount of stuff is annually turned, out, and during the season 5,000 dozen bottles are shipped to the consuming trade every week.

For the execution of this immense amount of work, four men are constantly employed, and three teams utilized in delivering to the trade, all over Camden, Gloucester, and adjoining counties.

Born in Germany, Mr. Schuster has been a resident of this country since 1850, and spent upwards of twenty years at his present business. Prior to this he was engaged in the shoe business, and is prominently identified in commercial circles as a responsible dealer,

66

WILLIAM P. WEISER, PHARMACIST
501 MARKET STREET

A NEAT and attractive place of business is that of William P. Weiser. A salesroom 18 by 25 feet in dimensions is amply stocked with a line of fresh, pure Drugs, of unexcelled quality, and variety. A fine line of Cigars, Confectionery. Toilet Articles, etc., are also carried. A very handsome Soda Water Fountain is-a feature of the place. Two assistants are employed, and special care is taken in compounding physicians' prescriptions; one being a registered pharmacist.

The proprietor has been in the drug business over twenty years, establishing the present place of business in 1888. He is a graduate of the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy.

J.H. O'DONALD, CANDY KITCHEN, 
532 FEDERAL STREET

WAS established by W. W. Hollis, in 1889, who was succeeded two months later by the present proprietor. Mr. O'Donald manufactures all kinds of Candies and sells them all at retail. He does a thriving business that requires several assistants, and is transacted in two stores, the second being situated at the corner of Fourth and Federal streets. The absolute purity of all the products of the concern is guaranteed. Mr. O'Donald is himself a practical candy maker and all is made on the premises. Before establishing himself here he was, for some time, manager of New Jersey territory of the Singer Manufacturing Company.

G. W. HUFF, RESTAURANT, 
34 DELAWARE AVENUE

THIS cozy little restaurant, which its neat, cleanly and home-like appearance makes so attractive, was established by Mr. G. W. Huff about one year ago. It is 20 by 15 feet in dimensions and is very neatly fitted up.

A specialty is made of meals at the exceedingly low price of 15 cents, which, in point of quality and quantity, one equal in every respect to much more pretentious establishments. A line of the most popular standard Segars and Tobaccos are also handled.

Mr. Huff is a native of Philadelphia, and is highly esteemed, both socially and in a business sense. He is a member of the G.A.R. and of the Odd Fellows. In the conduct of the restaurant he is ably assisted by his wife, who is a lady of tact and business grasp.

FRANK P. MIDDLETON, UNDERTAKER,
319 MARKET STREET.

PERHAPS there is no calling which requires more delicate tact and experience on the part of those practicing it than that of the undertaker. When our hearts are surcharged with sorrow over the decease of our loved and cherished ones, it is comforting to see the last sad rites performed with the rare good tact and judgment which always characterizes the funerals conducted by this well-known gentleman.

Mr. Middleton has had a life-long experience in his chosen art, having been associated with his late lamented father. About fourteen years ago the present place was secured. The portion devoted to business consists of two apartments, which are well stocked with all the equipments of his mournful office. Caskets, Burial Robes, Mourning Livery and, in fact, everything appertaining to his profession are shown in infinite variety—are here for the inspection of patrons ; in addition to which a specialty is made of manufacturing to order anything desired. Mr. Middleton is an adept in the art of embalming. An assistant is regularly employed and a dead wagon and handsomely appointed hearse is used.

Mr. Middleton is a native of Camden and is highly respected by our citizens. He has officiated at the obsequies of many of our leading citizens.

C. TONNESON, CANDY, 
BROADWAY AND CLINTON STREET

ONE of the newest acquisitions that have been received is the store of Mr. C. Tonneson, at Broadway and Clinton street. The business was opened some time ago by Mr. Shapley West and the present owner purchased his interest within the past month.

The store is about 20 x 25 feet in dimensions, with a large and commodious dining room in the rear, with a seating capacity of about 40 persons. All kinds of fine candies are kept in stock, all varieties of mixtures, taffies, etc. All the the ice cream is manufactured on the premises, in the rear, and has already established himself in the public's favor. Three capable and skilled assistants are employed.

Mr. Tonneson is a native of Norway, and has been in this country for 16 years, but the progress he has made is very large. 

69

STEPHEN PARSONS
WEST JERSEY HOTEL

A WELL conducted hotel does much for a town's prosperity and it is pleasant to be able to bestow unstinted praise upon the leading house in this line in Camden, The West Jersey Hotel.

A large four story structure on the corner of Delaware Avenue and Market street, which has a frontage of 50 feet and a depth of 120 feet, containing 50 well kept sleeping apartments, while the cuisine is in charge of a competent chef who prepares daily the various del-icases of the table for the delectation of guests. The service and other accomodations being on a par with that of leading New York and Philadelphia houses.

Originally established by Israel English in 1850, it is one of the best known hotels in New Jersey. In 1884 the present proprietor, Mr. Stephen Parsons, succeeded to its proprietorship.

A native of New Jersey, and a hotel man for nearly half a century. Mr. Parsons was well equipped both by associations and experience to conduct this magnificent establishment and his success has been fully commensurate with his merit.

The bar is well stocked with the choicest brands of champagnes, wines, liquors, and cigars. Nearly 23 employees are required to manage this mammoth enterprise and the successful prosecution of the business reflects just credit on all concerned.

 

Pages 70 to 101


A. RUTHERFORD, HARNESS MAKER,
44 DELAWARE AVENUE.

THIS gentleman established here in 1886 and does harness making of all kinds, making a specialty however, of the manufacture of collars of which he is an adept. He occupies a neat place 15 x 12 feet in dimensions which is admirably adapted to his purpose.

He is a native of Novia Scotia, and is popular both in business and social circles, being a member of the Masonic Fraternity, and of the anti-Papal society of Philadelphia.

He is the maker of the well-known Rutherford's Universal Enamel. This enamel can be applied to wood, iron or leather that is free from grease. For restoring enameled leather, gum cloth or enameled cloth, wagon curtains or for old patent leather, such as saddle skirts, bridle winkers, dashers, ete., etc., It has no equal.

It is just what is wanted in every repair, Trunk, Wagon or Harness Shops. By its use any man can paint his own buggy or wagons. It gives a beautiful lustre to smooth iron surface ; such as smoke stacks, locomotive or iron machinery of every description.

It is the only Enamel in existence that works equally as well on iron, wood or leather. It will not crack, blister or chip off, and holds its lustre as well as new enamel.

It is impervious to water and a buggy top enameled with it will not require oil, and if properly applied ought to last at least two years. It will not work on oiled harness or shoe leather.

70

FRANK X. BRAUN. MERCHANT TAILOR,
124 MARKET STREET.

AMONG the many stores that have been established in the past year, few have been more successful than Mr. F. X. Braun. This estimable gentleman opened here last September, and has since met with great success.

The store occupied is about 20 x 25 feet in dimensions. Here may be found one of the choicest selections of Foreign and Domestic Worsted Suitings. Mr. Braun numbers among his customers some of the best and most stylishly dressed men in the city. Six capable work-people are constantly employed. Mr. Braun is a thoroughly practical man.

He is a native of Germany, coming here about nine years ago.

71

WILLIAM COWGILL, PATENT MEDICINES,
913 BROADWAY.

AMONG the most prominent stores in this section none have been more successful than Mr. Cowgill, who opened this establishment about three years ago with the idea of selling Patent Medicines at a small profit, and he has succeeded in demonstrating the fact
that small profits and quick sales is one of the best elements of business.

Nearly all the numerous reputable proprietary Patent Medicines put up are to be found in his place, together with Toilet Articles, Perfumery, etc., and all at very low figures.

The store is about 20x30 feet in dimensions and literally filled with the stock. A Soda Water fountain is also running to afford his many patrons with pure, refreshing drinks. Three capable assistants are employed.

Mr. Cowgill is a native of the State and has been an esteemed resident of the city for some time.

Though this business was established with no capital whatever it has been found necessary to open a branch store at 443 South Fifth street which has been equally successful, and the energetic proprietor contemplates opening another store.

WILLIAM H. HAEGELE & SON, MEATS AND POULTRY,
411 FEDERAL & 504 MARKET STREET.


THE firm of W. H. Haegele & Son has two establishments—the one located at 411 Federal street, the other at 504 Market street—both established in September, 1889, and already doing an immense business in Beef, Mutton, Lamb, Veal and Poultry in season. They kill all their own meats and consequently understand the virtues and value of their stock. The business employs the proprietors and several assistants, besides two teams that are constantly occupied. Their refrigerators have a capacity of 5,000 pounds of ice, and their meats, both fresh and salt, have a high reputation, founded upon their excellence.

W. H. Haegele, Sr., was born in Philadelphia, enlisted in 1861, before the Northern atmosphere was vitiated by unpleasant drafts, in C Company, 82d Pennsylvania Volunteers, and is a comrade of William B. Hatch Post, 37, Department of N. J., G. A. R.

W. H. Haegele, Jr., is also a native of Philadelphia, and has never been in any other business. He is a past officer of the K. G. E.

72

R.C. MASON, PIANOS AND ORGANS,
628 MARKET STREET.

AMONG the most prominent houses in the city may be mentioned that of Mr. R.C . Mason. The business was established by the present proprietor about three years ago (although Mr. Mason had for many years handled and sold various makes of pianos, for other houses), and has met with the greatest success. The building is about 25x90 feet in dimensions. The first floor is used solely as a piano wareroom, and the, second floor for organs. 

Mr. Mason was born in Camden, and has both worked and done business in this city all his life. When a boy he was put at the piano, and received a good musical education; in later years started as teacher, and by degrees drifted into the dealing and selling of Pianos and Organs. Through perseverance and honest dealings he managed to start in business for himself at the above address with a small stock of Pianos and Organs. 'The business has steadily increased.

Mr. Mason is the agent for many of the best makes of Pianos and Organs, among them the celebrated Sohmer Piano, Hardman, Colby & Co., Jacob Bros., Trowbridge Pianos, and the Story & Clark Organ. 

Within the past year a repairing and rebuilding department has been added to the already established business, giving employment to about ten hands. This new feature of the business has so rapidly grown that a contract has already been given for the erection of a handsome repairing factory. 

In the employ of Mr. Mason are six of the best workmen in the different branches of piano making that can be secured, they all coming from the best factories in New York. 
He is a prominent man in social, commercial and political circles, being a member of the band of Freeholders and Chairman of the Court House Committee. 

The illustration with this article is a reproduction of the famous Sohmer Piano, at present the most popular and preferred by all leading artists. 

P.J. .JORDAN,
S. E. COR. FIFTH AND FEDERAL STREETS. 

THIS house was established in 1882, and is doing a cash and installment business in Dry Goods, Furniture, Bedding, Stoves, ladies' and children's Cloaks, Refrigerators, Baby-Coaches, Boots and Shoes, Clothing, Hats, Caps, Jewelry, etc. The principal salesroom has a front of 18 feet by a depth of 60 feet, and the warerooms occupy four stories, the whole making with its large, varied and valuable stock an uncommonly attractive place. He was formerly in the employ of ,the celebrated Philadelphia house of Phil. J. Walsh, and commands a very large trade in Camden and adjacent counties, employing five or six assistants and five wagons. 

74 

W.F.C. H. NOTTEBROCK, CIGAR MANUFACTURER,
122 MARKET STREET.

AMONG the best known houses in this section may be mentioned that of Mr. Nottebrock. This gentleman purchased this business from Mr. Jacob Stokley in 1880. The store is about 20 x 20 feet in dimensions and fitted in the best manner. A large room in the rear is used as a manufacturing room.

The stock is large and varied, consisting of all the popular brands of Imported and Domestic Cigars, Smoking and Chewing Tobaccos, Snuff and Smoker articles. About 200,000 cigars are made annually by the three skilled workmen that are employed 

Mr. Nottebrock is a native of Germany. He came here in 1866. He is a prominent member of the Odd Fellows and other organizations.

C. M. FERAT, MANUFACTURING CONFECTIONER,
421 FEDERAL STREET.

THE business now carried on at 421 Federal street was established in 1876 by C. M. Ferat, who is widely known as a manufacturer of Fine Candies, cream chocolates, caramels, corn balls, all kinds of bar and molasses candies and all the articles known to the trade, including penny goods, prize packages, etc., for the wholesale and retail trade.

The salesroom is 16 x 55 feet in size, and the trade is drawn from all parts of the State. Three floors, constituting the entire building, are occupied for this manufacture , and six men, six boys and two teams are employed in the transaction of the business.

Mr. Ferat, is a practical man in the business, as were his father and grandfather before him. He spends much of his time on the road, in taking orders for the product of his works.
He is a director of Camden Cemetery. 

75

SITLEY & SON, FLOUR, FEED, SEEDS AND GRAIN,
128 KAIGHN'S AVENUE

THE City of Camden has for a period past, been identified with the flour and grain trade, as a distributing point to the consumer of these products, and her merchants in this branch of commercial pursuit, enjoy a widespread reputation for the facilities they have introduced as a means of supplying the trade with fresh and choice goods.

One of the oldest establishment in this section is that founded by E.B. Kaighn in 1879, and succeeded by the present firm in 1886.

The office and warehouse occupied for business purposes, stands on a plot 40 x 125 feet in area. Every facility is here enjoyed for the prompt handling of grain and feed.

The various apartments are supplied with bins, shutes, elevators, scales etc., and all the modern accessories known to the trade are here enjoyed, Telephone No. 48, being in use,
A heavy stock embracing fine family and bakers' flour in bag or barrel, meal, mill feed, oats, corn, rye, barley, wheat, and farm seeds of every description, as well as impliments. Oats are a specialty.

The trade is wide-spread and growing, and all the transactions are characterized by liberality and equity. In the successful prosecution of the business eleven assistants are employed, and two double and one single team, utilized for hauling and delivery purposes.

A. M. & F. B. Sitley, are the individual members of the firm, both gentlemen are natives of New Jersey, and prior to engaging in their mercantile venture, pursued the avocation of agriculturists.

Since establishing here, they are regarded high in commercial circles, as responsible dealers, progressive, enterprising citizens, who enjoy the confidence of all with whom they have business relations, and well merit the success attending their efforts.

76

CHARLES FOULON, CONFECTIONER,
524 FEDERAL STREET.

THE best attractions in choice Confectionery, Ice-Cream, Fancy Cakes and pies, with their due accompaniment of imported and domestic fresh and dried Fruits, Nuts, etc., may be always found at the very elegant place of Charles Foulon, 524 Federal street, established by Charles Foulon & Co., in 1886. About two years ago the firm was dissolved and Mr. Foulon became the sole proprietor. This gentleman caters successfully for balls, weddings, etc., and is prepared to supply banquets anywhere and at all times. He sells during the season an average of 1000 quarts a week of ice-cream. 

He employs nine assistants, and runs a delivery wagon in the interest of his customers. His salesroom is 18x28 feet in dimensions, and is a model of good taste and neatness in its equipment.
Mr. Foulon was born in Mulheim, on the Rhine, but has resided in America since 1868.

W. W. ARMSTRONG & BRO., PROVISIONS,
324 NORTH SECOND STREET.

THERE is no more prosperous concern in this section of Camden than that conducted by Messrs. W. W. Armstrong & Bro. The business was established about seven years ago by the present head of the firm, and later he took his brother in as a partner. The store at the corner of Sixth and State streets is a branch of this concern, started a short time ago, as the business grew too large for the up-town store.

Full lines of all Fresh and Salt Meats, Groceries, Canned Goods, Fruits and Provisions are carried in both the main and branch store.

Seven capable and genial assistants are employed. One team is kept very busy delivering orders. 

Mr. Armstrong is a native of Salem, N. J., but has been a resident of Camden for ten years. He is prominently connected with the Iron Hall Order of Tonti and other organizations.

77

WILLIAM

R. BENNETT

78 

WILLIAM R. BENNETT, MANUFACTURING JEWELER,
544 FEDERAL STREET.


WILLIAM R. Bennett is the proprietor of the establishment so frequently mentioned by the people of Camden, and vicinity as "Bennett's Jewelry Store," It is situated at 544 Federal street, and was opened, in October, 1887, by Mr. Bennett. The salesroom is 18x34 feet in size and is literally filled with a magnificent stock of Jewelry, Diamonds, Clocks, Watches- all the regular stock of a high-class store in this line of trade; together every thing attractive in jeweler's specialties, including an unsurpassed assortment of. Optical Goods. He employs twelve assistants, all of whom are accomplished and experienced workmen in their several departments. Repairing of all kinds belonging to this trade, forms one of said departments, and has done much in extending the fame of the house. The proprietor was formerly superintendent of the Keystone Watch Case Factory, for H. T. Muhr's Sons, Philadelphia, and has been in the jewelry business for the past 20 years. He traveled five years throughout the United States; was located in Chicago and made the biggest sales ever made in that city in one year. Was also, at one time located in. New Orleans. He is a manufacturing jeweler, and makes all Cuff Buttons, Scarf Pins, Marks and Pins of all descriptions and makes signs and symbols to order. He is the sole agent for the patent Tension Ring, for crocheting purposes. Six of his hands are constantly employed in the manufacturing department. His trade lies all over this section of the United States and keeps six men on the road, selling goods to watch clubs, the trade, etc. He is the only manufacturing jeweler in Camden. Telephone call 139.

Mr. Bennett is a native of New York City; a graduate of the Philadelphia Opthalmic Institute, class of '89, and fills with honor the position of First Lieutenant of B company, 6th Reg. Infantry, N. G., N. J.

His father, Mr. Simeon Bennett, was present at Inkerman, Sebastopol and Balaklava, and was the last survivor in this country of the latter battle.

79

G. B. ANDERSON, CIGARS AND TOBACCO,
SECOND AND ERIE STREETS.

SINCE the introduction of tobacco to civilization's folds the business of selling this commodity has become one of the greatest industries of this country, and among the many prominent ones in the city we would refer to Mr. G. B. Anderson. About two years ago he, seeing that the population was moving this way, opened his new store at the corner of Second and Erie streets.

The store itself is about 25x40 feet. All kinds of the best brands of Cigars and Tobacco are kept. A full line of Confectionery is also kept on hand and always fresh. Mr. Anderson employs two assistants, as he himself is in business in Philadelphia. 

He has been a life long resident of Camden.

LEE & CO., STATIONERY AND BLANK BOOKS, 
406 FEDERAL STREET.

MESSRS. LEE & CO., Stationers, Blank-book Manufacturers and dealers in Newspapers, periodicals, &c., are doing a large business. The place was established fourteen years ago by Howard Lee, but has been conducted by the present firm for the past ten years. The building has been enlarged and reconstructed three times within fourteen years and is yet too small. The salesroom has a frontage of 14 feet by a depth of 60 feet, and the firm has ample storage room.

A comprehensive stock of general Stationery, Fancy Goods, Toys and Bric-a-brac is carried.

There are three persons engaged as assistance in serving the extensive patronage, which grows steadily and comes from all quarters of the city. Howard Lee is the sole proprietor and is well known to the trade and the people.

Mr. Lee is a native of Philadelphia, but is satisfied with the prosperity he has achieved on this side of the Delaware and with the numerous friends and patrons he has made here.

80

THE D. LOUIS IRETON PAINT CO., PAINT & GLASS CO.
212 FEDERAL STREET 


IMAGE

THE D. Louis Ireton Paint and Glass Company is much the largest Paint Works in the city, and though only established in 1889, has assumed already an important position among the local industries, and bids fair to attain unusual prominence in this portion of the State.

The salesroom is situated at 212 Federal street, and is 16x30 feet in size, with an office on the second floor and a large cellar for storage. The company manufactures all kinds of Paints—the best for all purposes now in the market—both outside and inside work, tin, wood and iron. Every description of Glass, Brushes, and Family Supplies of every sort in stock, for wholesale and retail trade.

Five assistants and one team are now employed, and a continuous run of orders tests the capacity of the factory.

The individual members of the company are D. Louis Ireton, formerly connected with glass manufactory, and with the Pennsylvania Railroad, now Secretary and Treasurer of this Company; John E. Dawson and William Patterson, all men of undoubted capacity and skill.

81

GEORGE O. BORTEN, DRUGGIST,
900 N. SECOND STREET. 

THERE is nothing in which more skilled labor is required than that of a druggist. Mr. Borten has been' in this line for many years and has made Pharmacy his special study. He has succeeded in perfecting himself so well that he is known as one of the most reliable Apothecaries in the city. 

He purchased the establishment about fifteen years ago, from Dr. Ireland. The business has increased to a large extent since he has taken a hold of it. He carries in stock a full line of all the freshest Drugs, Perfumenes, Soaps and Fancy Articles of all descriptions. 

Dr. Walter S. Bray, one of the rising young physicians, has an office m the same building with Mr. Borten. 

Mr. Borten is at present Assistant Collector of the Port of Camden. He is a director of the Homestead Building and Loans Association, one of the staunchest building associations in the city. He is a compounder of several patent articles, Borten's Cholera Mixture, Borten's Pectoral Syrup, Borten's Sarsaparilla and Borten's Pellets. 


B. L. DUDLEY, GROCER,
1617 BROADWAY 

AMONG the best known houses in this neighborhood may be mentioned that of Mr. B. L. Dudley. 

This gentleman opened the business here about a year ago, and thus far success has been with him. The store is about 20 feet square, with a large refrigerator in the rear. A large and varied stock of Groceries is carried comprising everything in the line. Coal and Wood are also sold extensively. Butter, Eggs and Milk are made a specialty of. One capable assistant is employed. 

Mr. Dudley has been a resident of the city for the past fifteen years. He is an active member of the Red Men and the Independent Order of Mechanics. 

82 

MRS. R. BUNTING, DRY GOODS AND NOTIONS
1644 BROADWAY 

AMONG the best known and most favorably spoken of houses in this section may be that of Mrs. R. Bunting. This estimable lady opened this store some years ago, and has met with the greatest success. The store is a corner one with a frontage of 20 feet and a depth of 35 feet. It is fitted in the best manner.

A heavy stock of Dry Goods, Notions, Hosiery, Underwear, Ribbons Fancy Goods, and small wares is carried; in fact, all the many articles that come under this head. Three capable and skillful assistants are constantly employed. 

Mrs. Bunting has been an esteemed and respected resident of this city for the past thirty-six years.

Mr. Richard Bunting has been in the express business nearly forty years and is one of the oldest businessmen.

D. P. WILLIAMS, GROCER, 
SECOND & BYRON STS.

AMONG the prominent stores in this neighborhood may be mentioned that of Mr. D. P. Williams. This gentleman purchased the business but a short time ago from Messrs. J. Leeming & Son, who established it some time since. The salesroom is about 25x40 feet in dimensions and fitted in the best manner.

Here may be found a large line of Groceries—all Sugars, Teas, Coffees, Spices, Flour, Canned Goods, and the many other things that go to make a full stock. Fresh Fruits and Provisions can always be obtained here; special care is taken of this branch. Two capable assistants are employed.

Mr. Williams is a native of the State, and has been a resident of the city for the past five years. He is a prominent member of the Odd Fellows, Camden Council, L. O. R. C.

83

TURNER'S RESTAURANT
210 FEDERAL STREET 

AMONG all the refreshment houses in Camden none is probably more favorably known than Fred Turner's Oyster and Chop House, established by him four years ago at 210 Federal street. It comprises a reception and reading room in front of 16x32 feet, and a dining room in the rear of 16x12 feet. Oysters are served in every style, and the bill of fare includes Chops, Steaks, Cutlets, Tea, Coffee, etc., prepared from the best in the markets, by competent and careful cooks. A specialty is made of Fried Oysters. 

The trade is very select, and employs, in addition to the personal services of the proprietor, those of several assistants. The dining-room will comfortably seat forty persons at one time, and the business hours are from 8 A. M. to 1 A. M. 

Mr. Turner is a native of England, and by trade a ship carpenter. He has been thirty years in America. 

H. L. NORTH, TRIMMINGS, ETC., 
445 KAIGHN'S AVENUE. 

AMONG the many stores in our neighborhood few have been more successful than that conducted by Mr. H. L. North. This business has been established some little time and has met with great success. It was established by the present proprietor about four years ago. 
The store proper is about 20 x 35 feet in dimensions and is furnished with the best taste possible. 

Here may be found a very complete stock of Dry Goods, Notions and Fancy Goods. A special run is made on ribbons, in which stock there may be found all shades and widths that is desired.. Two capable assistants are given constant employment. 

Mr. North is a native of this State and has been connected with the city's best interests for some time. He is a prominent member of the Red Cross. 

84 

E. AUSTERMUHL, STOVES, ETC., 
526 MARKET STREET. 


AMONG the oldest and best known houses in this line is this one. The business was originally started by the proprietor's father over a quarter of a century, and the present owner succeeding him about ten years ago. It has always been known for its fair dealing and promptness. The store proper is 20 X 90 feet in dimensions, where may be found all the newest and best styles of Heaters and Ranges. A specialty is made of these goods, as well as Repairing and all kinds of Tin Roofing. 

In the rear is a large shop about 30 x 90 feet in dimensions, three floors, in which all the inside work is done. This is filled with the newest and best machinery. When running normally the business gives employment to fifteen skilled workmen, and two teams are kept busy.

Mr. Austermuhl has always been one of Camden's foremost citizens, being an industrious and prosperous business man. 

GEO. J. PEACHIN'S COOPERS POINT PHARMACY, 
SECOND & VINE STREETS. 

THIS is the oldest drug-store in North Camden, having been established in 1865. It came into the possession of its present energetic proprietor about a year ago. 

A handsomely fitted up store is well stocked with a complete line of Fresh Drugs, Perfumery, Soaps, Toilet Articles and Fancy Goods, together with a fine line of Cigars. A magnificent Soda Fountain adds to the completeness of the store furnishings. In the rear of the store is a well fitted up Laboratory. 

Mr. Peachin is a graduate of the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy, and is a young man of rare tact and business ability. For the convenience of patrons a stamp agency is kept in his place and an able and efficient employee is constantly kept at work. 

85


ONE OF MR. ERDMAN'S SPECIALTIES. 

86

D. H. ERDMAN, INDUSTRY STOVE WORKS, 
30 MARKET STREET

WHEN a business house remains in existence for over one-third of a century, as is the case with the present concern, it is pretty conclusive evidence of the merit and stability of the goods manufactured or disposed of.

It was way back in 1857, when Mr. Erdman established in business, and his uniform success during this long period is the just reward of merit and enterprise. A handsome three-story structure with a frontage of 25 feet and a depth of 100 feet, together with a big store house in the rear, is fully occupied by the business. The stock carried consists of a superb line of Stoves, Ranges and Tin-roofing materials of all grades and various prices. Ten competent employees are kept constantly busy and two teams are used in the successful prosecution of business.

Mr. Erdman has a number of specialties which he manufactures and of which he is justly proud, among them being the celebrated ''Giant Heater," "Junior Heater," and the "Combination Range."

He is a native of Pennsylvania, and is extremely popular, both in social and business circles, and is a prominent member of the Masonic Fraternity, having taken the various degrees up to No. 22 therein.

MRS. E. M. LONG, NOTIONS,
907 BROADWAY

AMONG the well-known and favorably spoken of houses in this neighborhood may be mentioned that of Mrs. E. M. Long. This estimable lady opened here about three years ago. The store is about 20x30 feet in dimensions, and filled in the best manner.
Here may be found a large and varied stock of Dry Goods, Notions, Hosiery, Underwear, Fancy Goods and Small Wares.

Three capable assistants are employed at all times. Mrs. Long has always been a well-known resident of the city.

87

ADAM SCHLORER, MEATS AND PROVISIONS, 
SECOND AND ARCH STREETS.

ONE of the largest and most favorably known stores in the city is that of Mr. Schlorer, located at the corner of Second and Arch streets. The business done is one of the largest and best in the city. The present proprietor purchased the business from Mr. Bachrach about six or seven years ago, and has since conducted it with great success. 
The store is 25 x 50 feet in dimensions, and fitted in the most commodious manner possible. 

A full stock of all kinds of Meats is carried, and here may be found the choice cuts that are the epicure's delight. Fruits and Provisions are always best as they come in fresh every morning. 

Four assistants that are capable and efficient are employed and two teams are kept to deliver goods to any part of the city. 

Mr. Schlorer is a native of Germany, but has been almost a life-long resident of the city. Mr. Schlorer kills all his own stock purchased in this State, Chester and Lancaster counties, Pa., and does a large wholesale trade. 

THEB. PINYARD, PAPER HANGINGS, 
406 MARKET STREET

ONE of the most prominent establishments in this line, in the neighborhood, is that of Mr. Theb. Pinyard. The business has been here for some time, the present proprietor having established it in 1878. The store occupied is about 20 x 35 feet in dimensions, and contains a large and well selected stock of Wall Papers. 

Many of the largest houses in the city bear evidence of the taste and skill of Mr. Pinyard. All kinds of Wall Papering is done 'as well as Fancy Decorations a,nd Frescoing. When running normally the services of six skilled workmen are required. 

Mr. Pinyard has always been an esteemed resident of the city. 

88

J. R. EASTLACK, GROCER, 
228 MARKET STREET. 

AMONG the largest stores in the city may be mentioned that of J. R. Eastlack. This genial and courteous gentleman, opened the business here in 1878, and has met with the most flattering success. 

This building is about 25 x 100 in dimensions, the whole structure being used. A large branch is also carried on at 4th and Elm streets. The main store is fitted up in the handsomest manner. all beautiful hard wood work being used. Electric lights and a steam power elevator lend comfort to the establishment. 

In both stores may be found a large and varied stock of Groceries- all grades of Teas, Sugars, Coffees, Spices, Flour, being handled; Butter, Eggs and Cheese being extensively sold. A specialty is made of Canned Goods, in which line the choicest of the market are kept. Nine skilled assistants are employed and three delivery teams are kept running. This store is the finest and largest in this line in this section of the state. 

Mr. Eastlack is a native of Gloucester county, but has been an esteemed and respected resident of this city for some years past. 

THE NORTH CAMDEN MEAT MARKET, E. M. FOX, 
SECOND AND ERIE STREETS

AMONG the many new houses in this section, none have been more successful than Mr. E. M. Fox. This gentleman opened the store here about six months ago.
The store itself is about 20 x 40 feet in dimensions, and is fitted in the newest and best manner. 

Here may be found a full stock of Meats and Provisions-all the choicest cuts of meat are constantly on hand, as well as a full stock of provisions, Canned Goods, Fruits, etc. 

Mr. Fox has been a life-long resident of the city, and has always been identified with its best interests. 

89


RICHTER EI.ECTRIC DYNAMO. 

90

RICHTER ELECTRIC LIGHT CO., 
117 N. FRONT STREET

IN the last few years the great demand for things electrical has so increased that many establishments of this kind have been started. Among the many, few have been more successful than the above.

This business was started by the gentlemen whose name it bears, in 1881, in this city, and in 1887 incorporated under the Laws of New Jersey.

The Officers of this organization are: Adeas Gordon, President; Charles Richter, Treasurer and W. Davis, Secretary.

This Company manufacturers every thing that pertains to electricity, all kinds of Dynamos for Plating and Electric Railways. They have a valuable patent on the railway and one of these will soon be running, experiments have shown that this is one of the best in existence.

One floor is used, about 50 x 90 feet in dimensions in which is shown all the newest and most approved machinery.

When running normally twelve capable and skilled workmen are employed. The officers of this concern are citizens of Camden and form an estimable triumvate of prosperous and industrious citizens. Mr. Davis is engaged in the real estate business. Mr. Gordon was formerly in the publishing business, and Mr. Richter is general manager of the establishment.

The Richter electroplating and electrotype machine possesses great advantages over all others, and the Richter system of lighting, invented by Mr. Charles Richter, includes both Arc and Incandescent light. The powerful volume of light that is produced by the former makes it especially adapted for exterior illumination or of large interior spaces, the latter is more suitable for household and general interior illumination. The Richter system covers both these systems of lighting and embodies many important and valuable improvements, by means of which much greater economy and simplicity of construction and higher efficiency may be obtained.

91

HARRY GERCKE, CONFECTIONERY, 
405 KAIGHN'S AVENUE

AMONG the best known houses in this section is that of Mr. H. Gercke. This business was established here by the present proprietor about five years ago and has met with the greatest success. The store occupied is about 20 x 30 feet in dimensions, and is fitted up in the best possible manner.

Confectionery in all its phases may be found Ice Cream made a specialty of, it being sold at wholesale as well as retail. In the summer season the average production is about 800 quarts a week. The workrooms are all located in the rear.A full line of Flowers and Plants is also carried. Three capable assistants are constantly employed, and one team is kept busy.

Mr. Gercke is a native of Philadelphia, but has become identified with Camden's best interests.

JOS. HERMAN, MERCHANT TAILOR,
1120 BROADWAY

FEW persons have established a better reputation than Mr. Joseph Herman. There is no tailor more favorably known than this talented and versatile gentleman. He and one team is kepot busy. is well known for his fair dealing and the good value that he gives for a small price.

The business was established by himself three years ago, and has grown to a very great extent. The store occupied is about 20 x 25 feet in dimensions, and her may be seen all the newest and latest importations that are possible to be shown. All the new Plaids, Stripes and Cheviots are shown in large variety.

All the work is done by custom made only. No stock of made-up clothing is carried. Three skilled workmen are constantly employed and sometimes many more.

Mr. Herman has been an esteemed resident of the city for the past three years.

94

WEBSTER KRIPS, MARBLE AND MONUMENTAL WORK, 

528 FEDERAL STREET 

MUCH of the beautiful monumental work which adorns the cemeteries of Camden and Philadelphia is from the establishment of Webster Krips, and a review of Camden's representative business houses would be incomplete without some reference to that gentleman's place. 

His office and show yards, 528 Federal street, occupy a space of 18 x 50 feet, the latter being filled with fine specimens of his work. Seven skilled assistants are constantly employed, and every feature of the business, which includes House Trimmings, Lettering, etc., as well as ornamental work, receives careful, personal attention from the proprietor, who has had an experience in his line of over half a century. The place he now occupies was established by Charles Kelley when Mr. Krips succeeded m 1867, and it is admirably adapted to the purpose for which it is used.

Mr. Krips is a native of Philadelphia, but has been m Camden, since 1867. Personally, he is highly esteemed by hosts of friends, in both business and social circles. 

HAMPTON E. WILLIAMS, HARDWARE, 
4TH AND MARKET STREETS. 

THIS store was originally opened by J. P. Fowler & Son, the present proprietor in 1885 coming into possession. The store occupied is about 20 x 35 feet in dimensions, and is finished in a most beautiful manner. A large and heavy stock is carried. All the petty details of his business are carefully looked after and as a consequence the stock is one of the best possible. All kinds of Builders' Hardware is kept as well as a full line of House Furnishing Goods. 

Two capable assistants are constantly employed. 

Mr. Williams has been a life-long resident of the City. 

95 


A. C. LAMAR

96

STANDARD WINDOW GLASS WORKS, 
OFFICE 9-1/2 MARKET STREET, CAMDEN.

THOUGH the manufacture of glass is generally supposed to be a comparitively modern invention or discovery, the growth for the last few hundred years or so, it is not so, but only a rediscovery, since the Dark Ages, of what was known and practiced in almost prehistoric times. Paintings of the reign of Osritasen I., at Beni-Hassan, representing glassblowers making a very large vase, show conclusively that nearly 4,000 years ago—before the Hebrew exodus, and before profane history commenced—the Egyptians were proficient in this art. In the arts, the word "glass" originally applied to all shining bodies, is limited to compounds of sand, potash or soda, and lime. Oxide of manganese, litharge and red lead are also sometimes used.

In Camden, the firm engaged in this industry is that of A. C. Lamar, of 9-1/2 Market street. This well know house manufactures all kinds of glass, both for building and ornamental purposes, including window, plate, colored, enameled, stained, fluted, ribbed, hammered, embossed, and cathedral glass, and also looking-glass plates, of the finer grades, this latter being a specialty. The quality is always kept at the highest standard, in order to compete successfully with that imported from France and Belgium. Bottles and glass hollow-ware of all sorts are also made.

The factory is at Woodbury, a few miles from Camden, and covers a site of several acres. The buildings comprise two large furnace-houses, a flattening-house, with cutting-room attached, engine and boiler-house, a pot-house, where the pots for melting are made, together with blacksmith-shop, packing-house, warehouse and offices, and the necessary stables, out-buildings, etc.

The tracks of the West Jersey Railroad run into the factory ground, by which means all the shipments are made. The entire plant is of modern improved construction, and complete in all details, with every requisite appliance for turning out the best work. The number of men employed is 150. Sixteen tons of glass are melted daily, and one hundred tons of coal and coke are consumed every week, about forty weeks constitute the working year in this industry. The output of manufactured glass per week amounts to about 160, 000 feet, averaging the value of $5,000. 

97

The process of manufacture begins in the pot-house where the melting pots are made. These are large vessels of about four feet high, and three and a half in diameter, and of the capacity of an ordinary hogshead, made of imported German clay, mixed with the burnt clay of the pots that have been used and worn out both clays being first reduced to a rough powder: 

These "pots" are heated before being put in the furnaces and then glazed with the glass known as "cullet", each furnace taking eight pots. The intense heat of the furnace renders the pots unserviceable after about 8 or 10 weeks. The molten glass, when taken from the furnace is blown into cylindrical form, and after ,cooling, taken to the flattening-house and placed on large flat stones-made of the same clay as the pots, which revolve on a table in the flattening oven. It is in due course cut, and when properly flattened, taken out of the oven by machinery. When cooled, the large flat sheets are cut with a diamond in the cutting-room to the necessary sizes, and subsequently packed and shipped. 

In addition to the manufacture of all the many and various descriptions of glass known to commerce, Mr. Lamar is a large wholesale and retail dealer in paints and painters' materials of all kinds, having always on hand a complete general stock of paints, dry and in oil, and ready mixed paints, varnishes, linseed oil, white lead, coach and house-painters' supplies, hard-oil finish, turpentine, glue, chamois, sponges, liquid gold paint, artists' supplies, and all other details pertaining to this line. In the item of white lead alone, 200 tons are sold annually. In both these staple branches this house is the representative one in this section, and en- joys an extensive and growing trade. The total value: of the annual production is about a quarter of a million. 
Mr. Lamar is a prominent citizen, standing in the front rank in both business and social circles. 

98

MRS. REED, CONFECTIONERY, 
419 FEDERAL STREET 

THE very popular and reliable confectionery store of Mrs. Reed has been known to the people of Camden for the past thirty-eight years. Of this long period the last thirty-five years Mrs. Reed has carried on the business at her present stand, 419 Federal street. Prior to removal to its present location it was at Coopers Point and Kaighn’s Point. The business is general Confectionery, to which is added, during the summer season, soft drinks. 

One assistant is employed. Mrs. Reed is a native of Germany but has been here forty-seven years. 

WILLIAM H. BRADDOCK, DRUGGIST, 
514 N. THIRD STREET 

ABOUT twelve years ago Mr. Braddock opened this beautiful establishment, that is one of the best appointed in the city. 

He makes a specialty of filling prescriptions very carefully and correctly. His laboratory is in the rear of the store. He carries in stock a full line of all Patent Medicines, Perfumery, Fancy Articles, Cigars, etc. The Soda Water Fountain is quite an attraction for the young folks in the summer time. 

Among the many specialties that come from the establishment are Braddock's Sarsaparilla, White Birch Liniment, Cough Syrup and Imperial Balsam. 

Mr. Braddock is a graduate of the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy. He has reached the thirty-second degree of Masonry, which means that he has spent many years in the organization. 

100 

GEO. W. TUCKER, WHOLESALE & RETAIL CIGARS, 
119 KAIGHN'S AVENUE

AMONG the well-known houses in this section may be mentioned that of Mr. G. W. Tucker. This courteous and pleasant gentleman opened this business about twenty years ago and has met with great success since.

The store occupied is about 20 x 40 feet in dimensions and fitted in the best manner. The cellar is used as a storage warehouse.

Here may be found a very heavy stock of this kind, all grades of Imported, Key West and Domestic Cigars, as well as a full line of Smoking and Chewing Tobaccos and Snuff. A large line of smokers' articles is also handled. The trade lies all-over Camden and the surrounding counties.

Three capable assistants are continually employed and a team is busy delivering the many orders.

Mr. Tucker is a native of the city and has always been favorably known and is a public-spirited gentleman.

AGNES NASH, 331 FEDERAL STREET, 
DRY GOODS AND NOTIONS.

WHEN a Dry Goods house is conducted by a lady the business is certainly in good hands and its work sure to be well done. All the complications and intricacies of the trade are simple enough to a lady, and no one can mislead her as to qualities and kinds of material in any given fabric.
Agnes Nash, formerly a teacher, has been established here for the past twenty-one years, in the general Dry Goods and Notion business. Her stock is very select, and is displayed in a salesroom of 14 x 28 feet. Two assistants are employed, and the patrons of the store come from all parts of the city, drawn hither by the high reputation that has been so abundantly earned by Miss Nash in the conscientious prosecution of her business.

101

Pages 70 to 101

Pages 102 to 150


J. I. CHALFANT, 
423 FEDERAL STREET AND FRONT AND ARCH STS. 

MR. CHALFANT, who is a native of Pennsylvania, and served in the late war for a period of nine months, with Company F, 124th Regiment, P. V., is also the proprietor of the Camden Carpet Cleaning Works at Front and Arch streets- the only carpet cleaning concern in Camden- has been so connected since 1884. The capacity for doing this work is 1,000 yards a day. Carpets are cleaned in all kinds of weather. They can be taken up, cleaned, altered and re-laid, and no charge is made for collecting and delivering carpets. Satisfaction guaranteed. He also controls a cracker trade which covers a territory of fifty miles in any direction from Camden. In the entire business four hands and three teams are employed. 

The Camden Carpet Cleaning Works, which has no equal in the United States. Don't go to Philadelphia to get your carpets cleaned at cheap prices when you can get them cleaned much better here. It is the best and most reliable and cheapest in the end. We will tell you why it is. It is more trouble to take up carpets and put them down again than all the other part of house cleaning. We claim then, that while you have your carpets up they should be above all things thoroughly cleaned, free from dust, moth and germs, before they are put down again. This you do not get from cheap work done elsewhere. Therefore we claim it pays you to have your carpets well cleaned at the Camden Carpet Cleaning Works, instead of half-cleaned at low prices elsewhere. You may think you are saving money by having your carpets half-cleaned at cheap prices, which is a grand mistake. We claim to give entire satisfaction, or no charges. We make no charge for collecting and delivering carpets. Send postal to office, 423 Federal street, Camden, N. J., and we will call for and deliver your carpets. free of charge. We clean carpets in wet as well as dry weather. 

Carpets taken up, cleaned and re-laid, 10 cents per yard. Carpets cleaned and re-laid 9 cents per yard. Carpets altered to fit other rooms by experienced workmen. 


THIS IS A CUT OF 102 

G. W. QUINN, BARBER, 
1647 BROADWAY


AMONG the best known tonsorial artists in this neighborhood may be mentioned Mr. G. W. Quinn. This talented and versatile gentleman has been here many years, coming in 1873. The business has since been most successful, as may be seen upon looking at the large array of cups and the neat little shop which he carries on. 
Two chairs are used, and the patient customers often have to wait for him to say those welcome words, “Your turn next, sir." 

Mr. Quinn is a native of this State. He is an active member of the Red Men and Seven Wise Men. 

103 

GARNS & CO., PHOTOGRAPHERS,
206 FEDERAL STREET

THE Photograph Establishment of Garns & Co. is one of the leading art concerns in the county. It is situated at 206 Federal street, and is 16x75 feet in dimensions. All the appointments are in keeping with the character and style of the business, and embrace all the modern appliances of the art, and is complete in every department for the work that is to.be done. The proprietor is a practical man of thirty years' experience and gives his personal attention to the business, besides employing four accomplished 'assistants. He has been in this building since February, 1889. The trade of this house is very large and is found among the best people who reside or visit in Camden. 

Mr. Garns' experience includes four years as photographer in the United .States Navy and an. acquaintance with the busmess in Philadelphia, acquired while acting as chief operator in several of the leading galleries. In these varied experiences he has made many friends and hosts of acquaintances and patrons, who prefer his work above all others. 

A. B. C. SMITH, CIGARS,
1736 BROADWAY 


LOVERS of a good Cigar like to congregate where -" such an article can be obtained, and among the prominent places of that kind in this section may be mentioned that of Mr. Smith. The store is about 20X30 feet in dimensions, with a sitting room back. 

A large and choice selection of Imported and Domestic Cigars can be obtained here, as well as a fine line of Smoking and Chewing Tobaccos, Cigarettes, Pipes and Smokers' Articles. 

Mr. Smith is a native of the City, and has always been prominent in looking towards the city's best interests. He formerly held the position of police officer in this district. 

D. H. GOMERSALL, GENERAL STORE, 
512 & 514 MARKET STREET

AMONG the largest and best known houses may be mentioned that of Mr. D. H. Gomersall. This gentleman established business here about six years ago, and to-day has one of the largest and handsomest stores in the city. The store is about 50x120 feet in dimensions and fitted in the best manner. A large and varied stock is carried.

All kinds of Men's, Ladies', Misses' and Children's Boots and Shoes are handled; Dry Goods, Notions, Hosiery, Underwear, Millinery and Fancy Goods of all kinds and descriptions are handled extensively. Hats, Caps, Trunks, Valises and Gent's Furnishing Goods also form another large department. When running at full business, ten capable assistants are employed.

Mr. Gomersall is a native of Philadelphia, and has always been in this line and is a thoroughly, practical and industrious man. The store is one of the largest of the kind in the city.

KELLYS, TAILORS, 
214 MARKET STREET.

AMONG the most prominent houses in this line may be mentioned that of Messrs. Kelly. These gentlemen purchased this business last fall from Mr. Jas. B. Wasielewski.

The store is about 20 x 30 feet in dimensions, and fitted in the best manner. Here may be found a choice selection of Imported and Domestic Fabrics for men's wear. This store is a branch of their main business located at 142 and 144 North Ninth St., Philadelphia. All clothing is made at the Philadelphia store, where eighty capable and skilled work-people are constantly employed

Mr. Kelly, Sr., and five sons are employed in the business, and it is one of the largest in Philadelphia.

105

MEARNS & SMALLWOOD, MANUFACTURERS OF CIGARS, 
17 KAIGHN'S AVENUE

AMONG the well-known houses in this neighborhood none have become more popular than that of Messrs. Mearns & Smallwood. These gentlemen opened this establishment in January, 1888, and have met with great success. Their trade lies all over the city; fine retail and the drug store trade being made a specialty of.

The store is about 10x20 feet in dimensions and fitted in the most approved manner. The shop is located in the rear.

Among the many special brands put up by this firm are the "El Mundo," Undine, Full Value, Dona Favorita and Key West Extra. The firm is many times unable to fill their orders, as these brands have become very popular and are in steady demand.

The capacity of the factory is about 15,000 per month. Four skillful workmen are employed.

J. B. Mearns is a native of New York city, and a salesman for the firm. Wm H. Smallwood is a cigarmaker by trade, and has charge of the factory.

THOS. A. IRWIN, MERCHANT TAILOR, 
316 MARKET STREET

ONE of the most prominent Tailors in his neighborhood is that courteous and genial gentleman, Mr. T. A. Irwin. This business was opened by himself, in 1890, and has met with the greatest success. Many of the best dressed men in town purchase their clothes from him. In his stock is always to be found the newest and most attractive novelties, both of imported and domestic manufacture. The work rooms are up stairs, and when running normally six skillful workmen are given constant employment.

Mr. Irwin is a native of Ireland, and has been an-esteemed and respected resident of the city for the past, fifteen years.

106

W. B. CLINE & BRO., CIGARS,
FIFTH AND STEVENS STREETS.

AMONG the many stores in Camden few are more favorably known than that of Messrs. W.B. Cline & Bro. The business was established under the same name about five years ago for the sale of Cigars, etc. Three years later they commenced to manufacture, and have one of the largest capacities in the city now.

The store proper is on the corner of 5th and Stevens streets, with a frontage of 25 feet on 5th street and a depth of over 100 feet on Stevens street. It is finished in the best manner and fitted very nicely.

Here may be found one of the choicest and varied stocks of Cigars in the city. All grades of Imported, Key West and Domestic manufacture being kept, as well as a. large stock of 

Smoking and Chewing Tobaccos and Smokers' Articles.

The factory is in the rear. Six skilled workmen are employed and the firm have the capacity to turn out about 30,000 Cigars a month.

Both members of the firm are natives of this State and have been prominent residents of the city for the past five years.

JOHN McCREA, CIGARS,
1602 BROADWAY

THE store is about 20x20 feet in dimensions and A nicely fitted. A large stock of Cigars, Smoking, and Chewing Tobaccos, Cigarettes and Smokers' Articles is handled. All the Weekly and Monthly Periodicals are sold.

He is a native of Wilmington, Del., but has become a well-known resident of this section.

107

R. S. BENDER & SON, STATIONERS
212 MARKET STREET

AMONG the most widely known houses in this section may be mentioned that of Messrs. R. S. Bender & Son. This business was started about thirty-five years ago by Mr. Robert S. Bender, and his son was taken into the firm a short time ago.

The store is about 20 x 30 feet in dimensions. Here may be found a large and varied stock of Stationery, Blank Books and Fancy Goods. A large Bindery is attached, in which line a good business is done. Ten capable assistants are constantly employed.

The individual members of the firm are Robert S. Bender and R. I. Bender.

Mr. Robert S. Bender is at present Chief of the Fire Department. He was in the late war, and has always been a popular and well-known resident of the city.

B. F. BOULTON, SHOE FINDINGS, 
504 KAIGHN'S AVENUE.

ONE of the oldest establishments in this line is that of Mr. Boulton, who may almost be called the pioneer in this line, he having been here for the past twelve years, and the only store in the section that is devoted exclusively to Shoe Findings.

The store occupied is about 20x30 feet in dimensions, and constantly well filled with a varied stock. Here all grades of Morocco, Calf and Oak feathers are to be found, as well as all the tools that are required for all the shoe trade.

In the odd moments some repairing is done by Mr. Boultou, in which line he is a practical and skilled workman. 

Two capable and well-known assistants are employed.

Mr. Boulton is a native of the State, and has been an esteemed resident of the city for the past twenty-five years.

108

J. HOLLADAY, BAKER AND GROCER, 
506 FEDERAL STREET

IT is a pleasure to commend that which is commendable. The Bakery and Grocery Store owned and conducted by J. Holladay, with a corps of eight assistants and two delivery wagons, is one of the best and most reliable business houses in this city, with a large local trade and a patronage drawn from among the best people of Camden. This excellent establishment was founded by the present proprietor fourteen years ago, and has for the past seven years been carried on at 506 Federal street. The salesroom is 14x24 feet in dimensions, and is one of the best kept stores in the city. The work is Plain and Fancy Cakes and a splendid quality of Bread, and catering for balls, parties and picnics. The Grocery Department is devoted to fine family goods carefully selected for their fine quality.
Mr. Holladay was born in Salem County, and was originally a carpenter by occupation, but has now for many years been identified with his present business.
This gentleman was the first to introduce their Home Made Bread and Pies in Camden, which is prepared according to a special receipt and is of unusual excellence.

MRS. WILLIAM L. DUVAL, CIGAR AND NEWSDEALER, 
321 MARKET STREET.

THIS business was established fifteen years ago by Mr. Duval, on whose decease in 1887, the present proprietress came into its possession.
A very large stock of Cigars, Tobacco and Smokers' Supplies are constantly kept on hand, in addition to which a line of Periodicals, Stationer}', etc., is also carried.
The proprietress, who is a native of Ireland, has been in this country for 25 years. She is an energetic, enterprising business lady, who richly merits the success she has attained in business.

109

GEORGE WAILES, SHOES, 
64 N. SECOND STREET.

THE proprietor is a practical shoe manufacturer, having been foreman for the largest factory in Newark, N. J., for sixteen years. He established in Camden about seven }-ears ago, in a store about 20x30 feet in dimensions, with a workroom in the rear, where all the shoes offered for sale are made.

Mr. Wailes has lived in various parts of the State for nearly half a century, and has hosts of friends in all sections of the Commonwealth.

He is a prominent member of the Odd Fellows, a member of the Grand Encampment, and also of the Grand Lodge, and Captain in the Patriarchs Militant, and Aide-de-camp to the Commander of the Department of New Jersey. He was one of the founders of Columbian Lodge, No. 117, of Newark, N. J., which is the largest lodge of the Odd Fellows in this State ; was also connected with the first lodge founded by the "Daughters of Rebecca, over a quarter of a century ago, and still active in that branch of Odd Fellowship.

WILLIAM J. HAINES, OYSTERS,
1150 BROADWAY.

'THIS gentleman established himself in business here •I about six years ago, and in a neatly fitted up Dining Room, 20x50 feet in dimensions, and with a • capacity of seating about sixty persons. In the season Mr. Haines makes a specialty of his Oysters, which he serves to a number of families, as well as to the trade which he has coming to the store to get their lunches. In the summer season he has one of the largest Ice Cream businesses in the city, selling as much as a 'thousand quarts a week when the weather is favorable. This is sold not only to the consumer but at wholesale as well as retail. All this is manufactured on the premises on the rear. All kinds of Confectionery are also kept in constant stock.
Mr. Haines gives employment to eight assistants. He is a native of the State of New Jersey and is prominently connected with the Masons and Red Men.

110

A. J. VAN ZANT, GROCER, 
1803 BROADWAY.

AMONG the best known houses in this line in this section may be mentioned that of Mr. A. J. Van Zant. This genial and courteous gentleman opened business here about four years ago. The store occupied is about 20x25 feet in dimensions. A large and complete line of Groceries, Soaps, Teas, Coffees, Spices, etc., as well as a large line of Glassware and Crockery.

Two capable assistants are employed.

Mr. Van Zant is a native of the State and has always been an active and industrious citizen. He is a prominent member of the American Legion of Honor.

ANTHONY'S CHINA HALL,
BROADWAY AND KAIGHN'S AVENUE

ONE of the oldest and most favorably thought of houses in this neighborhood is Anthony's China Hall, this business having been here many years, the present proprietor's son, H. B. Anthony, having established the business in 1868, and the present proprietor took hold of it January I4th, 1878.

The store is about 20x80 feet in dimension. Two floors are used as show rooms. Here may be found one of the most complete stocks in the city. All kinds and descriptions of China and Glassware abound as well as a large Lamp Department, in which may be found all the newest and handsomest designs, as well as a full line of Lamp Fittings. A large House Furnishing Goods Department is also run, in which everything of the kind may be found.

Six capable and genial assistants are employed. The Store is fitted with electric lights and is one of the handsomest in this section.

Mr. Anthony is a native of Northumberland, Northumberland County, Pa., but has been a resident of the city thirty-five years.

111

T.L. BEAR, JEWELER
204 MARKET STREET

THIS gentleman purchased this business about twelve years ago from Mr. Hiess. The store is about 20 x 20 feet in dimensions, is fitted in the neatest and most commodious manner.
The stock consists of all kinds of Watches, Clocks, Rings, Silverware, and the many other things in this line. A special feature is made of Fine Repairing, which is executed in the best manner. Three capable assistants are always employed.

Mr. Bear has been a life-long resident of the city and has always been prominently known in the Jewelry-trade.

JOS. S. SHUSTER, MEATS & PROVISIONS, 
1730 BROADWAY.

AMONG the most favorably known stores of this kind in this neighborhood may be mentioned that of Mr. Joseph S. Sinister. This gentleman purchased the business about three years ago from Mr. Mills, and has since had it under his own management.

The store is about 20x35 feet in dimensions and fitted in the best manner. A large refrigerator occupies one corner. A large stock of Meats, both Salt and Fresh, may be found here, as well as Canned Goods, Fresh Fruits and Provisions, in large variety. Two assistants are constantly employed.

Mr. Shuster is a native of Gibbstown, N. J., but has been an esteemed resident of the city for some time past.

112

A DOUBLE ESTABLISHMENT

Of the most attractive houses devoted to business in this city is that at 317 Federal street. Two distinct lines of business, both largely artistic in their character, are successfully carried on upon these premises. It is here that Mrs. Julia A. Turner fills all orders from a numerous clientage for her work as a preserver and embalmer of natural flowers and manufacturer of every description of human hair goods, and makes a specialty of funeral designs in-wax, and deals in picture frames, mirrors, etc. And here is the office of the Commercial Printing House.

Mrs. Turner is a Pennsylvanian by birth. She came here and started this business twelve years ago, and has occupied this stand about five years. The salesroom and office is 16x20 feet in size, and is as pretty as a picture.

The Commercial Printing House publishes Turner's Base Ball Guide, Camden Street Car Guide, and does all kinds of commercial and specialty printing, for which work its appliances are complete. Eugene M. Turner, the proprietor, is by trade a practical printer. E. M. Turner, Sr., is an electrician by profession, and is prepared at all times to attend to repairing and adjusting electrical apparatus.

J. W. LIVINGSTONE, CIGARS AND CONFECTIONERY, 
571 FERRY AVENUE.

AMONG the many houses in this section, none have become more favorably known than that of Mr. J. W. Livingstone. This gentleman succeeded his mother, who went out of business about three months ago. 

The store is about 20x25 feet in dimensions. A full line of Confectionery is carried, as well as a large line of Cigars, Smoking and Chewing Tobaccos. Two capable and industrious assistants are employed in the business.

Mr. Livingstone has been an esteemed resident for many years.

113

J. HYERS, NOTIONS, 
800 BROADWAY

THIS establishment is one of the largest and handsomest of its character in the city. The business here was opened by the present proprietor in 1887, they having formerly been located at Third and Chestnut streets.

The store occupied is about 25x35 feet in dimensions. Full lines of Dress Goods, Dry Goods, Notions, Hosiery and Underwear may be found here, as well as all the smaller articles, such as Perfumery, Embroidery Materials and Fancy Goods.

A specialty is made of Dress Making, in which line this firm has become known as one of the first in the city; the finest kind of Dress and Muslin Underwear being turned out by this concern. Four capable and skilled assistants are employed
constantly.

The proprietor is a native of Long Branch but has been here for the last fifteen years.

WILLIAM DONALDSON, TOBACCO, CIGARS AND FANCY GOODS, 
219 FEDERAL STREET

THE business partially described in the above caption, was established at its present location, No. 219 Federal street, by the proprietor, William Donaldson, in May, 1888. By fair and honorable methods the trade has been brought to a rather unusual degree of prosperity, and the place now commands a large and increasing patronage. The neat salesroom is 16x18 feet in dimensions, and has a fine stock of Tobacco, Cigars, Toys, Musical Instruments, Stationery, Base Ball Goods, Novels, Fancy Goods, etc., and employs one assistant.

Mr. Donaldson was born in New York City, and has had a varied experience in life. He was formerly captain and owner of four barges and handled railroad ties and general freight in Southern waters, for eight years—previously ran to Albany and Troy, N. Y., and eastern ports. In 1861 he enlisted in the regular army and served there three years.

114

L. W. FERNAN, MEATS AND PROVISIONS, 
407 KAIGHN'S AVENUE.

PROBABLY there is no larger or better known dealer in his line than the genial Mr. Fernan. About eight years ago he established this business at 338 Kaighn's avenue, and has increased at such a rate that he was forced to secure larger quarters, and he opened the present store, and later, the branch at 237 Kaighn's avenue.

At both stores a full stock is kept of all kinds of Fresh and Salt Meats, Fruits, Vegetables, Canned Goods, Butter, Eggs, etc.

Mr. Fernan gives employment to four capable and genial assistants, that are ever ready to look after his interests. The enormous business done makes it necessary for him to have a team that is going constantly.

Mr. Fernan is a native of Delaware, but has identified himself with the interests of Camden. He is very prominent in the various organizations to which he belongs, among others the Red Men, Mystic Chain, Fidelity Lodge, A. O. U. W., and many other social organizations.

MRS. S. BESSER, GROCER, 
665 FERRY AVENUE.

ONE of the most prominent stores in this liije in this neighborhood is that of Mrs. S. Besser. This estimable lady purchased the business from Mr. Harman about a year ago, and has since met with much success.

The store occupied is about 20x25 feet in dimensions. A large stock of Groceries is carried— all kinds of Teas, Coffees, Sugars, Spices and Canned Goods being kept. A small stock of Confectionery is also handled for the little ones. A good business is done in the Coal and Wood line.

Mrs. Besser is a native of Mt. Ephraim. She has been a much-liked resident of this section for some time.

115


MRS. FULTS WHO HAS BEEN IN BUSINESS AT HER 
PRESENT LOCATION OVER A QUARTER OF A CENTURY

116

MRS. FULTS, DRY GOODS AND NOTIONS,
FILLMORE STREET AND FERRY AVENUE

ONE of the oldest stores in this neighborhood is that of Mrs. Fults. This lady opened the store about a quarter of a century ago and has met with such success that an enlargement was found necessary about fourteen years ago.

The store is about 20x25 feet 'lu dimensions and fitted in the best manner. Here may be found a large and varied stock of Dry Goods, Notions, Hosiery, Underwear, White Goods, Furnishing Goods, Small and Fancy Wares, in fact everything that can possibly come in this line. Two capable assistants are kept busy.

Mrs. Fults is a native of Salem, N. J., but has been a resident of the city for over thirty-seven years, having always resided in this house since the time it was built.

A Dressmaking Department is under the supervision, of Mrs. Mary M. Livingstone.

When the family moved here there were only nine houses this side of KAIGHN'S avenue, and Mrs. Fults recollects cornfields and the corn stumps being dug out for the cellar. She is still an active lady and has many long years of life before her.

I.V. ROBINSON, CIGARS, 
403 KAIGHN'S AVENUE.

NO establishment in this section of the city has a larger and better selected stock of Cigars than this one. All the popular brands are kept. All Imported Key West and Domestic Cigars that have any merit about them are obtained and offered for sale.

The business was established by the present proprietor last August. The store proper is about 20 x 35 feet in dimensions.

All kinds of Smokers' Articles are kept. Mr. Robinson is also employed with Ferris Bros, in the Shoe Manufacturing business. He is an active member of the Red Men, Odd Fellows, Golden Eagle and many other organizations.

117

DR. E.B. GOODWIN, DRUGGIST, 
FIFTH AND CLINTON STREETS.

THE present proprietor purchased the interest of J. L. Lane, M.D., about a year ago.
The store occupied is 25x70 feet. A full stock of all the freshest Drugs, Patent Medicines, Perfumery, Soaps, Fancy Toilet Articles, etc., are always kept in stock. A specialty is made of carefully filling physicians' prescriptions. A large and handsome Soda Water Fountain is kept constantly busy in the Summer time.
Dr. Goodwin makes a big point in his Cigar stand. All the best brands of Imported and Key West Cigars are kept. Two capable assistants are employed.

Dr. Goodwin is a graduate of the University of Pennsylvania, and a registered Pharmacist in New Jersey. He is a native of Delaware.

D. T. STACKHOUSE, GROCER, 
FRONT & PENN STS.

AMONG the best known stores in this section may be mentioned that of Mr. D.T. Stackhouse. This gentleman established himself here about six years ago and has met with much success.
The store occupied is about 20x30 feet in dimensions and fitted in the best manner.

Here may be found a large and varied stock of Teas, Coffees, Spices, Flour, Canned Goods, and the many other things in this line. Fresh and Salt Meats are also handled extensively. Fresh Fruits, Provisions, Butter and Eggs are also carried. Three capable assistants are constantly employed.

Mr. Stackhouse is a native of the Keystone State, .but has been a highly respected resident of the city for some years past, having been in business at Front and Elm for twenty-five years prior to his buying his present place.

118

L. W. FROME & CO., FRUITS AND NUTS

THE business which now comes under consideration is that established about seven years ago at No. 308 Federal street, and has been conducted to its present handsome proportions by Messrs. L.W. Frome & Co., two of Camden's many enterprising men, who have earned the unusual success that has marked their progress, by dint of intelligent industry and a judicious; utilization of opportunities.

Their salesroom has a frontage of 16 feet by a depth of 60 feet, and for storage purposes they occupy a cellar at the corner of Third and Federal streets. Four assistants are employed, and two teams are constantly required in the handling of goods. The stock consists of Foreign and Domestic Fruits and Nuts—of the former a specialty is made of White Grapes.

Their trade is in the city and suburbs.

The individual members of the firm are L.W. Frome and Elmer E. Long. Mr. Frome is a native of Warren county, and was engaged in the same business at Lambertville before coming here. Mr. Long was born at Clayton, and prior to entering this business was a clerk in a dry goods house in Camden.

They have a most desirable wholesale and retail trade. Telephone call, 298.

A. V. JACKSON, DRY GOODS AND NOTIONS, 
333 FEDERAL STREET.

MISS A.V. JACKSON, who conducts a very nice and exceedingly popular Dry Goods and Notion store at No. 333 Federal street, is a native of New Jersey, and was never in business until 1885, when she established herself here. With a good stock, in complete assortment, a well arranged, neat and attractive store, and the proprietress with three obliging and affable assistants to serve the numerous patrons who have learned the advantages that result from such bestowal of their patronage, there is little room for misgivings as to its continued prosperity.

119

W. T. MAC DANNELL, MEATS AND PROVISIONS,
628 N. FRONT STREET

THERE are perhaps few better or more favorably known establishments in the northern section of the city than that of Mr. Mac Dannell. The business was established by himself about eight years ago at the present place which it now occupies.

The building is about 25x70 feet in dimensions and fitted up in the most commodious style possible. Full lines of Fresh and Salt Meats are constantly kept on hand, always on ice.
All kinds of Fruits, Vegetables and Provisions, Butter and Eggs are also for sale. A special department is made of the Canned Goods, in which line this establishment excel, keeping all kinds of the best and most liked varieties of Tomatoes, 'Corn, Peas, and everything that is canned.
The business when running requires the assistance of three men that are capable and efficient.

Mr. Mac Dannell is a native of the Keystone State, but has been a prominent and industrious citizen of Camden for the past ten years.

A. RABEAU, CIGARS,
2ND AND BRIDGE STS.

THIS is one of the stores in which lovers of that subtle weed delight to congregate, as they are always sure of a good article, Mr. Rabeau has been the proprietor of the store for the past ten years and has paid careful attention to the tastes of smokers, and carries in stock everything to please the most fastidious. 

The store occupied is about 25x35 feet in dimensions and fitted in the most commodious and handsome manner. All of the most popular brands of Key West and Domestic Cigars are always carried on hand. All of the many kinds of Smoking and Chewing Tobaccos are carried, as well as a full line of Smokers Articles, such as Cigar and Cigarette Holders, Pipes, Match Safes, etc. Two capable and genial assistants are employed.

Mr. Rabeau is a native of Bordentown, but has been a prominent and respected resident of the city for the past thirty-eight years. He is identified with the Red Men, Odd Fellows and Pennsylvania Railroad Relief Association of this city.

WILLIAM T. DOUGHTY, CIGARS,
1805 BROADWAY

POSSIBLY there is not a better known store in this 1 section than that of William T. Doughty. This gentleman opened business here about twenty-nine years ago. The store proper is about 20x20 feet in dimensions and fitted in the best manner. Here may be obtained a large and varied stock of Imported and Domestic Cigars, as well as a full line of Smoking and Chewing Tobaccos and Smokers Articles. 

Mr. Duoghty is a native of Lumberton, N. J., but he has been a prominent resident for some time. He is an active member of the Odd Fellows, Trinity Mechanics, American Mechanics and the Red Men.

The store is under the personal supervision of Mrs. Doughty, who looks after it in a satisfactory manner as an enterprising business woman.

120

MILLIETTE PRINTING ROOMS, 
117 N. FRONT STREET

AMONG the well-known houses in this line none have been more successful than Mr. Alexander J. Milliette. This business has been established since 1874, and in 1880 Mr. Milliette took the whole thing. 

Two floors are used, each 40x80 feet in dimension. They are fitted with the best machinery, 8 steam presses being used. Specialties are made of color work and fine job printing. A large jobbing business is done. Thirteen assistants are constantly employed.

Mr. Milliette is a native of Brooklyn, N. Y., but removed to Camden twenty years ago. He is an ex-Councilman. Prior to removing here Mr. Milliette was a resident of Philadelphia for about fifteen years.

121

122

VOLNEY G. BENNETT, LUMBER,
SECOND AND CHERRY STREETS

THE situation of Camden, with its great receiving and shipping facilities, makes it a most desirable point for the location of large lumber yards. Among the best known in the Southern section of the city may be mentioned that of Mr. Volney G. Bennett, a gentleman of vast experience in this line, having been in this line of trade all his business life.

This enterprise had its inception in 1876. The premises occupied are 222x360 feet in dimensions, extending from Front to Second streets and from Cherry to Spruce streets.
About one-half of the yard is covered with shedding for the storage of the finer grades.
An enormous stock is carried at all times of all kinds of Building Lumber, such as White and Yellow Pine, Hemlock, Spruce, etc.

Mr. Bennett enjoys the closest relations with the dealers and manufacturers in the West and South and is thus enabled to handle stuff at the lowest figures.

Mr. Bennett is also the proprietor of Hall's Sheathing Lath. This is a great improvement over the ordinary kind. It consists of pieces of lumber having a series of dovetailed parallel grooves running lengthwise. This is nailed on in the same manner as other laths, only it is ready to receive the plaster. It is especially adapted for ceilings under floors where great strength is required and for city buildings where cornices and center pieces are to be added.
The business gives employment to about ten men and four teams are required for local delivery.

Mr. Bennett is a native of Pike County, Pa., where he learned the entire art of cutting and manufacturing lumber. He came to this city in 1859, and has been engaged in this line since his arrival. He has always been prominent in all things tending toward the city's welfare. He is an active officer in several building associations.

123

FREDERICK YOUNG, CIGARS
96 FEDERAL STREET

THE art of handling Tobacco in such a manner as to make the best of it— to preserve the original flavor and manufacture Cigars so that they "smoke" evenly and freely, has been the aim of enterprising men engaged in the business for many years, and the results of these efforts are most satisfactory. The triumphs of American ingenuity and industry are to be seen in the goods that are to be found in the stores at five cents and ten cents.

Frederick Young, of 96 Federal street, makes a specialty of Master-work, Puffs, Opera, and other fine brands— favorites with the public— and all made in his own factory, by himself and three assistants. He also does a large trade in Smoking and Chewing Tobaccos of the best manufactures, and Smokers' Goods generally.

His salesroom is 18x22 feet in dimensions, and was opened by him two years ago. The trade is chiefly local and in the State.

Mr. Young was born in Pennsylvania, and was formerly employed as a journeyman in the same business.

J. M. BENTLEY, STATIONERY AND PRINTING, 
414 KAIGHN'S AVENUE

AMONG the prominent houses in this line may be mentioned that of Mr. J. M. Bentley. The printing business was established about five years ago and about six months ago the Stationery and Newspapers were added.

The store occupied is about 20 feet square with the printing rooms in the rear. All kinds of Stationery, Blank Books and Fancy Articles are kept, as well as all the Daily and Weekly Newspapers and Periodicals. All kinds of Job Printing is done, a large press being used.
Two capable assistants are constantly employed. 

Mr. Bentley is a native of Philadelphia and has been identified with the best interests of the city for some time.

124

J. FRANK DORMAN, VARIETIES, 
437 AND 439 KAIGHN'S AVENUE.

THIS line of business well conducted makes an, attractive establishment for the ordinary housewife to deal with. Here she can obtain anything that-she wants for very little money, the maximum cost, of any article in the whole stock being the munificent sum of one dime, while many articles can be obtained for just one-half.

The present owner bought out Mr. P. Williams, eight years ago, and in the year past has made many additions to the large stock. The store occupied is 40 feet front on KAIGHN'S avenue and 100 deep. All varieties of China, Glass and Wood Ware are to be found all sorts of Pots, Kettles and Pans, as well as various kinds of Novelties, which are both useful and ornamental.

Mr. Dorman also has the Government Agency for the sale of Stamps, Postal Cards and Stamped Envelopes.

Mr. Dorman is a member of the esteemed Order of Red Men, and various other organizations of the same: character.

ELLEN McCANN, CIGARS & CONFECTIONERY, 
1600 BROADWAY

AMONG the main houses opened in the past year, few have gained as enviable reputation as that of Mrs. McCann. This estimable lady opened business here about six months ago.
The store is about 20x30 feet in dimensions and fitted in the best manner. Here may be found a very choice selection of Fine Cigars, Smoking and Chewing Tobaccos, Cigarettes, Pipes, etc.
A large line of Confectionery is also carried. 
Mrs. McCann is a native of Scotland, but has been a well-known resident of our city for more than a score-of years.

125

D. B. GREEN, WALL PAPERS, 
FIFTH AND BENSON STREETS

ONE of the oldest and most favorably known houses in this line is the establishment of Mr. D. B. Green, at the N. E. corner of Fifth and Benson streets. The business was launched upon its successful career about twelve years ago. The building is a corner one and has a frontage of 30 feet on Benson street and a depth on Fifth street of more than 35 feet.
Anything that can be done with wall paper this concern is able to do, from the finest to the cheapest.

Many of the finest houses in the city are examples of the beautiful and tasteful work turned out.

As well as the Wall Papers a full stock of designs in Window Shades are kept. Special sizes are made to order. An Oil Cloth Department is one of the successful branches of the business, in which all kinds are kept from the thin table oil cloth to the heavier grades of No. 1 Elon cloths. When running at fair capacity about nine skilled decorators are employed and one team.

Mr. Green has been a life-long resident of the cit}r and is quite active in the M. E. Church, being a local deacon.

W. S. THOMPSON, LIVERY AND SALE STABLE, 
209 KAIGHN'S AVENUE

THIS stable was opened last year. The building is fitted with all the best sanitary appliances, special attention being paid to light, heat and ventilation.

A fine Drug Store is also under the supervision of Mr. Thompson, who is a practical pharmacist, having passed the State Board of Examiners. This store has been running for the past nine years and all kinds of the freshest Drugs, Perfumery, Soaps and Fancy Toilet Articles are kept.

Mr. Thompson is a native of the city and has always been a. prominent citizen.

126

CHAS. H. ULBRICH, LOCKSMITH AND BELL HANGER, 
322 ARCH STREET

AMONG the best and most favorably known establishments of this character in this vicinity may be mentioned is that of Mr. Chas. H. Ulbrich. This gentleman established business about eight years ago.

The premises are about 20x40 feet in dimensions. The store and workroom are well filled with all the best appliances. All kinds of Locks are put in. Bell Hanging is attended to. Speaking Tubes and Electric Bells put up. Repairing is attended to in all branches of the trade. Mr. Ulbrich is the agent in this city for the sale of the Cincinnatti Safe Company's Safes.

Mr. Ulbrich is a member of the Vest Verein, Odd Fellows, Red Men, Knights of the Golden Eagle, Shield of Honor and American Mechanics.

 

CHAS. E. SLOUGH, DRUGGIST, 
S. W. COR. SECOND AND MARKET STREETS.

THIS gentleman purchased the business about six years ago from D. J. Patton. The store is about 20x35 feet in dimensions and fitted -up in the best manner.

A large and heavy stock of fresh Drugs, Perfumery, Soaps, Sachets and Fancy Articles. A large stock of Imported and Domestic Cigars is also kept. A handsome Soda Water Fountain is also kept running. 

Among the specialties put up are Ringel's Pectoral Syrup and Brenner's Vermifuge, which have been in popular use as medicines for the last quarter of a century, and proven successful in all cases. Three skilled assistants are constantly employed.

Mr. Slough is a native of Pennsylvania. He is a graduate of the Philadelphia College of Pharmacy.

127

FRED. W. GEORGE, GENTS' FURNISHER, 
1020 BROADWAY

AMONG the many stores that have opened lately, none give promise of more success than that of that genial and courteous gentleman, Mr.F. W. George, This gentleman was formerly employed with one of the largest and best houses in the city, and thinking that a store of this character was needed, opened his new establishment within the past two months.

The store itself, is about 20 x 30 feet in dimensions, and is fitted all newly and freshly with the best that is possible. A full line of all the newest shapes in Hats are shown, as well as full lines of Gents' Furnishing Goods. All kinds of Hosiery, Underwear, Neckwear, Collars and Cuffs, etc., are carried in stock at all times. Two capable and well known assistants are employed.

Mr. George is a native of the city, and his admiring fellow-citizens have chosen him as a member of the School Board. He is also connected with the Odd Fellows and Red Men.

W. H. CHAMBERLAIN, FURNITURE, 
428 KAIGHN'S AVENUE.

ONE of the most prominent houses in this line in this section is that of Mr. W. H. Chamberlain. This gentleman opened here about two years ago, and has met with the most promising success.
The store occupied is about 25 x 70 feet in area.
Here may be found a large and varied stock of Furniture—all kinds of Bedroom and Parlor Suites being made a specialty of. A Carpet Department is also a feature.
All kinds of special orders are taken.
Mr. Chamberlain is a native of this city, and has always been identified with its best interests.
A special feature is made of Window Shade Goods, which are kept on hand in infinite variety, and put up by Mr. Chamberlain personally, at lower prices than can be successfully competed with.

128

HERMAN T. FUCHS, MILLINERY GOODS,
516 & 518 FEDERAL STREET

THIS house was established by Mr. Fuchs in 1876. His main salesroom is 34 x 60 feet in size, with a workroom in the rear 9x16 feet. Eight hands are permanently employed here, mostly engaged in the leading and delicate specialty of trimming, in which this establishment is unsurpassed.

Another important branch, namely, cleaning, dyeing, etc., receives particular attention here.
Mr. Fuchs' large double store is conceded to be a leading house in this line in the city.
By the way, in mentioning the several departments, it would never do to forget that, in addition to the rooms already descriptively named, a capacious stockroom occupies the second floor. The stock comprises a complete assortment of Flowers, Feathers, Ribbons, Laces, Crepes, Embroideries, White Goods, Gloves, Ruchings, L,ace Caps, etc.; also a full line of Woolen Knit Goods for ladies' and children's wear.

The proprietor has a branch house at Hagerstown, Md., where four additional hands are employed, and in which the same regular departments are carried on, and the same specialties find a profitable patronage.

Mr. Fuchs is by birth a German, and came to this country in 1851. He was formerly a fresco painter, but has found a mercantile occupation more to his taste, and in this line his artistic predilections find much gratification.

CHARLES W. SCOTT, GROCER,
CRAMER'S HILL, 

THERE is scarcely a more prominent business in this section of the city than that of Mr. Charles W. Scott. This gentleman is one of the pioneers of this section, having opened here fifteen years ago.

The store is about 20x30 feet in dimensions and fitted nicely.
A large and varied stock is carried, comprising Groceries, Salt Meats, Provisions, Fruits, Canned Goods, Dry Goods, Notions and Small Wares. One assistant is employed.

Mr. Scott is a native of Connecticut but has been a resident here for many years; he has held various political positions, Township Committee for four years, and a member of School Board for ten years.

129

MRS. KELLUM, DRY GOODS, 
2nd AND FEDERAL STREETS

THERE is scarcely a better known store in this section of the city than that of Mrs. Kellum. This estimable lady opened business here about seven years ago and has since managed it most successfully.

The store is about 20x20 feet in dimensions and fitted in the best manner. A large and heavy stock of Dry Goods, Notions, Hosiery, Underwear, Small Wares and Fancy Goods, is constantly carried.

Mrs. Kellum has always been a resident of the State.

ELMER E. WRIGHT, GROCER,
609 FERRY AVENUE

ONE of the oldest and best known houses in this section is that of Mr. E. E. Wright. This gentleman's father opened this store about 17 years ago and managed it until the past year, when his son, the present proprietor, took hold of it.

The store is about 20x30 feet in dimensions and is fitted in the nicest possible manner. A large and varied stock of Sugars, Teas, Coffees, Soaps, Spices, and a general line of Groceries, is carried. Salt and Fresh Meats are also sold extensively. Fresh Fruit and Provisions are always to be found here in great variety. Three capable assistants are constantly employed and one team is kept busy.

Mr. Wright is a native of Philadelphia but has been an esteemed resident of the city for many years.

180

P. J. FARLEY, FINE TOBACCO AND CIGARS.
HADDON AVENUE & FEDERAL STREET

IT was once thought that the German was the principal patron of the "briar" and "meerschaum;" the Irish peasant of the "dudeen," and the South American and Spaniard of the cigarette. But times have changed, and our own countrymen out-Herod Herod, and lead the world as general consumers of the narcotic weed. In its preparation, too, we are second to no other nationality.

P. J. Farley, who is conveniently located at the corner of Haddon avenue and Federal street, has been, since 1885, successfully engaged in the manufacture and sale of Cigars, wholesale and retail, and dealer in all descriptions of Smokers' Goods, Chewing Tobacco of every approved and popular brand, and the line of Sundries that are considered legitimate adjuncts of the Tobacco trade. He makes a specialty of the Haddonfield Pike, a cigar retailed at three cents. Of this brand he has sold 180,000 in three months. He employs two assistants.

Mr. Farley is a native of this city, and prior to commencing his present business was a compounder of liquors in Philadelphia. He has occupied his present stand since 1888. He carries a heavy stock, and keeps a wagon constantly on the road supplying patrons in all portions of Camden and Gloucester counties.

M. C. CONNELLY, TRIMMINGS, ETC., 
440 KAIGHN'S AVENUE.

THE store is about 20 x 70 feet in dimensions, and fitted up in the best manner. Here may be found a large and varied stock of all kinds of Dry Goods, Notions, Hosiery, Underwear, Ribbons, and Small Wares, as well as a large and varied selection of Carpets.

Mr. Connelly is a native of Northumberland county, Pa., but has been one of Camden's most prosperous and industrious citizens for some time.

131

WILLIAM S. SCULL & CO., COFFEES, TEAS AND SPICES,
FRONT & FEDERAL STREETS

ONE of the most important and substantial commercial houses in Camden, and the only one in its line, is that of William S. Scull & Co., importers, roasters and packers of Coffee, Tea Dealers and grinders of Spices, located at the corner of Front and Federal streets, with all its capacious offices, mills and storehouses. This large establishment was founded in 1857 by William S. Scull, and has been conducted by the present firm for the past fifteen years. The business is altogether wholesale. The premises occupied have a frontage of 75 feet by a depth of 126 feet. Twenty-five hands are employed in the various departments, and three teams are found necessary in the transaction of the business. The trade lies in the States of New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland and Pennsylvania.

The individual members of the firm are William S. and William C. Scull, who both hold high places in the esteem and confidence of their fellow-citizens. The senior of the firm has been a member of the City Council and is a director of the W. J. and Atlantic R. R., of the Camden Safe Deposit and Trust Co , of the Camden Horse R. R., of the Seventh Nat. Bank of Philadelphia, of the South Jersey Finance Co., of the W. J. Title and Trust Co., of the Camden Fire Association, and of the Camden Electric Light Co.

LOEB & SCHOENFELD, MANUFACTURERS OF EMBROIDERIES,
FRONT AND PEARL STREETS

THERE are few concerns in this country that are able to turn out the beautiful work done by this one. The parent house is located in Switzerland, and is one of the largest of the kind in the world.

There are made all kinds of Embroideries, L,aces, etc. The works occupy about 40 acres of ground with a large I, shaped factory that contains 145 embroidering machines.
Six hundred people are required in the building besides the numerous other employes who work in their
own homes, numbering in all about 2,000. The factory in this city was started about seven years ago.

The building is 100x160, three floors being used. Twenty special machines are used, on the designs of which this firm hold the patents. The work done is the Embroidering of Ladies' and Misses' Dresses, the finest kind of work being done with the same facility as the coarser grades. Sixty skilled people are employed when running normally.

The trade of this concern lies all over the world. The salesrooms are located at 86 and 88 Franklin street, New York. 

The individual members of the firm are Messrs. Ferd L. Loeb, Louis Loeb and Max Schoenfeld and David Schoenfeld. These gentlemen occupy the first rank as manufacturers and business men both in American and foreign circles. The Camden representative is F. A. Loeb, who has been the able and efficient director of the works here for the last three years, prior to which time he was in Switzerland, from which place he brought the bright ideas which are manifested in his executive capacity here.

132

E. J. COOK, HARNESS MAKER, 
201 KAIGHN'S AVENUE

THIS gentleman succeeded Mr. L. F. Kimble about two years ago. The shop is about 30x20 feet in dimension and all the best tools are used. Here may be found a very large and varied line of Light and Heavy Harness, both single and double, plain and mounted, all kinds of Saddles, Collars, Blankets, Robes, Grease, Oils, Soap, and in fact everything that comes under the head of harness. A special feature is made of repairing, which is done in the best manner. 

Mr. Cook has had a life's experience in this line and is a thoroughly practical man.

133

JOHN F. LEAVITT, M. D., DRUGGIST,
3d & ELM STREETS

A POPULAR store of its kind among Camden citizens is that under review, originally established four years ago by the present proprietor.

A neatly fitted up salesroom 15x30 feet in dimensions is well equipped with a fine line of pure, fresh Drugs, Proprietory Medicines, Perfumery, Toilet Articles, Sponges, together with a fine assortment of Confectionery, Cigars, etc. The place is ornamented by a magnificent Soda Fountain and has a well fitted up Laboratory in the rear, where, under the personal supervision of the proprietor, medicines are dispensed.

Dr. Leavitt is a native of the State of New Jersey, and has resided here since his establishment in business. Dr. Leavitt is a graduate of the medical department of the University of New York, and has had a large practice in his native county, succeeding his father. He is an absolute master of his profession and is extremely popular in the community, both in business and social circles, being an esteemed member of the Order of Red Men, Mercantile Lodge Shield of Honor and Golden Eagle, as well as I. O. O. F., and a member of the city and county medical societies.

HENRY SCHULZ, WAGON BUILDER,
946, 948 AND 950 FEDERAL STREET

AMONG the many large establishments in this line may be mentioned that of Mr. Henry Schulz. This gentleman established business here some four years ago and has met with success in this venture. The shop is about 60x20 feet in dimensions. All kinds of wagons and carriages are built to order. Heavy work is a specialty, as well as all kinds of repairing in the neatest and best manner and at the shortest possible notice.

Eight skillful workmen are constantly employed. One team is kept to facilitate the progress of the business.

The establishment is known as the Camden Wagon Works and noted for reliability of workmanship.

Mr. Schulz is a native of Germany and has been a resident of the city since coming to this country in 1880. Mr. Schulz is connected with the Masonic Order and has passed through all the chairs excepting one.

134

MILLS & BRO., MEATS AND PROVISIONS, 
1542 BROADWAY.

AMONG the best known houses in this section may be mentioned that of Messrs. Mills & Bro. These gentlemen succeeded their father about four years ago. 

The store occupied is about 20x50 feet in dimensions and fitted nicely. Here may be obtained a choice selection of Fresh and Salt Meats, Fresh Fruits and Provisions. Three capable assistants are constantly employed, and one team is used to deliver orders. A wholesale business is done all over this and adjoining counties.

ISAAC M. COLE & SONS, HEATERS AND RANGES, 
FRONT AND MAIN STREETS

TEN years ago Mr. Cole started this business and he has placed the Heaters and Ranges in many of the new houses that have been erected in this neighborhood. His specialties are Heaters and Ranges of all kinds. He also manufactures all varieties of Tinware, and goods on special order. He gives employment when running normally to 10 assistants that are well acquainted in this line. 

His son, Mr. Charles Cole, is a practical and thorough business man. Both gentlemen are prominent members of the community and are members of the Knights of Pythias, Damon Lodge No. 1, Legion of the Red Cross. 

Galvanized Iron Work, Ornamental Cornices and Corrugated Iron Work is turned out. Two places are used.

135

HENRY GARREN, OYSTERS, 
27 AND 29 S. 4th STREET

THIS establishment is one of the oldest and best known in the neighborhood, it having been here for nearly a quarter of a century. The business was established by the present proprietor in 1866, and has been one of the most successful in the line.

The building has a frontage on Fourth street of 24 feet and a depth of 70 feet. Here Oysters may be had cooked in any style and iu the best manner. A specialty is made of serving families, in which direction a large trade has been established. A full line of Cigars is also kept, the proprietor running factory No. 34, ist district, this State. Three assistants are constantly employed.

Mr. Garren is a native of Philadelphia but has been identified with Camden's best interest for so long that he may almost be called a native. He is a member of Post 37, and the Union Veteran Legion Encampment No. 2, of Philadelphia.

He went out in the frigate St. Lawrence in 1861 and ended in the U. S. ship Kansas at Fort Fisher in 1865, serving as Quartermaster.

R. T. ROBINSON, GROCER, 
N. E. COR. 3rd AND LINDEN STREETS

THIS section of Camden is blessed in having such an establishment as that of Mr. R. T. Robinson. He makes it a special feature to cater to a select trade, with the finest that the market provides, in all kinds of Fresh and Salt Meats and Provisions, Fruits, Vegetables, Canned and Bottled Goods.

His palatial store has a frontage of 25 feet and a depth of 50 feet. The proprietor employs in the successful prosecution of his business seven able associates and three teams that are kept busy delivering his orders. 

He is a native of the State of New Jersey and has been identified with the commercial prosperity of the City of Camden for the past seven years, winning the respect of all who know him.

D. D. HELM, HOME KILLED MEATS, 
FEDERAL STREET MARKET

THERE is among the people of this State, where so much of the finest stock is raised, a general preference for meats and provisions that have been home-produced and home-prepared. Hence a preference is manifested for meats that are killed and dressed at home. A gentleman who profits much by this inclination to patronize home productions is David D. Helm, a wholesale and retail Butcher and dealer in Meats, etc., who occupies four of the finest and cleanest stalls in Federal Street Market, and sells choice cuts of Beef, Veal, Mutton and such soever of other Meats as the tastes of his patrons demand. He has been engaged in the butchering business continuously for the past twenty-three years, and at his present stand since 1878. Mr. Helm, being an active, practical man, with a full knowledge of all the details of his business, has built up his own trade by sheer force of his own energy, and his rule, to give a fair equivalent for all money invested with him has contributed largely to his great success.

He employs three assistants and runs two delivery wagons, which enables him to serve an immense retail patronage within the city and over routes extending many miles into the country districts around.

He handles only Meats slaughtered by his own force. Of the leading kinds he kills from 12 to 15 beeves, 75 to 100 sheep, and from 25 to 35 calves and lambs each week. He supplies many retailers in Camden and elsewhere—sometimes shipping important orders to places more distant, even as far away as Jersey City.

Mr. Helm was born in Philadelphia, but has spent nearly all his days in Camden, with the exception of a term of service in the army, having enlisted in 1861 as a Union soldier in the late rebellion, and there made himself an honorable record. He learned the trade of a butcher in early life from his father, whose father was also a butcher back to three generations, a trade he has always followed save in the single instance referred to.

137

SAMUEL A. OWEN, BOOT AND SHOE MAKER, 
328 ARCH STREET

THIS gentleman established business in this city nearly forty years ago and has been actively engaged in this since the inception. All kinds of Ladies' foot gear and Gaiters are turned out. Particular attention being paid to repairing.

Mr. Owen is a native of this State. He has been a resident of Camden for nearly two score of years. 

He was a police officer under ex-Mayor Charles Cox. He has been connected with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows for more than forty years and was born in Salem.

L. R. STEWART, GROCER, 
4th AND ARCH STREETS

AMONG the many successful stores in this line may be mentioned the one of Mr. L. R. Stewart, who opened a very handsome establishment about two years agq. The store occupied is about 30x100 feet in dimensions and it is fitted in the most commodious manner.

Here may be found one of the most complete Grocery stocks. All grades of Teas, Coffees, Sugars, etc., are found here in great variety. Butter and Eggs are also handled, as well as all kinds of Fresh Fruits and Provisions. Four capable and well known assistants and one team are constantly kept busy.

Mr. Stewart is a native of Philadelphia but has been in Camden since 1875. He is a prominent member of the Order of Red Men.

J. WESTCOTT, PRACTICAL SHOEMAKER, 
304 ARCH STREET.

PERHAPS there is not a better or more favorably known establishment of this character in tins neighborhood than that of Mr. J. Westcott.

This gentleman originally established business in Bridgeton about thirty years ago, where he remained until three years ago, when he came here. He is a thoroughly practical man and is fully acquainted with all the many details connected with this business. All kinds of Men's, Ladies', Misses' and Childrens' Boots and Shoes are turned out. The greatest care is used in repairing. The work in hand gives constant employment to several skilled workmen.

Mr. Westcott has been a lifelong resident of New Jersey and is very well known both here and in Bridgeton.

138

MRS. E. B. JOHNSON, RESTAURANT, 
1612 BROADWAY.

AMONG the most favorably known restaurants in A this section is that of Mrs. Johnson. This lady opened this establishment about a year ago. 

The dining room is about 18x16 feet square and fitted in the best manner. It is capable of seating about fifteen people at once. Everything is home cooked and sure to be good as the proprietress keeps a sharp lookout for this branch of the business. A number of meals are sent out to the people who are employed in the neighborhood.

Mrs. Johnson has become a well known resident of the neighborhood, this being the only restaurant in that vicinity.

ABNER SPARKS, CIGARS, 
3d AND ARCH STS.

AMONG the pioneer Cigar Manufacturers of this city may be mentioned Mr. Abner Sparks. This estimable gentleman started in business way back in the forties and is still taking an active part in the management. 

The store is about 35x40 feet in dimensions with the factory and store rooms in the rear.
A very heavy stock is carried, comprising all the best brands of Imported and Domestic Cigars, Tobaccos and Smokers Articles. All kinds of Cigars are sold at wholesale as well as retail.

Mr. Sparks has been prominent in public as well as private life, having been chosen by his admiring fellow citizens as City Treasurer, member of the Board of Freeholders and the first Inspector of Cigars ever appointed by the Internal Revenue Department in New Jersey. 

139

LEO. REINFRIED, GUN, LOCKSMITH AND BELL HANGER, 
246 KAIGHN'S AVENUE.

A USEFUL, avocation is that of the gun and locksmith, and the gentleman whose name heads this article is worthy of mention in the columns of this review.

Established here in 1885. He occupies a salesroom 20 x 36 feet in size, fitted out with all the necessary shelving etc., for the transaction of this business. His shop is in the front portion of the store where the brightest light assists him in the execution of new and repair work. All the appliances known to the trade are here enjoyed, and no means spared to foster the interest of those who favor him with any work in his line. The stock consists of firearms, revolvers, guns, ammunition, powder, shot, blank and filled cartridges, glass balls, pad and door locks, keys, springs, bells, gongs, in fact everything properly belonging to this branch of trade.

Born in Germany, Mr. Reinfried came to this country in 1829. Being a mechanic all his life, and when the dark cloud that threatened our fair name and country hung over us, Mr. Reinfried did some active service in the Arsenal at Bridesburg, in the capacity of a gunsmith, making firearms for the United States troops.

He has won the esteem of all who know him, for his upright demeanor and personal worth, and any one having anything to do in his line can find no better exponent of his trade anywhere, and will be benefited by giving him a call.

140

E. L. TRUAX. GROCERIES AND PROVISIONS,
COR. FOURTH & KAIGHN'S AVENUE.

ONE of the representative establishments in the line of groceries and provisions, in this section of Camden, is that of the gentleman whose name heads this article. Many years ago this corner had been regarded as a grocery stand; the present proprietor succeeding to its management, Mr Bowen in 1884.

The salesroom occupied is 22 x 42- feet in dimensions, a fine, large and light apartment, having all the necessary fixtures for the prosecution of a first-class trade. The stock is extensive and embraces groceries and provisions, teas, coffees and spices, free from dust and deleterious substances, a fine line of canned and bottled goods, toilet and kitchen requisites, fresh and cured, smoked and dried meats, fine family flour, butter, cheese, eggs and country produce generally, as well as poultry and fish in season, besides, a fine line of cigars and garden seeds. To facilitate the work of the establishment a competent assistant is employed, and every means taken to foster the interests of a select and growing patronage.

A native of Monmouth, N. J., Mr. Truax enlisted in 1862 in Co. H, 14th N. J. Volunteers, and for the protection of his county's flag and honor, served with distinction in the battles of " The Wilderness," "Cold Harbor," " Spotsylvania," " Hanover, " " North Ann," and others of minor import, receiving honorable discharge in 1865.

Since establishing in his present mercantile pursuit holds the esteem of the community and is regarded in the commercial world as a responsible dealer.

E. K. FORTINER, HARDWARE, SASH, BLINDS, ETC.
122 FEDERAL STREET

E.K. FORTINER, the subject of this brief mention, was the first manufacturer of Sash and Blinds in Camden, and carried on that business here as long ago as 1845. The building now occupied by him, at 122 Federal street, was erected in 1856, and has a frontage of 20 feet by a depth of 60 feet.

He was succeeded by Daniel J. Shriner, who was in turn succeeded by Doughton & Coles, and the business which Mr. Fortiner founded is now conducted by C. B. Coles & Co.
Tools, Nails, Locks, Paints, Oils, Glass, Sash, Blinds, Doors, Shutters, Mouldings, Stair Rails, Chimney Tops, Flue Pipes; Harrison's Ready-mixed Paints; Cucumber Pumps, with vulcanized Rubber Buckets ; Garden Hose, and Builders' Supplies generally. 

The first and second floors are occupied as salesrooms, and the third and fourth floors as warerooms; and three assistants are employed, with a delivery wagon.

Mr. Fortiner was born at Haddonfield, in this county, August 12, 1820. He is an enterprising citizen—has served the city in Council, and has held, at times, the office of Street Commissioner, besides other public positions.

141

SEYBOLD, BREAD AND CAKE BAKERY, 
230 FEDERAL STREET

THE excellent bread and cake bakery at No. 230 Federal Street, was established in 1858 some ways above here, and in 1863 was removed to its present location. It has always enjoyed a high degree of popular favor, derived wholly from the fine quality of its products. The business done here is of sufficient magnitude to require the services of four hands besides the proprietor, and includes bread of fine quality, together with a great variety of fancy cakes. A specialty is made of supplies for balls, weddings, picnics, etc. The capacity of the establishment is twelve barrels a week, and one delivery wagon is employed in filling the numerous orders that come from all parts of the city.

Mr. Solomon Seybold, the genial proprietor, was born in Germany, but has been in America since 1854. He has always been a baker. He was formerly in business in the West, and at one period worked for Mr. Harrison, now President Harrison, in Indiana.

142

G.H. WILSON, FINE CIGARS AND TOBACCO, 
310 FEDERAL STREET

THE actual amount of tobacco in a form consumed in the United States is not, and probably never will be known, notwithstanding all efforts to procure correct statistics. However, at this time it is only to mention briefly a single establishment engaged in the trade, viz: The popular resort for consumers, at 310 Frederal Street, kept by G. H. Wilson, and started by him about four years ago at this stand. The dimensions of his salesroom are 14x14 feet; in the rear of this is a smoking and reading room, where sports do congregate— this room being 14x20 feet in size. He handles all the approved brands, including Cuba Clime, Mikado, and Wilson's Special, a fine cigar manufactured for his own retail trade. A large retail patronage has resulted from the efforts of the proprietor to do an honest business by giving a fair equivalent for the money expended with him, and its present proportions require the services of himself and assistant.

Mr. Wilson was born in Philadelphia, is a painter by trade, and is engaged in that occupation during the day, but gives his personal attention to his store in the evening. Mr. Wilson is a member of the Painters' Union, also the Shield of Honor.

D.A. GENTHER, CONFECTIONERY, 
FEDERAL STREET, BETWEEN 21st AND 22d STREETS

AMONG the oldest and best known houses in this section may be mentioned that of Mr. Daniel A. Genther. This gentleman is one of the pioneers in this section, having opened business here about 15 years ago. The store occupied is about 20x20 feet, with the bakery in the basement.

All kinds of Confectionery, Pies, Plain and Fancy Cakes, Bread, etc., are constantly on hand, besides a fine line of Cigars, Smoking and Chewing Tobacco.

Mr. Genther is a native of Philadelphia, but has been an esteemed resident for the past 18 years.

143

COUNTRY PRODUCE.

AMONG the many attractive stalls in the Federal Street Market none presents a more inviting appearance than do the 4 stalls occupied by Isaac K. Horner, wholesale and retail dealer in all kinds of Country Produce, including Fruits and Vegetables according to their several seasons. Three assistants and two teams are required to supply the large and increasing trade, established here by Mr. Horner in 1878. The patronage of this concern is drawn chiefly from the different portions of the city, where he has an important trade among local retailers.

Isaac K. Horner was born at Gibbsboro, N. J., and in his earlier life was engaged in agricultural pursuits. In 1862 he enlisted in F Company, i2th Infantry, N. J. Volunteers. After participating in the battles of Chancellorsville, Gettysburg, and all the battles in which the Army of the Potomac was engaged, 17 in all, was mustered out with his regiment.

MEAT MARKET

IN no occupation is neatness more desirable and essential than in those which are devoted to the preparation and general handling and care of articles of food. The utmost care is exercised in all departments of the business conducted by Walter S. Worrell, meat dealer, at No. 736 Federal Street, who handles only city-dressed meats, of which he carries exactly sufficient to supply the demands of a most desirable patronage that has been built up by fair dealing. He established himself here 6 years ago, in a salesroom 16x30 feet in size, and has had no reason to complain of any lack of patronage or friendly appreciation by his neighbors, with whom he is very popular.

Mr. Worrell was born in Pemberton, Burlington County, and has been identified with his present business for the past ten years.

144

MOORE BROS., GROCERS,
3rd AND STEVENS STREETS

THE business was originally established by Jas. M. Roberts, and about five years ago the present firm purchased his interest and succeeded him. The store proper is about 25x50 feet in dimensions and fitted in the best possible manner. A full stock is carried of all kinds of Groceries. All the many grades of Flour, Sugar, Teas, Coffees, Spices, etc., are to be found here. Canned Goods are made a specialty of, and are always sure to be fresh, as the trade in this line is large. A full stock of both Fresh and Salt meats is also carried, in which department this house excel. Three capable assistants are given constant employment and one team is kept to deliver the many orders.

R. T. & F. B. Moore are the individual members of the firm, both highly respected and well-known business men. In its season a specialty is made of Jersey Poultry and Eggs.

TOONE & HOLLINSHED, DRY GOODS & NOTIONS
BROADWAY & KAIGHN'S AVENUE

THERE is not an establishment in the city that is better known than the store of Toone & Hollinshed. This business was originally started by a lady by the name of Treble, many years ago, the present firm buying it out and being in business about seven years. The individual members of the firm are the well-known gentlemen Isaac C. Toone and Thomas Hollinshed.

The store occupied is on the corner of Broadway and KAIGHN'S avenue, and has a frontage of about 100 feet on each street. Here may be found one of the largest and most varied stocks in the States. All grades of Dress and Dry Goods, all kinds of Silks, Cashmeres, Mohairs and the many grades of Plaids, Muslins, etc. All sizes and kinds of Hosiery and Underwear are always kept in stock. A special department is made of the Carpets, in which may be found all grades of Moquette, Brussels, Tapestries, Ingrains, Rugs, Matting, etc. 

Boots and Shoes are also in a special department. Hats and Caps occupy a large space, and the stock in this line is particularly fine. Clothing occupies the second floor, in which department may be found one of the largest lines of Custom and Ready Made Goods.
Full lines of Neckwear, Notions, Fancy Goods and Small Wares are constantly kept.

Twenty-five salespeople, who are ever on the lookout for the firm's interests, are given constant employment.

Both gentlemen are well known and respected residents of the city.

145

CHARLES GUYN, CIGARS, 
23rd AND FEDERAL STREETS

AMONG the best known stores in this neighborhood may be mentioned that of Mr. Charles E. Guyn. This estimable gentleman opened business here about a year ago and has since conducted it in the most successful manner. The store is about 20 feet square, and fitted in the nicest manner. A full stock of Confectionery is carried. Cigars, Smoking and Chewing Tobacco is also handled.

Mr. Guyn is a native of Georgia but has spent most of his time in Philadelphia. He holds a valuable position with the Knickerbocker Ice Company, with whom he had been for over n years in Philadelphia; in addition to his business, is a member of the Red Men Tribe and Red Men League Shield of Honor.

146

F. H. POWELL., CIGARS, WHOLESALE AND RETAIL.
114 FEDERAL STREET

THE well-known Cigar store and factory of F. H. Powell, dealer in and manufacturer of fine Cigars, is situated at No. 114 Federal street. It was established by the present proprietor eight years ago, and is carried on by Mr. Powell and five assistants, all of whom are practical cigarmakers.

The salesroom is 14x22 feet in size, with a workshop on the second floor. They manufacture all the cigars they handle, and their quality has given them a fine reputation. Among the specialties made and sold here are Cuba Clime, Champion, Champion Aetna' and other fancy brands.

Mr. Powell is a native of Cape May county, and an adept at the trade of a cigarmaker.

W. D. REEL, HATS AND FURNISHING GOODS, 
330 FEDERAL STREET

W.D. REEL, Hatter and Gentlemen's Furnisher, . who is handsomely located at 330 Federal street, has made for himself and his house a most enviable reputation, since he commenced business here in 1882.

His main salesroom has a frontage of 20 feet by a depth of 28 feet. The Underwear Department in the rear of this is 16x18 feet in dimensions. In both of these rooms there is a fine display of Hats in all fashionable styles and of every grade and quality, as well as Gentlemen's, Youths' and Boys' Underwear, Shirts, Collars, Cuffs and the necessary cuff and collar Buttons, Studs, Pins, Brooches, etc.; and a line of Silk and Linen Handkerchiefs, Ties, Suspenders, Umbrellas, and many desirable novelties. Several assistants are employed.

Mr. Reel was born in Philadelphia, but has been a resident of Camden for the past twelve years. He was with the United Hat Company at one time five years, and spent three years and four months in Europe in the United States Navy. He was five years in the employ of the celebrated firm of Blaylock & Blynn, Hatters, Chestnut street, Philadelphia. Mr. Reel is a member of fourteen different secret societies, and is a Director of the Press Club.

147


148

TAYLOR BROS., FLOUR, FEED, SEEDS AND AGRICULTURAL MACHINERY, 
FRONT AND MARKET. NOS. 38 & 40 MARKET STREET


AS you arrive in the city from Philadelphia there is not a more prominent building on the river front than this one. The trade done by this concern is without doubt the largest done by any of this character in the State, extending from Trenton to Cape May.

This enterprise had its inception in 1865, in the personage of Mr. John B. Taylor, and after passing through various changes came under the entire management of the present firm about eleven years ago.

The premises are extremely large and are composed of two buildings, the offices and salesroom, about 6ox 100 feet in dimensions and five floors in height, and the shipping department, about 30x100 feet in dimensions and three floors in height. In every way the buildings are fitted in the most commodious manner. Every facility for the receipt and shipment of product at low figures is used. In conjunction with the main store in this city a branch store is carried on at Vineland.

A very heavy stock is carried, comprising a full and complete line of Grain, Hay, Straw, Wheat, etc. Seeds of all kinds are kept. Agricultural Machinery is one of the principal branches of the business, the firm being agents here for many of the most noted makes.
This city being the distributing point of such a great agricultural belt as the State forms makes an enormous supply house of this character necessary, where every-thing that a farmer could possibly require can be found. In all lines special care is exercised to keep them full. All new styles are constantly gotten to keep the stock full. A great run is made on Family Flour, particular care being used to keep it up to the high standard.

The members of the firm are Messrs. George E. Taylor and G. Wilbur Taylor. These gentlemen are sons of the original proprietor and have been associated with the business since its inception. Mr. G. E. Taylor is a director of the New Jersey Trust Company.
For many years they have been prominently identified with all moves made toward the city's benefit and are very well known.

In addition to their main building this firm also controls Nos. 8 and 12 Market street and a large elevator at Cooper's Point.

149 & 150

Pages 102 to 150

Pages 151 to 190


WILLIAM BLEAKLY, WOOD-BURNT LIME, HAIR, PLASTER, ETC., 
N. W. COR. FRONT & FEDERAL STREETS

A REPRESENTATIVE business man and public-spirited citizen is the subject of this too brief sketch; succeeding George Garrett, who established the above place about twenty years ago.

Two places are occupied, one being on the N. W. corner of Front and Federal streets, and the other at Twelfth and Federal streets. They are 40x60 feet and 150x100 feet, respectively, in dimensions and are devoted to the sale of the celebrated Cedar Valley Wood-Burnt Lime and a line of kindred stock, such as Hair, Calcined and Land Plaster, Sand, Sewer Pipe, Fire Clay and Brick Cement, Coal, etc.

MRS. WILLIAM DOERSCHNER, DYEING AND SCOURING, 
415 FEDERAL STREET.

THE restoration of faded, stained or soiled goods to their pristine freshness and brightness is an occupation that commends itself to every one for its usefulness. Mrs. William Doerschner, of 415 Federal street, has been for twenty-three years past engaged in this business— in fact, since they came here from Germany. They were formerly located in Atlantic City, but removed to Camden on the 25th of February, 1890. Visitors are received and orders taken in the office of the concern, which is 14x14 feet in size and in which numerous specimens of the work done here may always be seen and inspected. Silks, woolens, crapes and merinos are dyed in any desired colors; crape and merino shawls dyed scarlet and other colors; merino, cashmere and crape shawls cleaned ; kid gloves and feathers cleaned and dyed ; gentlemen's coats, pants, vests and cloaks cleaned and pressed, altered and repaired. An assistant is employed and an established and extensive trade won by good work and reasonable prices.

CHARLES RICEMAN, TONSORIAL ARTIST, 
205 FEDERAL STREET.

CHARLES RICEMAN, the Barber, who has been doing business at No. 205 Federal street since 1855, is a native of Camden and a well-known citizen, whose skill and industry have given him an excellent reputation throughout the city. His business is that of a Barber and Hair Dresser. He makes a specialty of Ladies' Hair Cutting, but does all kinds of work in this line. The business room is 14x18 feet in dimensions and contains three chairs. Two assistants are employed, including Edward Rice, the foreman.

The proprietor was born in Camden and was brought up to this business.

151

J. K. STREET, BUILDER AND GENERAL HARDWARE, 
528 FEDERAL STREET.

ONE of the houses that should not be overlooked in this general review of Camden business is that of J. K. Street, dealer in Builders' Hardware, embracing Locks, Hinges, Screens, Nails, Tacks, House and Ship Carpenters' Tools, Spades, Shovels, Hoes and Rakes ; and Housekeeping Articles, in Tubs, Buckets, Baskets, Step Ladders, Tinware, Hollowware, Clothes Horses, Bird Cages, etc.; Table and Pocket Cutlery.

Agency for the Gold Medal Carpet Sweeper, Marion Harland Coffee Pot, and many attractive Art and Mechanical Novelties, No. 528 Federal street.

Mr. Street came from England to America and established himself here in 1870 in this business, fifteen years ago— was in the mercantile line previously— has been at this stand two years. His salesroom is 18x34. He carries a complete assortment of the goods above enumerated, together with many others too varied to be included within the limits of this article. His trade is a large one and the daily sales provide full employment for the proprietor and one assistant. The house is looked upon as one of the most reliable in the city.

DAVID JONES, CUSTOM SHOEMAKER AND DEALER.
332 FEDERAL STREET

DAVID JONES, of 332 Federal Street, is a practical shoemaker, who has by skill and industry made himself a desirable reputation for honest dealing, good work, accuracy in new work and skill in making repairs, in which he excels. He handles ready-made goods and carries a select assortment which includes rubbers and slippers and all kinds of foot wear of good qualities, employing one assistant. The salesroom is 20x30 feet in size and his place is regarded as one of the most reliable in Camden. The business was established here 8 years ago by Mr. Jones himself and has been successful from the start. His only specialties are custom work and repairing.

152

PLANTERS' OYSTER MARKET, WAGNER & REEVES.
FEDERAL AND DAY STREETS 

NO place in Camden offers better facilities or a finer stock of goods than the two gentlemen who conduct the above place. Oysters, Fish, Clams, Crabs, Lobsters, Terrapin and Shad are among the specialties handled early, they being noted for its freshness and excellence.

The individual members of the firm are William B. Reeves and Frank M. Wagner, both wide-awake and energetic young men, whose push and energy have won them a host of friends and acquaintances.

Mr. Wagner was formerly in the employ of the Union News Company, and Mr. Reeves followed the water prior to his engaging in his present avocation, and has been to all parts of the world. In 1861 he enlisted in Co. E, 1st New Jersey Cavalry, under the captaincy of J. W. Kesler, and was present at fifteen of the most important battles of the Civil War, sustaining a severe wound while in the service of his country. Mr. Reeves was in the service of the United States Government for nearly four years during the recent War and served with distinction and honor.

It is an excellently conducted place in every respect, five assistants being employed.

SAMUEL G. EDWARDS, MEATS AND PROVISIONS, 
527 S. 6TH STREET

THE business was started last fall. The store is about 25x70 feet and contains all the newest and most approved fittings.

Here may be found all the choicest cuts that the epicure loves so dearly. Poultry, Butter and Eggs are made specialties of. All kinds of Fruit and Provisions are kept, and always fresh.
Mr. Edwards gives employment to two assistants and one team.

He is a native of the State and is prominently connected with the Odd Fellows and the Ancient Order of United Workmen, and the Red Men.

153

WILSON & CO., CARRIAGE BUILDERS, 
18TH AND FEDERAL
STREETS 

THE Carriage Building industry in this section is well represented in the well known house of Wilson & Co. These gentlemen opened business here about a year ago and have since met with much success.

The main building is about 25x60 feet in dimensions, two stories high. The warerooms are located in an adjoining structure. The special business is Carriages, but all kinds of Wagons are built. Repairing is promptly attended to in the neatest and best manner. Five skilled assistants are constantly employed.

The members of the firm are John Wilson and James M. Carman. Both gentlemen are practical men, having always been in this business.

Mr. Wilson is a member of Post 5. He enlisted in the 4th New Jersey Regiment in 1861, and re-enlisted in the l0th New Jersey Regiment and served four years. In the end of the war he was in Kearney's Brigade.

Mr. Carman was a member of Co. F, 106th Regiment of Pennsylvania, called Baker's Brigade, and was present at many of the important battles of the war.

A POPULAR MARKET

THERE is probably no more popular dealer in meats in this city than is the genial Joseph. B. Carter whose daily business it is to serve a large number of friends and patrons with choice cuts of fresh, city-dressed beef, veal, lamb and mutton at fair prices, from 4 of the stalls in Federal Street Market—4 stalls that are models of neatness and order—that invite the passer-by to stop, and if he stops, ten to one he becomes a purchaser.

Mr. Carter has been in this business continuously since 1865—in this market since 1878. hat goes to show that he finds it profitable and that his patrons have not deserted him to go and do worse with somebody else. He has two assistants, and keeps them busy. Everybody who has been in Camden knows him. He is a native of the city; spent his boyhood in agricultural pursuits; his early manhood as a moulder, and entered E Company of the 4oth Regiment, N. J. Volunteers, participated in some skirmishes, and was honorably discharged at the close of war in 1865. He has served on the city police force, and in every position has maintained a reputation for honesty and uprightness.

154

GEO, W. FERGUSON, MILLINERY, 
456 KAIGHN'S AVENUE.

ONE of the handsomest stores in this neighborhood, in this line, is that owned and conducted by that genial and courteous gentleman, Mr. Geo. W. Ferguson. This business was established by the present proprietor in Centennial year. The store occupied is about 25 x 70 feet in dimensions and is fitted up in the most magnificent style. Here may be found the newest importations and the most beautiful styles that are brought into the market.
A specialty is made of trimming hats to order. All the materials may be purchased here; also all un-trimmed Hats, Bonnets, etc., as well as Flowers, Ribbons and Ornaments.
Six skillful assistants are employed.

Mr. Ferguson is a native of the Empire State, but has been a permanent resident of the city for some time past. He is a member of G. A. R. post, Mystic Chain, Golden Eagles, Red Men and Commercial Club. He went out in the 52d N. G. Regiment and was in the army eighteen months, having been wounded in the battle of Fair Oaks. He is at present commander of W. B. Hatch Post, No. 37.

155


JOHN HUNT

156

JOHN HUNT, CARPET WEAVER, 
18 MARKET STREET

AMONG the business men of Camden, who have been shrewd enough to establish a special line of trade and closely devote themselves to it, none deserve higher commendation for the excellence of work performed than does Mr. John Hunt, the carpet weaver of 18 Market street, where he established himself over sixteen years ago, and has met with uniform success and prosperity ever since.

Two floors, 50 by 30 feet in dimensions, are occupied, five assistants being constantly employed operating the six big looms of which the place boasts. Rag carpet of every description and variety is turned out, and an ample stock is kept on hand for the convenience of transient purchasers.

Everything about the place betokens thrift, energy and enterprise on the part of the proprietor.

Mr. Hunt is a native of England, and has been in this country about forty years, and is highly esteemed here, both socially and in a business sense. As an evidence of the high esteem in which he is held, it may be mentioned that he frequently receives orders from a large distance, having many patrons in the extreme West and South. He is the manufacturer of the celebrated Jersey Lily Carpet, which has just been put upon the market. It is noted for its durability aud weight, combined with beauty in the patterns. Mr. Hunt is by experience in the business one of the most tasteful artists in designing carpets.

WILLIAM BACHRACH, WALL PAPER AND SHADES,
346 KAIGHN'S AVENUE

THIS gentleman is a thoroughly practical man, hav-1 ing been in the business for some time, this store having been opened March 18th, 1890. It is about 20x30 feet in dimensions and here may be found one of the largest stocks of Wall Papers. Table and Floor Oilcloths, Stair Rods, Window Shades and Shade Cloths. All kinds of work is done. Estimates are cheerfully furnished for large contracts. When running normally five skilled decorators are employed and a handsome team is used.

Mr. Bachrach is the Chairman of the Trustees of the Red Ladies and a member of various other social and fraternal societies.

157

S. S. WEAVER, CIGARS, 
232 FEDERAL STREET

THE retail Cigar Store and Factory of S.S. Weaver, at 232 Federal street, enjoys the reputation of being one of the best retail cigar houses in the city. It was established in 1877 by the present proprietor, who removed to this stand five years ago. The salesroom, is 16x16 feet in size, with a factory of 14x18 feet in its rear, in which two assistants are employed. The work done is of the best, as the goods produced are expressly for the retail trade, and this is principally local. Some of the special brands are Commercial, Preferred Stock, Puffs, etc.
Mr. Weaver is a Pennsylvanian by birth, and was born in 1843. In early life he was engaged in farming. In 1862 he entered the Union army, and served with E Company, I35th Pennsylvania Volunteers, for nine months and re-enlisted for three years in the 2oth Pennsylvania Cavalry, in the battle of Chancellorsville and throughout the Shenandoah Valley campaign. Was also a prisoner of war in Andersonville and other rebel prisons for eleven months.

MRS. MARGARET WILSON, NOTIONS, 
418 KAIGHN'S AVENUE

THIS business was established by the present proprietress about two years ago. The store occupied is about 25 x 50 feet in dimensions. A large stock of Dry Goods, Notions, Trimmings, and Small Wares is constantly carried.

Mr. Wilson is a native of this city, and has always been prominent. He is a member of Post 37, G.A.R. He was in the Navy during the late war, and is a practical machinist, and repairs all makes of Sewing Machines. Scissors and Saws are sharpened on the premises, 418 Kaighn's Avenue.

158

JOHN BURKHART, WHOLESALE AND RETAIL TOBACCO & CIGAR DEALER, 
287 KAIGHN'S AVENUE

ORIGINALLY established by J. F. Williams, the present proprietor succeeded to the management of this enterprise in 1890. The salesroom occupied is 18x16 feet in dimensions, comprehensively stocked with a full line of Tobacco, Smoking and Chewing, Pipes, Snuffs, Amber and Meerschaum Goods, and every variety of Cigarettes and Cigars. These goods are distributed to the wholesale and retail trade. this house selling to dealers all over Camden and adjacent counties. Dealers in quest of reliable goods, would do well to form business relations with this establishment. In the prosecution of the business several assistants are employed, and every means is at hand that will in any way foster the interests of the patron.

The subject of the sketch is a native of Waterford, New Jersey, and when the safety of his country was invaded, adopted the knapsack, in 1861, in Co. H, 1st N. J. Volunteers, distinguishing himself in some 18 battles and skirmishes, taken prisoner in "The Seven-days fight," and released after thirty-one days. Mr. Burkhart received an honorable discharge in 1864, after a venturous martial career. Establishing in his present mercantile venture, he is regarded as a reliable dealer.

Mr. Burkhart is made to appear on the army register as Burkhett, that being the name bestowed upon him by his comrades in arms.

Mr. Burkhart is aided in the store by his sons Harry, George and Sebastian, three able and energetic young men.

159

HANDSOME RETAIL BUSINESS

THE exigencies of business, the character of some incidentally discovered need, or any one of many circumstances may suggest, to an observant man or woman, the practicability of some business specialty that, if rightly introduced and understandingly conducted may or will open the way to a marked success, and if intelligently persevered in to an assured commercial triumph. Knowing that certain articles in the line of provisions are not always to be procured, of the best qualities and in their best conditions, from the general or miscellaneous dealer.

George G. Horner, in 1876 established in this city, commenced the business of supplying, direct to customers, the staple articles, Butter, Eggs, Poultry and Cheese. Two years later, in 1878, he found his trade grown to proportions of such importance that he removed into the Federal Street Market, where he now occupies four well kept stalls and is recognized as a reliable purveyor of these goods. 

Mr. Horner is a native of Camden County, and from having previously devoted himself to agricultural pursuits was peculiarly fitted by his experience to handle these goods properly, has been enabled to supply a demand for the best and freshest at little or no more expense to consumers than they usually incur in purchasing the often inferior and frequently impure and unwholesome stock offered by those merchants who have no particular acquaintance with these goods. He sells only at retail, but with one assistant and one team he is able to do a large but select trade among the best families, hotels and restaurants in the city.

Mr. Horner is looked upon in the community as an honorable and substantial citizen, and is now the Treasurer of the United Friends. During the late war he was a herder and shipper in the Federal commissary department. While in that position he took successful charge of the largest transfer of cattle ever taken from any one point in the United States to another, being 500 head of cattle on one boat taken from Washington to City Point, Virginia, in 1864.

160

H. BRIGGS, DRY GOODS AND NOTIONS, 
6th & ELM STREETS

THERE is scarcely a better or more favorably known store in this section of the city, devoting their energies to this line of trade, than that of Mr. H. Briggs. This estimable gentleman opened business here about four months ago, and has thus far been very successful.

The store is about 20x40 feet in dimensions, and is fitted in the most convenient manner. A very heavy stock is carried, comprising Dry Goods, Underwear, Hosiery, Men's Furnishings, Notions, Small Wares, etc. Special bargains are always to be found here.

Mr. Briggs, like many of our most successful merchants, is an Englishman by birth. He is also employed by the Camden Worsted Mills, and much of the detail work of the store devolves upon his wife.

EDWARD K. PICKERING, CIGARS,
659 FERRY AVENUE

AMONG the most prominent stores of this character in this section may be mentioned that of Mr. Pickering. This genial and courteous gentleman opened the business here about three years ago.

The store is about 20 feet square and fitted nicely. Here may be found a large and choice selection of Imported and Domestic Cigars, Smoking and Chewing Tobaccos, Cigarettes, Pipes, and Smokers' Articles are also carried. Two assistants are employed.

Mr. Pickering is an Englishman. He came to this country about twenty-three years ago.

161


G. H. BURT,
PROPRIETOR OF THIS JUSTLY CELEBRATED VIENNA BAKERY.

162

RUDOLPH'S VIENNA BAKERY, 
119 AND 121 ARCH STREET. 
G. H. BURT, Proprietor.

WHEN, during the Centennial in 1876, Vienna Bread was introduced, who would have thought that it would have attained such popularity. Among the first in this city to introduce and sell this bread was Mr. Rudolph.

This gentleman originally established business in 1860, and after managing it successfully many years, sold out the business in May, 1889, to the present proprietor, Mr. G. H. Burt. The premises occupied consist of a two story building about 40x150 feet in dimensions. The bakery is in every way furnished in the most complete manner. A special oven is used for the baking of Vienna Bread, the only one of its character in this city. In addition, all kinds of Bread and Rolls are made. The capacity being about 3800 loaves daily at a consumption of 75 barrels of flour weekly. The trade is both wholesale and retail, extending all over this and the adjoining counties. The constant services of 16 capable men are required and 6 teams are used to deliver to the trade.

Mr. Burt has been a well-known resident of the city for the past 30 years. He is at present Overseer of Weights and Measures in this city.

163 

WEST JERSEY PAPER COMPANY, PAPER MANUFACTURERS
FRONT & ELM STREETS 

THERE is no larger factory in Camden that is devoted exclusively to the manufacture of heavy papers than that owned and operated by the West Jersey Paper Co. The concern was organized in 1879.

The mill has a frontage of 150 feet on Elm street and a depth of over 140 feet on North Front street. Everything is done here, from the cutting of the rags and jute to the moving out of the paper in the roll and sheet. It would require too much space to treat on the manufacture of paper in general, but it is enough to say that no mill in the country is better equipped than this one. All grades of manlla rope paper are put on the market, as well as a great many special grades, which have met with much success. When running normally, the firm has in their employ 40 skilled and capable workmen.

The officers of the corporation are Lewis Seal, Esq., President; Thos. S. Safford, Treasurer, and Jas. W. Chalmers, Secretary, — all residents of this city, and an estimable triumvirate of prosperous business men.

J. W. EARLEY, CONFECTIONERY, 
437 S. 5th STREET

THIS business was established by the present owner about thirteen years ago, at the same stand that he now occupies. The building has a frontage of 20 feet on Fifth street and a depth of 80 feet.

All kinds of fresh Candies are offered for sale, these being manufactured on the premises and right under the supervision of the proprietor, who is a very careful and watchful man, and sees that no impurities are allowed to get in. One of the principal things in the business is the manufacture of Ice Cream, which is carried on to a very large extent. This is sold at wholesale as well as retail.

The Ice Cream Saloon connected with the establishment has a seating capacity of over fifty people, and very frequently, during the summer time, this is not large enough for the number of patrons. Mr. Earley has in his constant employ five well-trained assistants, who are ever on the alert looking after his interests.

He is a native of Gloucester County, N. J., but has been an esteemed resident of Camden for many years.

164

LANGENDORF'S JEWELRY STORE, 
320 FEDERAL. STREET

THE oldest Jewelry house in Camden is that of D. G. Langendorf, Jeweler and Watchmaker, who established himself here in 1865. He has a fine salesroom of 20 x 80 feet, amply stocked with everything belonging to this line of trade, including American and Swiss Watches, Clocks (American and French), Silverware of fine qualities and elegant in design, Optical Goods, Gold-headed Canes, and a fine selection of Diamonds, Umbrellas, Bronzes, and a choice collection of Fancy Goods. Several assistants are employed, and Repairing is made a prominent specialty.

Mr. Langendorf is a native of Bohemia, and was always a jeweler. He came to this country thirty-four years ago, in his boyhood, and is as thoroughly an American as if he had been born under the Stars and Stripes, whose enemies he encountered while serving in F Company of the 32d Regiment Pennsylvania Volunteers, at Hagerstown and elsewhere.

ROBERT H. PATTON, 
538 FEDERAL. STREET

ABOUT twenty years ago, after an extended experience in Philadelphia, among the best firms, Robert H. Patton established himself here, No. 538 Federal street, where he has a salesroom of 18 x 38 feet and a cellar for storage.

The place is well stocked with an assortment of fine Wall Papers, Window Shades, Shade Fixtures, Oil Cloths, Rugs and other goods in this line. He is a practical man, knows the requirements of his trade and where to obtain them at the best rates.

Mr. Patton fills many contracts for fine paper hanging—plain and decorative,—and is prepared to fill all orders for Window Shades, which he will make and hang to order. Since establishing here he has won the respect and esteem of all with whom he holds business relations.

165

G. W. SWOPE, WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALER IN MEATS AND PROVISIONS, 
N. W. CORNER OF 11th AND FEDERAL STREETS 

ESTABLISHED in this business about twenty-five years ago and removed to the present quarters some ten years since and now occupies a commodious place 33x20 feet in dimensions. The stock partly consists of Beef, Veal, Lamb, etc., which is home-dressed and is disposed of both wholesale and retail. The capacity of his slaughter house being about 2,500 to 3,000 pounds of beef per week.

Sausage, Scrapple, Lard, etc., are also manufactured on the premises; 8,000 to 10,000 pounds of pork being disposed of weekly. A mammoth refrigerator, with a capacity for 1,000 pounds of ice, is a feature of the establishment. Three active and obliging assistants are employed and a team is used to facilitate business.

Mr. Swope is a native of Camden, and during the rebellion was actively engaged both as a soldier, taking an active part in the battles of Fredericksburg and Culpepper, and being himself discharged in '65 on Lee's surrender. He was also active in 1861 in U.S.Military R.R. C. as a bridge builder and an engineer. Personally he is greatly liked both in a business sense and socially.

166

CHARLES HELM, WHOLESALE & RETAIL BUTCHER, 
N. W. CORNER OF THIRD & ARCH STREETS 

THE introduction of Chicago meat into the Eastern markets has in a great way affected many of our dealers, but some of the best known have been able to withstand their all-engulfing arms, among them Mr. Charles Helm. This gentleman established business in this city about twenty-five years ago, and later a branch store was opened on Haddon avenue ; close by this the slaughter-house is located.

All meat for sale in either of Mr. Helm's stores is killed in this city. About 15 cattle, 20 sheep and a number of calves and lambs a week.
Great care is used in the preparation of meat; all the best appliances are used, and the meat is stored in immense ice-houses. In conjunction with the meat business, Vegetables, Fruits and Produce of all kinds is carried in both stores.
The trade is both wholesale and retail, extending all over this and the adjoining counties.

Mr. Helm is a native of Philadelphia, but has played a prominent part in Camden's history for the past thirty-five years.

CAMDEN GRAIN CO., DEALERS IN FLOUR, GRAIN, FEED, SEEDS, Etc.,
21 MARKET STREET

AMONG the many comparatively new enterprises which the present year has brought forth in the business life of Camden, none deserve more special reference than the above, who occupy a wareroom 22x55 feet in dimensions, amply stocked with the best and most approved brands of Flour, Grain, Feed, Hay, Salt, Plaster, etc., as well as a line of Plows and other agricultural implements.

In addition to the wareroom on Market Street two large stone houses are also occupied by the comprehensive stock, all of which, despite its large size, is kept up to a standard of unquestionable excellence. Five employees are kept at work and a team is used in the successful transaction of business.

The manager of the concern is Mr. J. W. Taylor than whom it would be impossible to find a more competent man, being fitted both by an experience of 18 years and by personal ability to the sale of this line of goods. He is a native of Burlington County but has been a resident of Camden for 18 years He is highly esteemed in both social and business circles.

107

J. E. BOARDMAN, PAINTER, 
120 N. THIRD STREET

THERE is scarcely any line that requires the amount A of careful attention that painting does, and there is no more careful and attentive gentleman in the business than Mr. J. E. Boardman, who has devoted the best part of his life to this line. He formerly had an establishment at 43 N. 3d street, but last Fall, finding that his business was growing too large for his place, he moved to the commodious building located at 120 N. 3d street, which has a frontage of 25 feet and depth of about 70 feet.

Anything in the painting line can be done by Mr. Boardman; all kinds of House Painting, Graining, and finishing Hard Woods, besides all kinds of renovating of Brick Fronts ; in fact, anything in this branch of trade. He does Sign Painting in another department expressly for the purpose.

The successful operation of the business requires the employment of 15 men most of the time and sometimes many more are engaged to fulfill large contracts.

Mr. Boardman has always been a well-known resident of Camden, and esteemed in trade circles as an upright man of business principles.

MRS. KATE DeNISE, GROCER, 
1701 FILLMORE STREET

THIS estimable lady opened this business about three months ago. The store itself is about 20 feet front and 30 feet deep. It is fitted in a very handsome and commodious manner. A large and varied stock is carried, and comprises a full line of Sugars, Spices, Teas, Coffees, Flour, and the many articles that belong in this branch. Provisions, Fresh Fruits and Salt Meats are made a specialty of. Three efficient assistants are constantly employed.

Mrs. DeNise has always been one of the city's most respected residents.

168

F. H. VOLLMER, BAKER, 
6th & ELM STREETS

THERE are but few businesses that require more A skill and constant attention than this one. Among the best and most favorably known in this vicinity may be mentioned Mr. F. H. Vollmer. This gentleman purchased the business a short time ago from Mr. J. Masner, who established it some years ago.

The premises are about 20 x 85 feet in dimensions. The Bakery is located in the basement. Every device tending to lessen labor is used. Bread, Pies and Cakes of all kinds are made. Ice Cream is also made. The services of several capable men are constantly required, and a team is kept to deliver bread to the regular customers.

Mr. Vollmer has always been a resident of Philadelphia, but came here a short time ago.

SILAS LETCHFORD, GROCER, 
1938 FILLMORE STREET

THIS gentleman opened here about five years ago. The store is a corner one about 20x25 fe£t in dimensions and fitted in the best manner. A large stock of Groceries, Canned Goods, Spices, etc., is always to be found here. Fresh and Salt meats are also extensively handled. Imported and Domestic Fruits and Provisions are paid especial attention to. Three capable assistants are constantly employed and one team is used to deliver orders.

Mr. Letchford is an Englishman by birth, but has become a well known resident of this county where he has resided for nearly a quarter of a century. He is an active member of the Chieftain's League, Red Men, and has been through all chairs, for over 18 years; and was one of the original members of Knights of labor. Prior to engaging in business he followed the avocation of a painter for many years. Is now a highly esteemed merchant and property owner.

169


G. W. BURROUGHS,
WHO HAS BEEN IN BUSINESS HERE FOR OVER A QUARTER OK A CENTURY.

170

G. W. BURROUGHS, 
1636 & 1638 BROADWAY.

AMONG the largest and best known houses in this section may be mentioned that of Mr. G. W. Burroughs. This gentleman opened business here nearly a quarter of a century ago, and success has been with him ever since. The stores are about 38 feet front and 30 in depth, and fitted in the best manner. A large and varied stock of Men's, Ladies', Misses', and Children's Shoes are handled. A big line of Gent's Furnishing Goods is also kept. The newest and most popular styles are always to be found here. Hats, Caps, Trunks, Valises, etc., are also handled. Three capable assistants are constantly employed.

Mr. Burroughs is an active member of Post 5, G. A. R., Odd Fellows, and the Independent Order of Mechanics.

171

J. C. De La COUR'S PHARMACY,
3rd AND ARCH STS

CERTAINLY the oldest and best known Pharmacy in this city is that of Mr. J. C. DeLa Cour. This business was originally established in March, 1836, by Mr. J. C. De La Cour, who managed it successfully for many years, his son then took the management and kept it until December, 1889, when he died, and his son, Mr. J. C. DeLa Cour, Jr., took the active management, while his grandfather, the original proprietor, is still in the business but not actively.

The premises consist of a large store about 25x50 feet in dimensions, with the laboratory and compounding rooms in the rear and upstairs. The trade is both wholesale and retail, extending all over the city and county. The firm are manufacturers of all kinds of Plasters and Specialties for the trade. Constant employment is given to about eight capable men. The store is entirely furnished in marble and is one of the most commodious in the city.

The family have always been prominent in public as well as private life. Mr. J. C. De La Cour, Sr., has been a member of the Board of Education for many years; Mr. J. C. is a Secretary of the Board, and a Past Deputy Grand Master of the Masonic Fraternity of the State of New Jersey.

L. E. ROBERTS, HATS AND FINE FURNISHINGS.
THIRD & FEDERAL STREETS

THE furnishing goods business is now an enormous branch of industry, and employs many thousands of men, women and children, and nothing in it is more remarkable than its rapid development. The house we now mention was established by Andrews & Bro., who were succeeded in 1886 by the present proprietor, L. E. Roberts.

This fine store is situated at the corner of Third and Federal Streets. The salesroom is 38x44 feet in dimensions, and the trade is Hats and Furnishing Goods, of which a heavy stock is always carried, and the assortment embraces everything desirable in both departments. The trade is large and requires the services of several assistants.

Mr. Roberts was born in Pennsylvania, but has resided in Camden for the past fifteen years. He was formerly a watch-case manufacturer in Philadelphia. He is a member of the Masonic Order and of the Camden Club.

THOMAS COYLE, LIQUORS FOR MEDICINAL PURPOSES, 
333 ARCH STREET

THE use of liquor for medicinal purposes is strongly recommended by nearly all eminent physicians; the great care must be used to obtain pure and unadulterated goods. There are several persons in the city who devote their energies to the trade, but none are better or more favorably known than Mr. Thomas Coyle. This gentleman opened business in this city about 4 years ago.

All grades of Whiskey, Wines, Brandies, Rums and Cordials are handled. Every article sold is warranted perfectly pure, as it is sold without any change from the bonded storehouse.
Mr. Coyle has been in his day a great traveler, having been all around the world, and having done business nearly all over the country. He is a great believer in a high license law but thinks that it should be so adjusted as to give equal privileges to all dealers who are of a good moral character.

For Bowel Complaints, Mr. Coyle's Cherry Brandy; for Dyspepsia, his New England Rum; for Kidney Trouble, his Pure Holland Gin, give universal satisfaction.

173

PATRICK POWELL, UNDERTAKER, 
702 FEDERAL STREET.

THE last attention we are permitted to bestow upon our friends is to bury them. But we wish to do this with a degree of ceremony designed to be expressive of our affection, friendship and respect. Many great improvements have been introduced into the ceremony of preparing the bodies of the dead for burial, and of constructing the caskets for the reception of the bodies. One of the largest of the furnishing undertakers in this city is to be found at 702 Federal Street, the handsome establishment of Patrick Powell, Funeral Director and Morgue Keeper, Coffin and Casket Manufacturer. Mr. Powell embarked in this business in 1879. His office is 20x16 feet in size, workshop 20x35 feet> and wareroom 12x16 feet. He carries a large assortment of burial robes, lining, etc., in stock; manufactures burial robes and does embalming. He learned this business in an apprenticeship of 8 years; was before that a grocer. His business is so large as to require three assistants and two dead-wagons.

Mr. Powell was born in Ireland, but came to America in 1854, and was in the coal and ice business in Bordentown, N. J., in the capacity of superintendent, and was also at one time in the employ of the old Camden & Amboy Railroad Company; he has held the position of morgue keeper for the past 6 years. The morgue is built upon his own ground, expressly for keeping the bodies found. Telephone, 204.

WILLIAM OSBORN, CONFECTIONERY, 
1707 BROADWAY

THIS business was established here some time ago by the present proprietor's mother, Mrs. A.L. Osborn, and her son took the business about six months ago. The store is about 20 feet square and in it may be found a large line of Toys, Stationery and Fancy Goods, as well as a full line of Confectionery. Two capable assistants are constantly employed.

Mr. Osborn has been a well known resident of this section for the past fourteen years.
This is the only Government Stamp Agency in this ward, and is a great convenience to the neighborhood in consequence.

174

J. H. COUNTISS, HARDWARE, ETC., 
BROADWAY AND FERRY AVENUE [1744 Broadway]

THIS gentleman opened the store on this corner about 5 years ago and has met with great success. The store is about 20x35 feet in dimensions, and fitted in the best possible manner. A large and varied stock of Hardware, Paints and House furnishing Goods is kept. Special attention is paid to the small details that are so numerous in the business. Three capable assistants are employed and a team is kept running constantly.

Mr. Countiss is a native of Delaware but has been a resident of this section for the past ten years.

HENRY WIRTH, FINE GROCERIES AND PROVISIONS, 
FEDERAL AND 11th STREETS 

THIS gentleman started in business here in March, A 1890, prior to which time he was located at the Market House, Fifth and Federal Streets. He occupies a neatly fitted up salesroom, 25x25 feet in dimensions, and carries a stock which consists of Fancy Groceries, Canned Goods of all kinds, Fancy Cheeses, Dried Fruits, etc.

Several able and alert employees are employed and a team is used for delivery purposes.
Mr. Wirth is a native of Germany and has resided in Camden for the last ten years; he is highly esteemed in the community and is universally regarded as a business man of reliability.

P. J. MULLANE, BOOT AND SHOE MAKER, 
5th AND ARCH STREETS.

ONE of the best known establishments in this vicinity is that of Mr. P. T. Mullane. This estimable young gentleman started business here about 3 years ago. The premises occupied consist of a store and basement. The latter being used as a workshop. Boots and Shoes of all kinds are made to order. Particular attention is paid to repairing, it always being done in the best and most careful manner. A large stock of Cigars, Tobacco and smokers articles are also sold.

Mr. Mullane has been a life-long resident of Camden and is very well known to a large circle of friends.

175

J. FARRELL, TIN AND SHEET-IRON WORKER, 
24 MARKET STREET.

THIS well-known business house was established in 1875 by Mr. John Farrell, recently deceased. It is now conducted in the interest of that gentleman's estate, being managed by the late Mr. Farrell's, young man of uncommon business energy and promise.

A well arranged salesroom, 22x50 feet in dimensions, is well stocked with Stoves, Heaters, Ranges and roofing material. Heaters being manufactured on the premises. Two large workrooms, of equal size with that devoted to sales purposes, being used for manufacturing purposes, and six competent employees being constantly at work there, and two teams being used in the successful prosecution of this business.

The present manager of the business is a native of Camden and a successful business career doubtless awaits him.

176

SAMUEL H. DAWSON, PROVISIONS, 
FEDERAL STREET MARKET

COMPETITION is the Life of Trade," an old and trite saying, and one that has more meaning at the present period than ever before— it not only keeps prices down to a reasonable figure, but it engenders a strife for the production of better goods, as only the fittest can survive. Samuel H. Dawson, who occupies four stalls in the Federal Street Market, and who deals largely in Butter, Eggs and Cheese, at wholesale and retail. He has several assistants and runs a delivery team. He has established a large and profitable trade, and numbers among his patrons many of the first families of the city, and sells largely to the grocery trade.

Mr. Dawson was born in Glassboro, N. J., and learned the trade of glass-blower at Williamstown. He has been in the market business for the past 20 years, 17 of which were passed in Philadelphia i2th Street Market. He is widely known and popular, and is looked upon as a deservedly successful citizen, and certainly deserves the patronage of all who require goods in his line.

CHARLES H. LAIRD,  DRY GOODS AND NOTIONS
1642 BROADWAY

THIS gentleman opened business at 1638 Broadway about 8 years ago, and finding that more desirable quarters were to be procured here made the move last year. The business is under the active management of his wife; this estimable lady is a thoroughly practical business woman.

The store is about 20x40 feet in dimensions, and fitted in the best manner. A large and varied stock is carried, comprising all kind of Dry Goods, Hosiery, Underwear, Notions, Ribbons, Embroidery Materials, Fancy Goods, and Small Wares. Two capable assistants are constantly employed.

Mr. Laird is a native of Philadelphia but has become an esteemed and well known resident of this city.

J. A. GASKILL, CONFECTIONERY, ICE CREAM AND OYSTER SALOON, 
766 FEDERAL STREET

THIS gentleman opened business about two years ago and has met with success, caused by thoroughness in constant business principles. The store is about 18x25 feet in dimensions and fitted up nicely. A dining room, capable of seating ten persons, is located in the rear.
A general line of Confectionery, Newspapers, Periodicals, etc., is constantly carried in stock. Several assistants are employed in the prosecution of the business.
Mr. Gaskill has always been one of Camden's most esteemed residents, and in connection with his business he conducts the business of a plasterer as well as real estate dealer.

177

HOWLAND CROFT, SONS & CO., LINDEN WORSTED MILLS, 
BROADWAY AND JEFFERSON AVENUE.

AMONG the worsted and woolen mills of Camden a conspicuous building is that belonging to Messrs. Howland Croft, Sons & Co., formerly Croft & Priestley, known as the Linden Worsted Mills, now located at Broadway and Jefferson avenue. The factory was established in 1880, under the present style, at the corner of Front and Linden streets, whence its name. It was a successful institution from the commencement, and remained at the old location until 1885, when the fine new building now occupied was erected on ground purchased for the purpose. The area of the ground occupied is 200 by 415 feet, and the buildings—all of brick and four stories in height—consist of three separate structures, each one being devote I to its own special department. They are: the mill proper, of the extent of 50 by 240 feet; the wool warehouse, of 100 by 40 feet, and the offices and storerooms, of the size of 80 by 30 feet. The force of hands is 400.

The goods manufactured are worsted and woolen yarns in all the various grades and colors, and the brands of their goods enjoy a high reputation in the market.

The members of the firm at first were Howland Croft and Herbert Priestley. In November, 1886, Mr. Priestley died, and thence until March i, 1889, the management devolved upon Mr. Croft. At the latter date the three sons of Mr. Croft, were joined with him in partnership, and the firm style became How-land Croft, Sons & Co. The names of the junior members are Mr. John William Croft, Mr. George Howland Croft and Mr. Samuel Granger Croft.
The handsome engravings accompanying this too brief sketch of what is undoubtedly the leading commercial undertaking of South Camden, consist of a reproduction of the spacious buildings and of a portrait of Mr. Howland Croft. A journey through the numerous apartments of the mills shows that not only is the machinery and all appointments of the concern of the latest and most approved character that modern ingenuity and skill, backed by the most ample capital, could attain and operated by a colossal engine, whose mammoth proportions excite the wonder and amazement of all observers, and seems by its magnitude to rival the glories of the celebrated Corliss engine at the Centennial Exposition at Philadelphia; but its sanitary condition is carefully looked after, and a more contented and happier set of work-people is seldom seen in a large industrial enterprise.

The story of Mr. Croft's life would be more readable than a romance, illustrating as it does the immense possibilities which the present age holds in trust for men of energy, pluck, perseverance and tried integrity, upon whom it heaps its richest rewards and crowns with its loftiest esteem. From the present summit of his well-won success, Mr. Croft cannot fail to contemplate, with feelings of the most entire satisfaction, the roadway over which he has journeyed and which is strewn with the conquests of laudable ambition over all difficulties. Personally one of the most genial and courteous of men, his simple and unostentatious habits of life have never been perverted by his great wealth and influence, and this fact tends to endear him to all with whom he is brought in contact, both in a business sense and socially.
After earnest solicitation, he has consented to act as Vice-President of the Board of Trade of the City of Camden, and by his presence in that body will add to its dignity and the force of its membership, being a practical man whose executive ability has never been questioned, while his enthusiastic endorsement of every movement looking to the City of Camden's interest is widely appreciated.

178

STEPHEN TITUS, HATS, FURNISHING GOODS, ETC.,
316 FEDERAL STREET

THIS large and popular store and factory is the well known center of a business that was established here in 1855. The premises occupied for the purposes of the business are a fine salesroom of ample dimensions and a factory in the rear. Here the proprietor and seven or eight assistants are employed in the manufacture of Silk, Soft and Stiff Felt Hats. The trade embraces beside Hats a complete line of Furnishing Goods, Trunks, Satchels, Traveling Bags and Dressing Cases. A very fine stock designed expressly for retail trade. A special feature is done in the manufacture of Trunks. Mr. Titus is a native of the State and is a hatter by trade ; is highly respected among his fellow-citizens as a gentleman of worth and integrity.

Emerson P. Osborn is the manager, and has been with Mr. Titus for the past twenty-seven years as a salesman, a fact that speaks highly for both of them. Indeed, it would be difficult to find two men in business together for so long a period without recognizing the sterling worth that makes such a relation, so long continued, possible.

Chas. E. Graham is an able assistant connected with the house for many years and a gentleman of worth and business integrity. Since establishing here they have won the esteem of all with whom they hold business relations.

179

MITCHELL MANN, CIGARS, TOBACCO AND FRUIT, 
27 KAIGHN'S AVENUE

AN old established stand is this, and the gentleman whose name leads this review took possession of the place nearly one year ago. The salesroom occupied for the purposes of the business is 12 x 16 feet in dimensions, and the stock embraces all the leading brands of Smoking and Chewing Tobaccos, Snuffs, Pipes, Cigarettes and Smokers' Articles generally. A fine line of Confectionery and Fruit is also kept, and in the summer season all kinds of soft drinks, as well as Flowers. To facilitate the progress of the work, a competent assistant is employed.

Born in France, Mr. Mann has been a resident of this country for the past thirty years, part of which was spent in the United States Navy, as well as in the Merchants' service since 1868.
Since establishing here he has won the esteem of all with whom he deals, and is respected in trade circles as a responsible dealer.


J. BRANT & SON, LIVERY STABLE,
39 & 41 N. FRONT STREET

THESE courteous gentlemen are well acquainted with the care of horses, and make it their special business to look after the stock driven by some of the best people in town. They have a very commodious stable, with a frontage of 40 feet on Front street and a depth of no feet. They have about twenty-five head of horses and between thirty and forty wagons at present, and are constantly adding more to their stock.

Mr. Brant is a native of Gloucester county, but has been a resident of Camden for some time.

180

MRS, D. L. LAMB, GROCERY ESTABLISHMENT, 
250 KAIGHN'S AVENUE

ORIGINALLY founded by Charles C. Hess, the lady whose name heads this article succeeded him five years ago.

The salesroom occupied is 16x28 feet in dimensions, containing a choice line of Groceries and Provisions, Canned and Bottled Goods, Syrups, fine English and Breakfast Teas, free from dust or deleterious substances; pure Spices and Coffees, laundry and Toilet requisites, Fresh and Salt Meats, and all the goods usually found in a first-class stock of groceries, as well as Fancy Cakes, Pies, Cigars and Tobaccos. In the prosecution of this business, an assistant is employed, and no means spared that will in any way foster the interests of the patron.

Daniel Lamb, her son, manages the establishment, and through his endeavors a select trade is enjoyed. Mrs. Lamb has spent some seven years in the grocery business. 

A native of Turnersville, N. J., Mrs. Lamb has proven herself a conscientious business woman, and both mother and son are respected in trade circles as reliable dealers.

FRED. PHILE, MEATS AND PROVISIONS, 
FIFTH & BENSON STREETS 

NO store in this section of the city is any better known than the establishment of Mr. Fred. Phile. He has been in this line for a number of years, and knows where to find the choicest of all the markets, and gives his customers the benefit of his knowledge in the carefully selected stock which he carries on hand.

The business was opened here by him in 1880, in the same building which he now occupies, the dimensions of which are about 25 x 100 feet. All kinds of Fresh and Salt Meats are kept. The thousand and one things that go to make a full stock are all to be found here—all qualities of Coffees, Teas, Sugars, Spices, etc. One specialty that is made is Butter and Eggs, the finest of which are always to be found here. Fresh Fish is also kept on ice all the time.

Mr. Phile is a native of Philadelphia, but has been identified with the best interests of Camden since Centennial year. Mr. Phile is an old sailor, having gone out in the Powhatan in 1861 ; he was on her for two years. Of late years he has been connected with that famous resort for veterans, Post 37, of which he is an active member.

181

HEULINGS & GREGORY, TRIMMINGS, 
226 MARKET STREET

THIS business has been established many years, the present owners having purchased the interest of a Miss Harrison in 1863.

The store occupied is abgut 18x30 feet in dimensions. The stock is large and varied ; there may be found anything that pertains to the line— all kinds of Dry Goods, Trimmings, Notions, Hosiery, Underwear and Fancy Goods. Two assistants are employed.

Miss K. M. Heulings and Miss M. A. Gregory are the individual members of the firm. These two well-known ladies have been residents of the city for many years, winning the respect and esteem of all with whom they hold business relations.

CAMDEN BOTTLING COMPANY, 
21 FEDERAL STREET

THE occupation of "bottler" has grown into especial prominence within a comparatively few years but is now an industry that keeps many establishments in active operation in all parts of the country.

The concern known as the Camden Bottling Company has its place of business at 21 Federal street, and occupies the time of eight men, besides the Manager, M. Hertz, who is also the sole owner. Three teams are employed to deliver the product, which includes drinks '' soft'' and otherwise. The latest improved machinery is used, and the capacity of the works is about twenty-five barrels a day, produced by steam-power. The building is 20 feet in front by 100 feet in depth. The goods have high reputation.

182

MANUEL VIDAL, CIGARS, ETC.
120 FEDERAL STREET

SIX years ago the cigar store and factory at 120 Federal street was started by its present proprietor, Manuel Vidal, known as the "Spanish Cigarmaker", and has occupied its present location for the past two years.

The salesroom is 12x12 feet in dimensions, and the factory is in its rear. All the cigars sold here are made on the premises, of good stock, expressly for local trade—among the especial favorites is the brand known as La Candela.

The entire building, three stories, is used for the purposes of the business, which requires the services of six assistants.

Mr. Vidal was always a cigarmaker, and came to this country from Cuba in 1872. He also runs a branch store at 33 Market street.

CHARLES F. HOLLINGSHEAD, FOUNDRY AND IRON WORKS, 
COOPER'S POINT.

THIS business has been established many years; the present proprietor having taken hold of it in 1867. A large shop, 120x150 feet in dimensions, is used; this is fitted with the newest and best machinery. Everything in the iron works line can be turned out by this establishment; among the many specialties are Wraught Iron Doors, Fire Escapes,. Fencing, Awnings, Roof Castings, Builders' Iron Work, Steam Engines, Boilers, and all kind of work in this line. Mill and Steam Tow-Boat Repairs are also done with care and skill. Thirty skilled workmen are constantly employed.

Mr. Hollingshead is a native of Philadelphia but has been an esteemed resident of the city for some time past. He is prominently identified with various fraternal organizations, being Secretary of Royal Arch Chapter, Secretary of Cyrene Commandery, and Past Master of the Blue Lodge.

183


JACOB SCHUMACHER

184

JACOB SCHUMACHER, MANUFACTURING TAILOR
318 FEDERAL STREET

A THRIVING industry, employing many hands, is located at 318 Federal street. It was established in 1879, at 411 on the same street, but removed to this stand in 1889.
The premises occupied by this large business comprise the salesroom of 17 x 32 feet, a spacious workroom in the rear and others upon the upper floors of the building. The business is merchant and manufacturing tailoring. The first-named branch alone employs sixteen hands, while in the latter thirty-two bends are engaged in the manufacture of pantaloons by steam power. A large wholesale trade in this State and Pennsylvania is supplied by this house.

The proprietor, Jacob Schumacher, is a German by birth, but came to America in 1860. He is a tailor by trade and was formerly foreman for Blumenthal Bros., Philadelphia, before starting in business for himself. His son William is connected with the concern as cutter in the merchant tailoring department. Henry Schumacher is traveling salesman for this house.

185

JAMES R. CARSON, GROCERIES AND PROVISIONS, 
515 N. THIRD STREET

FOR the past sixteen years this gentleman has been located here. He carries in stock a full line of the finest grades of Teas, Coffees, Sugars, Fresh and Dried Fruits, Butter, Eggs, all the Fresh Vegetables in season. He employs three efficient assistants and uses a team.

Mr. Carson has always been a prominent citizen of Camden, having served eight years, three of which as its President in the Board of Education. He is at present President of the North Camden Economy Building Association, also President of the Camden City and County Building Association League, two of the strongest associations here, and a prominent member of Post 5, G. A. R., having served three years in the 2oth Illinois Infantry.

ANDREAS BECK, TONSORIAL ARTIST,
No. 116 FEDERAL STREET

A NEATLY equipped and popular barber shop is an incalculable convenience in any neighborhood in which people live. Such an establishment is that of Andreas Beck, No. 116 Federal Street. It was established in the Fall of 1855, and is 11x28 feet in dimensions, and does a business requiring four chairs.

Mr. Beck, the proprietor, is a native of Germany and came here thirty-four years ago. He is a barber by trade; is now President of the Barbers' Sunday Closing Association, the only organization of its kind ever made sufficiently effective to carry out the object for which it was formed.

Mr. Beck's entire business career has been in this place, in which he learned his trade, and in 1860 purchased the business of his predecessor, John Jacob Somers, the founder of the shop.

186

MRS. DORCAS BAKER, TRIMMINGS AND NOTIONS, 
521 S. FIFTH STREET

THE present proprietress has been located in the same building for over a score of years, and the experience and good judgment that is used in selecting the stock, may be seen upon looking carefully at it. 

A full line of all sorts of Dry Goods is carried. All kinds of Underwear and Hosiery are carried from the finest to the cheapest grades. In this establishment may be found all the small wares, Notions and Fancy Goods that can well be imagined. The proprietress having had such a long experience in the line that she is enabled to know just what is needed. Two assistants are kept busy.

Mrs. Baker is a native of Bakersville, N. J., but has been so long a resident of Camden that she may almost be called a native.

MRS. COLEMAN, HAIR DRESSER, 
218 FEDERAL STREET

THE Dressing of Ladies' Hair has always been justly regarded as an art of exceptional importance. Mrs. C. Coleman, a lady who has an experience of eight years in this line, and is a practical hair dresser, is the proprietress of the very attractive parlors at No. 218 Federal Street, where all orders are promptly executed, and work done in the best style. She established herself in this place in 1889, in a store of 20x16 feet in dimensions. Shampooing, Bangs-Cutting and Dressing, and all other departments receive the personal attention of the proprietress. "Golden Hair Wash" and "Dollard's Hair Tonic " are kept in stock. Mrs. Coleman was born in Philadelphia where she learned her art.

187

D. W. WHITE, FLORIST, 
FEDERAL AND ARCH STREETS 

THIS gentleman opened the business here about five years ago and has met with phenomenal success. The greenhouse in the city is large and handsome, besides this five other houses are used, these are located at Collingswood, N. J.
All kinds of Flowers and Plants are kept as well as a large variety of Cut Flowers.
Special attention is paid to orders in the way of Designs and Boquets. Flower Seeds are also sold extensively. Three capable assistants are kept busy and one team is employed.

Mr. White is a native of Collinswood, N. J., and has always been a well-known person in this city.

S. F. RUDDEROW & SON, HARDWARE, 
N.W. CORNER OF FRONT AND MARKET STREETS

AMONG Camden's leading business houses is the magnificent three-story structure on the N. W. corner of Front and Market Streets. The buildings occupied have a frontage of 78 and a depth of 100 feet. The entire three floors being occupied in the successful prosecution of the exceeding large business done by this house which employs over a dozen hands and uses three teams to facilitate its transaction.

Hardware of all grades, whether light or heavy, is to be found in ample assortment in its spacious salesrooms which occupy the whole of the entire building's floor together with Builders' Supplies, Paints, Oils, Glass, Pitch, and Oakum, in infinite variety, constitute the stock on hand. Mill-work, Doors, Sashes, Blinds, Mouldings, are also on the premises on the third floor and are offered to the patrons of this house at unusually advantageous prices.

Established in 1878 by the present proprietors. New ideas and progressive business methods have characterized the firm's efforts at all times, and the large business done is the well merited reward of enterprise and push.

The members of the firm are both natives of Camden and are reckoned among its representative business men. The Senior member, Mr. S. F. Rudderow, during the year of 1860-61 was the local tax collector and acquitted himself creditably at a time when the holder of that office occupied anything but a sinecure. He is a bright and affable gentleman in the prime of life.

A large three-story warehouse is now in process of erection.

188

SAMUEL RICHMAN, FLOUR, FEED AND GRAIN WAREHOUSE, 
1131 and 1133 FEDERAL STREET

ORIGINALLY established in 1880 by Charles Killinger, the establishment is now the property of Mr. Samuel Richman, and is the largest place of its kind in this section of Camden. The stock consists of Flour, Feed, Hay, Straw and all accessories to the business. Two assistants are regularly employed and two teams are used in the successful prosecution of the trade.
The salesrooms are 40x60 feet in dimensions, and commodious storage rooms are also at the disposal of this house.Hauling and Teaming is made a feature of especial interest, and teams are let out to hire.

Mr. Richman is a native of Camden, and is highly esteemed in the community, and was actively engaged in the service of hauling food and shelter for man and beast in the late rebellion. He is regarded as an energetic business man and citizen.

WILLIAM KEMMERER, PLAIN AND FANCY CAKE BAKERY, 
1105 FEDERAL STREET

IN the bakery business none stand higher in the esteem of Camden's citizens than the subject of this brief sketch. Established in 1888 in the building he now occupies and which was built for his purpose. It has a salesroom 16x24 feet in dimensions, and the stock carried consists of everything in the baking line including Fancy and Plain Cakes, Pies, etc. A line of Candy being also carried.

Bread is served by two teams to all sections of Camden, including Liberty Park, Merchantville, Pavonia, etc.. and five assistants are regularly employed. The capacity of the bakery being some 18 or 20 barrels of flour a week.

Mr. Kemmerer is a native of Germany and came to this country in 1869. He is highly regarded in the community.

189

C. W. SHELDON, GRAIN, FLOUR AND FEED, 
420 and 422 S. FIFTH STREET

ONE of the oldest established houses in this line is that conducted by Mr. C. W. Sheldon at 420 and 422 S. Fifth Street. The present head of the firm succeeded Mr. Frank Whittaker about three years ago. The building occupied has a frontage on Fifth Street of 40 feet and a depth of about 100 feet.

A large stock of all kinds of Grain is carried, Baled and Loose Hay also form part of the stock. A specialty is made of Flour that is put up for family use in bags, as well as being sold in barrels.

Employment is given to three capable men who are ever on the alert looking out for,the proprietor's interests. One double team is also kept.

Mr. Sheldon is a native of Blackwood, N. J., but become a prominent citizen of the city in the past three years that he has resided here.

C. K. MORRIS, GROCER, 
428 BROADWAY

POSSIBLY there is no better known and better liked gentleman in the neighborhood than Mr. Morris, the proprietor of the large store at 428 Broadway. Mr. Morris became the head of this house in 1886 when he succeeded Mr. A. S. Brewer, who had been there some time before selling out. 

The store proper is about 25x30 feet in dimensions and finished with all the newest and most approved fittings. The stock consists of everything that can be imagined in the line of Groceries, —all kinds of Coffees, Teas, Sugars, Flours, Spices, and the many etceteras that are in the line. Besides this there is a full stock of all kinds of Fresh Fruits and Vegetables, Butter and Egg. A specialty is made of Canned Goods and these are kept with many varieties of all the standard and well-known brands.

Mr. Morris has in his constant employ four men that are efficient and are constantly on the lookout for his interests, and one team that is employed continually.

The proprietor is at present a resident of the city.

190 

Pages 151 to 190

Pages 191 to 230


WILLIAM McGARVEY, MEATS, 
FIFTH AND PINE STREETS

THERE is scarcely a better or more favorably known 1 establishment than that conducted by Mr. McGarvey. He has been there but a short time, but has already become known, because the goods that he handles are the best and cheapest. He purchased the store from Mr. Campbell about the first of the year. This is not a new venture for him, as he was formerly located at 4th and Mt. Vernon Streets. The store occupied is 25x70 feet in dimensions and fitted very handsomely. Mr McGarvey does not depend entirely on the retail business, but does a large wholesale business, in this way he is enabled to handle large quantities and can buy and sell cheaper than those with smaller facilities. Three capable men are employed constantly.

Mr. McGarvey is a native of Philadelphia but has been one of Camden's most esteemed citizens for past five years.

191

SAMUEL KEOWN, PROVISIONS, 
122 NORTH THIRD STREET

THIS successful business is the outcome of many years of industry and hard work. The present owners succeed a no less known personage than the present Mayor of Camden (Mayor Pratt), who succeeded Mr. Willetts in 1876. The present proprietor was here nearly twenty years, and opened with James B. Boyer in 1870. The building is a one story on N. 3d street and runs back some distance. 

Mr. Keown makes it his especial care to supply his customers with the finest Meats, both Fresh and Salt, that are obtainable. His porter-house steaks are well known by all who are fond of that toothsome dish. He gives employment to three assistants, and keeps one delivery wagon constantly on the move, delivering his large orders. They have the reputation of having the first and finest Truck and Vegetables in the market.

Mr. Keown is a native of Camden, and quite a prominent member of both the Odd Fellows and Red Men.

SCUDDER & SON, DRESSED AND UNDRESSED LUMBER,
95 FEDERAL STREET

MESSRS. WILLIAM C. SCUDDER & SON, are conducting a very large and important business at No. 95 Federal Street, which is worthy of a much more extended notice than can be given it in this notice. It was established in 1867 by Scudder & Cook, and in 1874 came into the hands of Win. C. Scudder & Co. The firm was changed to William. C. Scudder & Son in 1883. It comprises a Sash and Blind Factory, Planing Mill, and Lumber Yard, and occupies about two acres, has well appointed offices, yards, etc. The main warehouse is 34x90 feet in size and is three stories high; the mill is 150x100 feet and is equipped with every modern appliance, machinery, So-horse steam-power, and employs seventy men. The annual trade amounts to 8,000,000 feet.

William C. Scudder and Reuben G. Scudder are the members of the firm, the former having been formerly a sea captain and had seventeen vessels. He is now Master Port Warden for this district, appointed by the Governorof New Jersey, and condemned Petty's Island.

Besides the lumber business these gentlemen build from 75 to 100 houses of their own every year.

192

J. DANENHOWER, GROCER, 
THIRD AND LINDEN STREETS 


THE well known store of Mr. J. Danenhower represents with great force the power of industry and thrift in carrying on a large business. He has been located here for the past thirty-five years, and put his life's best labors into the business, but he is well repaid, having built up one of the largest trades in town.

His store is about 25 feet front by 75 in depth. He carries in stock a full line of everything that goes to make a complete store of this kind—Teas, Coffees, Sugars, Canned Goods of all kinds, and all the best Fruit that the markets afford.
In the successful carrying on of his business he has three very efficient assistants and one team.

Mr. Danenhower was born in Pennsylvania, but almost might be called a Camdenite, having lived in this city for the past forty years.

193

JACOB RETTBERG, WAGON BUILDER, 
N.W. CORNER OF DELAWARE AVENUE AND MARKET STREET

THERE is no one in Camden whose name is better known in connection with the manufacture of wagons than is Mr. Jacob Rettberg. Establishing in 1864, for over a quarter of a century he has been identified with a high class of work in this important line, and has won for himself a reputation of which he has every reason to feel justly proud.

He occupies a salesroom 28x100 feet in dimensions, at the N. W. corner of Delaware avenue and Market street, where are displayed at all times the best products of modern skill in wagon building, in its every branch, except extremely light work, which is not handled at all.

Within a stone's throw of the salesroom and office, directly up Market street, at Nos. 15-17, are the spacious workrooms, 100x35 feet in dimensions, where all the goods handled are manufactured, ten competent and skilled workmen being constantly employed.

Personally, Mr. Rettberg is an extremely popular gentleman, both in social and in business circles. He is still in the prime of life, and has apparently many years of useful citizenship before him.

HUSSONG & CO., DYERS, 
6O9 AND 611 PEARL STREET

THERE are but few firms in this city that have reached as near perfection in the respective lines of trade as Messrs. Hussong & Co. The firm had its inception in 1877, and has steadily grown since then. The premises occupied are about 150x40 feet in dimensions, and are divided off into the dying room, and office. In each department the best appliances being used; steam power being in operation.

Employment is given to as many as fourteen men. during the season. Special care is used in the selection of dyestuffs, only the finest grades being used, as the yarn dyed is of the best grades. The yarn is brought here in the grey, then scoured and afterwards dyed any shade that is desired. A large quantity of stubbing is also dyed, that is the wool ready to be spun into yarn. The trade is very extensive, extending all over the Middle and Western States.

The members of the firm are Messrs. James Hussong, Henry Hussong and Frederick Hussong, all gentlemen who are fully acquainted with the many details of this, business.

194

MRS. M. COOK, DRY GOODS, NOTIONS AND TRIMMINGS,
THIRD AND ELM STREETS


IN noting the historical landmarks of commercial enterprise, the pages of this review would be incomplete without the lady whose name heads this article. Originally established in Camden nearly a quarter of a century ago, Mrs. Cook is one of the oldest and most highly respected business women in the city. Removing from her first and old stand at Broadway and Walnut, her present quarters are especially adapted for the dry goods business. The salesroom is 20x35 feet in dimensions, and the stock kept on hand consists of a fine line of Dry Goods of every description, Notions, Trimmings, Ribbons, Hosiery, Underwear, and all kinds of Furnishing Goods.

The proprietress is a lady of rare tact and business ability, regarded throughout her whole business career as a thoroughly conscientious dealer, well known in trade as well as social circles. Several competent assistants are employed to facilitate the progress of the establishment and a select trade is enjoyed.

After so long and successful a career, Mrs. Cook is about to retire from the arena of commerce, and space forbids us to eulogize at length the success and esteem that has attended an honorable and early effort in placing the City of Camden in the front ranks of commercial prosperity.

195

COLLINGS CARRIAGE CO., CARRIAGES, 
108-116 N. FRONT STREET

AMONG the oldest and best known houses in the city, the Collings Carriage Company takes a first place. This business was established by Mr. Jacob S. Collings in 1827, and passed through the various members of the family till 1887, when it was incorporated under the laws of New Jersey.

The building is about 160 x 170 feet in dimensions, and fitted with the best machinery in all details of the business. About fifty skilled workmen are constantly employed. The principal products of this firm are Buggies, Sulkies, One Man Wagons, and Buckboards, this last being made a specialty of. The firm have a patent spring, that is attached to the board in such a manner as to prevent the board from settling and obviate all foot jar. This spring accomplishes these most important features and still preserves the buckboard in its original simplicity.
These are shipped all over the country, and at present the house is very busy turning them out in great numbers.

All the many details of this business are looked after by Mr. J. Z. Collings and his son. Both gentlemen are among the most prominent and successful business men in the city.

THE REVIEW

THE REVIEW is the only Sunday paper printed in Camden, and as it is a purely local paper, the 65,000 people of the city are all more or less interested in its various departments. These cover the political, social, secret society, military, musical, club, sporting, personal and general news of Camden, much of which is not treated upon by any other paper in or out of the .city. It will, therefore, be evident that The Review must be a valuable advertising medium among Camden people.

F. F. Patterson's Sons are the publishers and the office is 123 Federal Street. It was established April 15th, 1889, and is an eight column folio, printed on excellent quality of paper and presents an artistic typographical appearance. Politically it is independent republican. The publishers are three enterprising and talented young men, Theodore N. Patterson, Frank F. Patterson, Jr., and Wolcott J. Patterson. The style of the firm is F. F. Patterson's Sons, and their father is one of the most prominent newspapermen in the State of New Jersey, having been connected with the Newark Evening Courier and the Newark .Sunday Call. He founded the Daily Courier here in 1882, the paper having previously been conducted as a weekly.

196

WILLIAM J. COOPER & COMPANY,
HARDWARE AND MILL-WORK OF EVERY DESCRIPTION
221 KAIGHN'S AVENUE

ONE of the distinctive industries of every commercial, manufacturing and agricultural center of the country, and which contributes not a little to its material prosperity, is the hardware and building material trade. The vast variety of implements, utensils and materials incidental to this line of trade are indispensable and almost illimitable. Among the houses engaged in this industry in Camden, and which have gained a wide reputation for reliable goods and honorable dealing, and worthy of deserving mention in the pages of this review, is the house this article purposes to sketch.

Mr. William J. Cooper is a native of Camden, and having acquired a thorough knowledge in this business by spending a life's career in it, he inaugurated this present enterprise in 1888, after a successful connection with the old firm of Cooper, Stone & Co.

The salesroom occupied for business purposes is 2ox 65 feet in dimensions, heavily stocked with a comprehensive line of Builders' and Shelf Hardware, Mechanics' Tools of every description, Spades, Agricultural Implements, Table and Pocket Cutlery, Contractors', Miners' and Blacksmiths' Supplies, Manufacturers' Tools, Bar, Rod and other Merchant Iron, Cast Steel, etc., Tin, Copper, Zinc and Sheet Iron Ware, Paints, Brushes, and everything in the builder's line, such as Sash, Doors, Blinds, Shutters, Window and Door Frames, etc., etc.
Extensive dealers in Coal, they are prepared to furnish fuel for family and manufacturing purposes, having facilities to fill the largest orders. The original founders of this enterprise were the first concern to deal in coal and wood in the city of Camden. Their yards are eligibly located at Front and Mechanic streets, the Philadelphia and Atlantic City Railroad having a side track running into their yard.

In the rear and side of the salesroom are three warehouses, running back 250 feet. Here is stored mill stock and every conceivable article for builders' use, as well as heavy iron and steel goods.

Six assistants are employed in the prosecution of the affairs of the business and three teams used for hauling purposes. Every facility is at hand for the prompt fulfillment of orders, and no means spared that may in any way foster the interests of the patron.

The subject of this article is a courteous and responsible business man and a public-spirited citizen, universally esteemed by all with whom he forms business relations.

197

J. H. KNERR, JEWELRY,
443 KAIGHN'S AVENUE

THE rage for personal adornment continues with us the same as it did many years ago. One great difference is that so far as the ancients were concerned they had no such an establishment as that which Mr. J. H. Knerr conducts at 443 KAIGHN'S avenue. 

About eleven years ago he started as the pioneer in that line in this section, but, seeing his success, others have started in the neighborhood. The store occupied is 25 x 60 feet in size and fitted with the most improved appliances as regards safety from thieves. Mr. Knerr has two very large burglar proof safes in which he keeps all his valuable stock, when the day's business is over. A full line of all Solid and Plated Silverware is kept on hand, as well as all kinds of Clocks, Watches and the newest designs in Jewelry. Mr. Knerr has in his employ three experts in this line.

Mr. Knerr is a native of Cumberland County, Maryland, but for some time past has been one of Camden's esteemed citizens.

198

R. W. RICHIE, M. D., DRUGGIST,
401 KAIGHN'S AVENUE

THERE is no line of business that requires a man's attention more than this. He is liable to be called up at all hours during the day and night. He has no time that can be rightly called his own; in reality he is the people's servant.

About five years ago, Dr. R. W. Richie purchased the business from the former owner, and ever since it has been one of the principal stores in this section of the city.
He has a very commodious store, on the corner of Fourth street and KAIGHN'S avenue. The stock consists of a full line of all the freshest Drugs, Patent Medicines, Perfumery, Soap and Fancy Toilet Articles. A specialty is also made of carefully filling physicians' prescriptions.

Dr. Richie has been graduated from the Jefferson Medical College, and is a registered pharmacist. He has in his employ a very capable assistant. He is a native of the Quaker City, but has almost become a full-fledged Camdenite.

FRED. FIEDLER, JR., CIGAR MANUFACTURER, 
MARKET STREET

THIS gentleman succeeded A. Mersner in the above business in 1887, and occupies a neat and attractive salesroom, 14 by 18 feet in dimensions, with a workroom of same size in rear, which is devoted to the manufacture of Fine Cigars, including the celebrated brands known as Golden Veil, Spanish Gem, etc. His output of these and other goods aggregates 10,000 monthly. Ten competent and skilled assistants are regularly employed and his goods which he sells in Gloucester and Camden counties, are highly spoken of by consumers.

Mr. Fiedler is a native of Cincinnati, and is highly popular and esteemed in the community as a gentleman of uncommon business talent.

199

200

THE POST

THE paper is issued from the new stone building erected expressly for it at Front and Federal Streets, which is one of the most capacious and convenient printing offices in the State.
The post is republican in politics as reflecting the sentiments of its projectors and present management, but was never so closely allied to party as to be destitute of a spirit of independence when necessary to exhibit it.

It has endeavored to establish a reputation, as it has the character, for reliability, circulating, as it does, among the best intelligence of the community, and keeping up with, if not leading, in the race for popular preferment.

Every year has brought increase to its prosperity, each year has added to its solidity. Known to the people for so many years, it prefers that they should judge of its performance, rather than indulge in the profuse promise and profession which too often amount to nothing else. Its office, books and accounts are open for the inspection of those who desire tangible evidence instead of printed assertions.

The first number of the post, with no heralding prospectus and but little preparation therefore, was issued October 1st, 1875, by H. I,. Bonsall & Son, Jacob C. Mayhew, W. C. Schock and Chas. Whitecar being temporarily interested in it for a short period. Although not the first daily in the city, the venture was the first to succeed and maintain continuous publication. Its proprietors believeing that there was enough local pride to sustain it, made it a two cent paper on the start, but could never reach a good circulation until they placed the price at one cent, a policy which has since been followed by other local issues. H.L. and B.L. Bonsall conducted the business for most of the fifteen years of its existence, until declining health caused the latter to relinquish it, and a company, capitalized at $30,000, was formed, of which the principals are H.L. Bonsall, president; Edward Furlong, treasurer and Joseph M. Engard, secretary.

200

G. F. HAMMOND, PLUMBER, 
THIRD STREET AND TAYLOR'S AVENUE

THE first building that would attract the attention on South Third Street is that owned and occupied by Mr. Hammond as his plumbing office. The building is old English in design, the first story built of limestone and the finishings being brick. The entrance reminds one of the old London houses built so many years ago. This building was built in 1888 for Mr. Hammond, and the only structure of the kind in the United States.

The business was started in 1875 by the present owner. The building occupied was just across the street, and finding that the business was getting too large for the store, the move was made. The property now occupied has a frontage of 35 feet on South Third Street and a depth of over a hundred with a large storage yard. 

All kinds of plumbing are done by the firm. Many of the new houses that have just been put up in the city bear evidence to the ability and skill of Mr. Hammond, he having had the contract to do the sanitary work. All kinds of jobbing is attended too in the shortest possible time. When running, normally 15 to 35 hands are constantly employed and one team.

Mr. Hammond is a native of the City of Baltimore, but has been identified with Camden's best interests since 1872. He has frequently had official honor thrust upon him by his admiring fellow-citizens, he now holding the position of President of the Board of Health and a member of the City Council.

Mr. Hammond is a member of the Order of Masons and Post 37, in this city, having been in the 33d Illinois Infantry for three years and four months.

201

JEFFRIES' SHOE STORE,
322 FEDERAL STREET

THIS long and favorably known shoe house was established here twenty-four years ago by the father of the present proprietor, William H. Jeffries, who succeeded to the business about four years since. The :size of the salesroom is 18x60 feet, and it is situated at 322 Federal Street.

The stock is large and the assortment includes everything belonging to the trade—Boots, Shoes, Slippers, and Rubbers, of the best known manufacturers, and all are sold at prices that satisfy the most economical.

A specialty is made of repairing, and another specialty is made in the sale of Burt's Goods, which are made in the same manner and of the same materials as custom work. Two assistants are employed.

Mr. Jeffries was born at Salem, in this State, and has been all his life a shoe dealer.

MRS. A. TODD, MILLINERY, 
815 S. FIFTH STREET

ONE of the oldest and best known stores in the city is that of Mrs. A. Todd, it having been established by the present proprietress a score of years ago, and has continued in prosperity since the beginning. 

The store is large and handsomely fitted, covering an area of 20x40 feet in dimensions.
Here is to be found one of the largest and most varied lines in the city. Embracing all the newest novelties and Parisian importations. All kinds of trimmed and untrimmed hats are sold :as well as the flowers, ribbons, velvets, etc., with which to trim them. A specialty is made of trimming hats and bonnets to order in which department an endless amount of taste is displayed. Three capable and experienced assistants are employed.

Mrs. Todd has always been a resident of the city. 

202

JOHN LECROY, FLAVORING EXTRACTS

ONE of the most prominent houses in this line is that of Mr. John Lecroy. This business has been established many years. It started about eighteen years ago in a much smaller place, and moved here about nine years ago. The salesroom is about 18x35 feet in dimensions, and several workrooms are also used.

The product of this concern is well known all over this and the adjoining counties, all kinds of Proprietary Medicines, Flavoring Extracts and Perfumery being turned out. In the store is also to be found a full line of Confectionery and Stationery. Seven capable assistants are employed, and five wagons are used in the delivery department.

Mr. Lecroy has always been a prominent resident of the city. He enlisted in Co. H, 2d N. J. Vols., and received an honorable discharge in 1865, after having seen a large part of the war.

MORGAN PRINTING HOUSE, 
120 ARCH STREET

EVER since the invention of movable type by Mr. Gutenberg, the printing business has been on the steady increase. Among the best and most favorably known in this city may be mentioned Mr. Edwin Morgan. This gentleman started business about fifteen years ago, and about two years ago he built the structure now occupied. It is two stories and about 18x50 feet hi dimensions. Book and Job Printing of all kinds is done. Employment is given to as many as ten capable men during the busy season.

Mr. Morgan is a thoroughly experienced man, having learned his trade with Messrs. J. B. Lippincott & Co. and Craig, Finley & Rowley, both of Philadelphia. He is a native of Camden.

203

W. H. WILKINS & CO., LUMBER & MILL WORK, 
513, 515 & 517 CHERRY STREET

AMONG the many houses in this line, none have been more successful than W. H. Wilkins & Co. These gentlemen opened here about five years ago, and have met with the greatest possible success.

One large mill is occupied, about 80x100 feet in dimensions ; two floors are occupied. A large storage lot, 80x100 feet, is also used.

All the newest and most approved machinery is in use here, and all kinds of mill work can be turned out, Sashes, Doors, Blinds, Mouldings, etc., being some of the productions. A specialty is the Flonda Moulding ; while fully equal in appearance and durability to the usual mouldings, it can be produced at about half the expense. When running normally, forty skilled workmen are employed, and three teams are kept continually busy.

The individual members of the firm are W. H. Wilkins and his son, Frederick Wilkins. Both of these gentlemen are practical in this line, and esteemed residents of the city.

204

THE CAMDEN COURIER, (Daily and Weekly)

IS the leading Republican newspaper in the city, and enjoys the distinction of being the most largely circulated paper published in West Jersey. Established in 1882, its course has been one of continued prosperity, as its management has ever had in view the moral and material welfare of the people. While staunchly Republican in its political principles, it is not an organ, but is free at all times to denounce what is conceived to be impolitic or calculated to do public injury. It is the only daily paper published in Camden which gives the news by telegraph, having its own exclusive wire, which is connected with those of the United Press to every important news center of the United States and Continental Europe. The rapid growth of the circulation of the Courier necessitated this year the introduction of a Scott-Webb-perfecting press, with a capacity of 20,000 copies per hour, as well a? other facilities to meet the demands of its growing constituency. When the present and prospective improvements to the Courier plant are finished, it will be the most complete newspaper establishment in South or West Jersey.

Its admittedly large circulation has established its reputation as one of the very best mediums for advertising in New Jersey. 

STRATTON & IVINS, CIGARS, Etc., 
BROADWAY AND SPRUCE STREETS 

PROBABLY there is no place in Camden where lovers of a good cigar congregate than at the establishment of Messrs. Stratton & Ivins, at the corner of Broadway and Spruce streets.
The business has been established about a year, and with what success may be seen upon looking at the well-filled shelves and cases. All brands of the best known makers are handled, as well as those of their own manufacture.

A full line of all Smoking and Chewing Tobaccos are kept, as well as all Smokers' Articles, such as Pipes, Cigar and Cigarette Holders, Match Safes, etc.

The individual members of the firm are Joseph T. Stratton and Charles Ivins, both industrious and well-known residents of the city.

They are both prominently connected with the Red Men. Mr. Stratton is also connected with the I. O. M. and the One Year Mutual Benefit Society.

205

CHARLES W. LARGE, CANDY MANUFACTURER, 
436 KAIGHN'S AVENUE.

THE most prominent concern of this nature in this city is that of Mr. Charles W. Large. This business was opened here about five years ago and has met with the most flattering success. He formerly had a store of this kind in Philadelphia but has given it up.

The building is about 25x70 feet with the store in front and the manufactory occupying the upper floors, together with a factory in the rear. All kinds of Candies are turned out, specialties being made of all kinds of Plain and Fine Confectionery, but the most specialty is in the manufacturing of what is known as Penny Goods, in Toys carrying the biggest line of the articles of my manufacture in this city. This is the largest candy manufactory in Camden. A large wholesale business is carried on together with the retail department. The trade lies all over the city and neighboring towns. Eight capable assistants are constantly employed and two teams are used to deliver the large orders.

Mr. Large is a native of Ohio but has become prominently identified with the city's best interest, having come here over five years ago.

SPENCER & VAN HART, TRIMMINGS & NOTIONS, 
BROADWAY & LINE STREETS 

THERE is, perhaps, no more widely known store in the city than that conducted by the above firm. The business was established under the same title which it now carries so well, about four years ago.

The store occupied is about 25x30 feet in dimensions and is furnished in the neatest possible manner. Two large bulk windows are constantly full of the many bargains offered.
Full lines of all Dry Goods may be found here, as well as full lines of Underwear, Hosiery, Notions, Trimmings, Perfumery, and a special department for Men's Furnishing Goods, in which may be found the newest and most attractive styles.

The individual members of the firm are Miss L.V. Spencer and Miss L. Van Hart, two very estimable ladies that are very widely known as conducting one of the best stores in the city.

206

J. A. YOUNG & CO., MARBLE AND GRANITE WORKS, 
HADDON AVENUE AND MICKLE STREET

AMONG the many enterprises now opening in this section, none give promise of more success than that of Messrs. J. A. Young & Co. These gentlemen opened a yard here in February, having transferred the business from Moorestown, N. J., where it had been established about two years. The yard is large, the dimensions are about 150 feet square.
All kinds of Granite and Marble Work, both Monumental and Building, is done in the most prompt manner and at the very lowest figures. Estimates are cheerfully furnished.
The business here employs four skilled workmen constantly and sometimes many more extra hands.

The members of the firm are Mr. Youug and a silent partner. Mr. Young resides in Moorestown, where they are well known socially, politically and commercially.

MISS BELLE LOUGHEAD, TRIMMINGS, 
1122 BROADWAY

AMONG the many stores that have opened in this section, none have been more successful than that of Miss Belle Loughead. This lady is very practical and skillful with the needle. The store was established by herself about two years ago.

The store proper is about 20x30 feet in dimensions, and fitted in the most approved style.
Here may be found all grades of Hosiery, Underwear, Fancy Goods, Notions, and Embroidery Materials. A specialty is made of making dresses to order, and among many of the best people in the city are to be seen some of this lady's exquisite workmanship.
Embroidering is also done on special order; special designs are gotten up. Two skilled people are employed.

Miss Loughead is a native of Philadelphia, but has been a well liked resident of the city for the past twenty years.

207

HENRY DAVIS, GROCER,
1704 BROADWAY

ONE of the oldest and best known Grocery and Provision houses in this section is that of Mr. Henry Davis. This gentleman established business here about twenty-seven years ago, and has since met with all the success possible.

The store is about 30x25 feet in dimensions and fitted in the best manner. Here may be found a large and varied stock of all kinds of Teas, Coffees, Spices, Canned Goods and all the many small things in this line. Two assistants are constantly employed.

Mr. Davis has been a resident of this section for nearly half a century. He is well known politically and commercially. He formerly held the position of Fire Commissioner; was Freeholder for two terms in Newton Township before it became a part of Camden; was first School Director in this end of township, Assessor, Township Committee at the time this ward was annexed to Camden; is one of the largest property owners in this section of the town; does a large business, and is a specially polite man in all his acts.

When he first came here the place was a wilderness, only about five houses from the river to the cemetery.

208

FRANK MESTER, IMPORTER AND WHOLESALE LIQUOR DEALER,
4th AND ARCH STREETS.

THIS is one of the most widely known houses in the town, it having had an established reputation for the sale of unadulterated wines and liquors. The business was established may years ago by Mr. George Ooetz, who successfully ran the business until 1877, when the present proprietor purchased his interest and has conducted it ever since.

The store occupied is 50x75 feet in dimensions and fitted in the handsomest manner possible.
All Fine liquors are sold. All kinds of Champaignes, Sherrys, Ports, Red and White German Wine are sold. All the many grades of Whiskies, Gins and Rums as well as all kinds of Bottled liquors and Cordials are handled. Three capable and genial assistants are employed.

Mr. Mester is a native of Germany, but has been one of our townsmen for the past 20 years. He is prominently connected with the various societies in the city.
Mr. Mester does all his own importing, being the only dealer in such of German Wines.

209

AUGUST HILLIER, BAKER, 
427 KAIGHN'S AVENUE

PERHAPS there is not a better or more favorably known, establishment of this character in town than that of Mr. Hillier, who has been in this business a number of years at the same place that he now occupies. 

The store itself has an area of about 20x75 feet with the work-rooms in the rear. A dining-room with a seating capacity of possibly 50 is also much used in the summer season.
Mr. Hillier's specialty is fine goods, all sorts of fine fancy cakes, and made as well as the cheaper ones in great variety. A manufactory of ice cream is also carried on, the product of which is sold at wholesale as well as retail the capacity of which is about 600 quarts a week when running at the busiest time of the year. Mr. Hillier has in his employ six practical men who know the business as thoroughly as it is possible to know. One team is kept moving at a very lively gait to get the outside customers orders and deliver them.

Mr. Hillier is a native of Philadelphia but has been identified with the city so long that he has become also the same as a native.

SHIVERS & MOFFETT, LUMBER, 
DELAWARE AVENUE

NO review of Camden's industries would do the city's commercial activity justice were it to fail to call attention to the importance of the lumber industry in our midst. Among the representative houses in this department is that of Shivers & Moffett which this well-known firm established in 1885. They occupy a neatly arranged office, adjoining which is an enormous yard of 120x300 feet in dimensions half stocked with general builders' lumber of the most approved stock excellence.

The business done is a large one and is constantly developing in consequence of the energy and aim which is put into it by its enterprising owners, who employ seven assistants in the transaction of business.

Mr. Shivers is a native of Camden County and Mr. Moffett of Philadelphia. The latter gentleman has been one of our city councilmen. Both are wide-awake and pushing merchants whose success is richly merited.

210

GEORGE J. SWOPE, CARRIAGE BUILDER
FEDERAL AND STATE STREETS

AMONG the industries of Camden, Carriage Building is without a doubt one of the most prominent. Mr. George J. Swope recognizing this fact has opened a large and commodious factory. The building is about 60x20 feet in dimensions. Carriage and Wagon building is carried on in all its phases, a specialty being made of repairing fine carriages. The business gives employment to three skilled workmen.

Mr. Swope has always been in this line and is a highly practical and skillful workman; he formerly had a factory of the same kind in Philadelphia. He is an active member of the Knights of Birmingham, a part of Masonic Order, and the Knights of Pythias.

CAMDEN DAILY TELEGRAM
121 FEDERAL STREET

PROGRESSIVE journalism is certainly shown by those having in charge the above mentioned paper. Published as it is, by the Telegram Publishing Co., it shows that in matters of local note, it compares very favorably with much larger papers of Philadelphia and sister cities. The paper was established six years ago, Independent Republican in tone and yet fearless in its attacks on jobbery, bossism or fraud if found in any political party, it has the esteem and regard of its many readers.

The type is clear and clean, great care being taken that no typographical errors are made ; a fact of itself being a commendable one.

Coming out every afternoon in the week but Sunday, it has somewhat of an advantage in the way of reproducing the morning events for its reader's delectation. Its editorials are generally brilliant but concise and always to the point.

The stockholders are J. C. Hamilton, W. Scott Albertson and Upton S. Jefferys. 

The paper is a six column folio, purely local in character and presents an exceedingly neat appearance. Twenty-five people are constantly employed, .ranging from the editor in chief to apprentice boy.

We cannot close this too brief review without predicting the Telegram still more success in the future as those having it in charge are fully alive to the interests of a first-class journal.

211


CAMDEN MORNING NEWS BUILDING.

212

CAMDEN MORNING NEWS

THE beginning of the Camden Morning News, like that of the oak, was small, but its future promises great things, it being destined to become one of the leading dailies of New Jersey, being the only morning newspaper published between Trenton and the sea.

The paper was first started as a weekly, on November 17, 1888, at Fourth and Kaighn avenue, by James M. Fitzgerald and Edward Watson. It then bore the suggestive name of Fads, and being an aggressive and progressive sheet, fairly bristled with them, every line glistening with the force and wit of its editor, Mr. Fitzgerald.

At that time the type was set and the paper printed at the Keighton Printing House, 607 Sansom street, Philadelphia. After struggling along for a few weeks, Mr. William H. Getty was induced to put some money into the enterprise, and from that time on the paper began to boom and be a power in the city. It was formed into a stock company, called the "Facts Publishing Company", with a paid up capital of $5,000, divided into 1,000 shares, and ran as a weekly paper until March 13, 1889. In the meantime, or on March 8, 1889, the old Campbell press, on which the successful Daily Courier had been started, was purchased from Mr. Theodore N. Patterson. A boiler and engine were also bought, together with new type and other material, and when the daily edition was started the paper had a very complete plant.
The title of the paper was made the Morning News at this time, and afterwards changed to the camden morning news. The daily edition succeeded from the start, until its quarters 

at Fourth and Kaighn avenue grew too small, and on December 15, 1889, the plant was removed to the handsome building at 125 Federal street, erected by F. F. Patterson especially for newspaper purposes, where the paper is published at present.

The movement was a good one and helped the paper wonderfully, placing it on an equal footing with its contemporaries at once. During the winter and spring the entire force was reorganized and the paper made one of the brightest in the State. The circulation and business increased rapidly, and on May 4, 1890, a new Bullock press and a complete stereotyping plant were purchased, being the only ones in the State south of Newark. These improved facilities added increased prosperity, the main credit for which Mr. Getty deserves.

On July 14, 1890, Mr. Fitzgerald sold out his interest in the news to Mr. Getty, and the latter gentleman the following day had the title of the company changed from the ''Facts Publishing Company'' to the ''News Company." He immediately organized a new stock company, with a capital of $20,000, divided into 4,000 shares, nearly all of which he owns.

The officers of the present company are Richard S. Ridgway, President; Thomas Hall, Secretary ; William H. Getty, Treasurer. These gentlemen are also the Directors.

213

M. B. WEST, DRY GOODS AND NOTIONS, 
HOLL'S BLOCK, BROADWAY

WITH that keen discernment which has always characterized her business vision, the accomplished lady whose name heads this article, has been among the first to realize the advantage of locating in the commodious and luxurious quarters in what is known as "Holl's Block." An extremely nice stock of goods is carried, including Dry Goods, Ribbons, Trimmings, Silks, etc. The proprietress is a native of New Jersey and was formerly located at 517 Market street.

214 & 215

THE NATIONAL STATE BANK OF CAMDEN
SECOND & MARKET STREETS 

A REVIEW of the manufacturing and commercial interests of Camden would be very defective without some account of the leading banks, the supporters and arbiters of trade transactions. The oldest and one of the most solid of the fiscal corporations of the city is the National State Bank, which is equally notable for its age—having been chartered originally as long ago as 1812—and for the careful reliability of its management and its consequent uninterrupted prosperity and success. It was created under the Act of the Legislature of New Jersey of January, 1812, authorizing the establishing of State Banks at Trenton, Camden, and other places, in February of that year, and commenced business on June 16, the first President being William Russell, and the first Cashier Richard M. Cooper, the names of members of the Cooper family and of most of the prominent Camden families having always been found on its list of officers from its inception. A copy of the original advertisement of the Bank, taken from a newspaper of those days, and giving directors' or discount days, with a form for notes, and also publishing the arrangements for applications for discount in Philadelphia, still hangs in the private office of the Banking House.

In 1829 the Legislature extended the old act of incorporation until 1852, and in 1849 another act gave a further extension for twenty years after the expiration of the then existing charter. When the system of National Banks was inaugurated, it merged its character of a State Bank in that of a National one, and on June 2, 1865, became the National State Bank of Camden, John Gill being President, and Jesse Townsend, Cashier.

A general banking business is transacted, embracing all the usual details of deposits, loans, discounts and collections, the latter department being a specialty of this bank, which collects through its correspondents-in all the chief cities, especially in Philadelphia and New York, the Girard Bank acting as its agent in the former city, and the Importers' and Traders' and the Ninth National in the latter. The discount days are Tuesday and Friday at 10 o'clock A. M. The capital is $260,000, with a surplus of an equal amount.

The volume of business is very large, as might be expected in a corporation of such high standing and with such a long and unimpeachable record ; and notwithstanding the competition of more recently established corporations, is continually increasing, this Bank, it is safe to say, is doing a larger business than any south of Trenton, which fact is not only gratifying to its patrons, but an eminent proof 'of its uniformly conservative and careful, while yet energetic management. The Bank is noted in financial circles for the value of its stock, having always been a large dividend paying institution, which important element adds greatly to its impregnable character.

The bank building is a commodious and substantial one, and was enlarged and improved in 1875. It stands on the original site, at the N. W. corner of Second and Market streets, in the center of the business part of the city. For the convenience of Philadelphia patrons the Bank has an office at 223 Market street in Philadelphia.

The officers are : President, Mr. Heulings Lippincott; Cashier, Mr. Wilbur F. Rose ; and Directors, Messrs. Israel W. Heulings, Thomas W. Davis, Joshua W. Lippincott, Benjamin F. Archer, John S. Bispham, Emmor Roberts, William Watson, Edward Dudley, John Gill, John T. Bottomley, Calvin S. Crowell, and G. Genge Browning.

216

HARRIS GRAFFEN, REAL ESTATE, 
312 MARKET STREET

THE development of the real estate interests of this city has resulted in no small degree from the energy and enterprise of our leading brokers, and prominent among the number is Mr. Harris Graffen. The house was one of the oldest and most responsible of Philadelphia, having been established there more than two score years ago and enjoyed a reputation for reliability second to none.

Mr. Graffen came to this city some six months ago to establish a branch office in connection with his Philadelphia office, in Brown Brothers building Fourth and Chestnut streets. Since that time, however, Mr. Graffen's business in this city has grown to such proportions, that he has made his Camden office the main office, and his Philadelphia office is conducted by his assistants, under his direction.

Mr. Graffen conducts a general real estate business, giving special attention to the sale of unimproved, suburban, sea-side and country properties. Mr. Graffen is regarded as a reliable authority upon present and prospective values, and both buyers and sellers will find his long experience and superior judgment of much importance in the conduct of real estate transactions.

Mr. Graffen is sole sales agent for the well known Sharon Hills Land Association, and for "Audubon," a new suburb on the line of the Reading Route to the Sea, and parties, desiring to purchase eligible building sites will do well to call at his well appointed and centrally located office.

In recognition of his administrative and executive ability, the Board of Trade of this city some six months ago solicited Mr. Graffen to become its Secretary. The Board of Trade recognizing their need of a wide-awake, broad-guage business man to manage their affairs prevailed upon Mr. Graffen to act as their executive officer, and the wisdom of their selection has been demonstrated by the energy and life that now characterizes the Board. Thirty members were added in less than two months, and a stir has been made in every department of business in which the Board might naturally be expected ,to influence. Mr. Graffen is popular and respected in business circles, and his policy and methods is a thorough-going exponent of the great cardinal principles of equity and probity, which form the only basis of enduring prosperity.

217 

GEORGE A. MUNGER & BRO., WHOLESALE LUMBER,
11 DELAWARE AVENUE

A prominent feature of Camden's business is its lumber yards, and in a review of its industrial resources space must be given to the spacious place of George A. Munger & Bro., which is 100x600 feet in dimensions and which gives employment to 20 workmen all the year round.
The business here was established by the present firm in 1883 for the purpose of introducing into the Northern and Middle States the celebrated North Carolina Pine Wood which they handle exclusively, having it all shipped here from Beaufort, North Carolina.

The special property which tends to make the wood so popular is its remarkable durability and most intelligent builders give it the preference over all others for floorings and wainscoatings.

Mr. George Munger personally looks after the business here, his brother Chauncey W. Munger, looking after the destines of the Carolina end of the enterprise.

Mr. George Munger is a native of New York and is Highly esteemed in the community, being a member of the Republican Club. He is also interested in the firm of J. B. Van Sciver & Co., and is regarded as one of our most substantial and conservative business men.

218


HENRY S. HARROP

HARROP & EVANS,
DEALERS IN BUTTER, EGGS, CHEESE AND GENERAL COUNTRY PRODUCE,
331 KAIGHN'S AVENUE

AMONG the largest and most responsible dealers in southern Camden in this line of goods is the gentlemen whose names lead this article. Originally established by Harrop & Bro., in 1888, it came into possession of Henry S. Harrop in May, 1890; the present proprietors succeeded this firm in May, 1890.

From its first inception this house has proven a convenience to the trade and public in general. The salesroom proper is 18x36 feet in dimensions, stocked with the best products of the market. Butter, Cheese and Eggs are the specialties run, but no lack of attention is given to a general line of Country Produce. At the present time they are running some 500 pounds of Butter a week, Harrop & Evans having the agency of the Standard Butter Company, of Oswego, N. Y., whose "Gilt Edge" Creamery Butter is too well known fo purity and general excellence to require any elucidation from the pen of the writer.

Mr. Hugh Harrop, a brother of one of the proprietors, located in the agricultural districts of Iowa, devotes especial attention to supplying the eastern agency with the products of his farm, and fresh consignments are daily received and supplied to a select and steadier increasing patronage.

Several assistants are employed and a team utilized to facilitate the progress of the establishment. Prior to engaging in his present mercantile pursuit, Mr. Harrop was engaged in the wool department of John & James Dobson, carpet manufacturers, as receiving clerk, and since establishing here he has readily sprang into popular favor as a young and enterprising business man, sustaining a reputable position in the business world as a reliable dealer; he is a Red Man and Odd Fellow.

Mr. Albert J. Evans is a native of Virginia and has been engaged in his present line of business for the past five years in Philadelphia, is a member of the order of Red Men, and is highly esteemed in both business and social circles.

219

SINNICKSON CHEW, PRINTER AND STATIONERY, 
N. E. CORNER OF FRONT AND MARKET STREETS 

ONE of the oldest and most favorably known houses of this kind in the city is that of Mr. Sinnickson Chew. This gentleman succeeded the late Samuel C. Harbert in 1862, and has managed the business successfully since its inception.

The store is about 20x30 feet in dimensions,, and the printing room up stairs occupy the third floor which is 50x90 feet. Three cylinder and three job presses are kept busy. The printing business done is without exception the largest in the city; a newspaper is printed here, the well known West Jersey Press. Special attention is also paid to catalogue and job' work, which is done in the shortest possible time.

A fine stock of Stationery, Blank Books, Paper, Pens and Fancy Articles are also kept. Twenty-five skilled workmen are employed when running normally.

Mr. Chew is a native of Salem County, New Jersey, he has been a prominent resident of the city for many years, and always to be found among the men who are looking towards Camden's best interests.

220

KELLYS' MERCHANT TAILORING, 
304 MARKET STREET.

THIS firm consists of Mr. Kelly, Sr., and his five sons. Their main place of business is located at 142 and 144 N. Ninth street, Philadelphia, and they opened their first Camden branch in 1889 at 214 Market street, and removed to their present handsome and commodious quarters recently. A fine stock of Imported and Domestic Fabrics for Men's Wear is always kept in stock, and the very best skilled labor is used in every department, from 80 to 100 people being employed by this house.

JOSEPH CAMPBELL & CO., 
PACKERS OF BEEFSTEAK TOMATOES, JELLIES, &c.

AN industry which is almost an institution in Camden is the packing of fruits and vegetables, and preserves of various kinds, and the representative house in this line is that of Messrs. Joseph Campbell & Co., whose factory is located on Second Street. The firm was commenced by Mr. Campbell in 1876 on its present basis, he having however for several years previously been engaged in this business in Camden. The existing style of the firm was adopted in 1882.

The establishment is the largest of the kind in this section, and one of the largest in the country. The factory building is a substantial three-story brick structure, extending through from 2d to Front street, the number of employees being 100.

The line of production is very comprehensive, embracing broadly almost all the fruits and vegetables which can be preserved for household use. The chief specialties are the well-known "Beefsteak Tomatoes" and "Extra Fine French Peas," which two articles have become standard goods. They are specially grown for this house, and the manufacture is carried through entirely by hand, thus securing a more perfect article and greatly avoiding breakage. The goods are canned cold and afterwards cooked in the cans, by which means all the delicate natural flavor is retained. The "French Peas" are canned exactly in the natural state, and are not colored, and none of the goods are carried over from season to season. The goods comprise tomatoes, jellies, preserves, fruit butters, peas, mince meat, etc, which are packed in tin, glass, wood and stone, the market embracing the whole United States. They have been frequently exhibited and have gained many diplomas, especially the one for Ketchup, secured at the "Pure Food Exposition" in 1888, which was the only one then given for this article.

The members of the firm are Mr. Joseph Campbell, Mr. Arthur Dorrance, Mr. Walter S. Spackman and Mr. Joseph Campbell, all of whom are leading business men.

221

CHAS. S. CAFFREY CO., CARRIAGES.

CHARLES S. CAFFREY CO., of Camden, N. J., the well-known carriage builders, was founded in 1853 by Mr. Charles S. Caffrey, president of the company, which was incorporated 1879 to increase the facilities required by the extension of the trade into-the several parts of Europe and South America, as well as every State in the Union.

This establishment is famous for light trotting traps, sulkies and skeleton wagons. The Caffrey wagon for road driving is sought after by all appreciating comfort and ease in speedy driving.
The coaches, broughams, victorias, rockaways, phaetons and carriages of every description for town and country use are of original and distinctive designs, substantial and light construction, sumptuous linings and elegant finish.

To produce this work requires skilled artisans of the highest order, and closest attention to the selecting and curing of materials. The Camden building comprises about six acres of floor space, in which are employed 150 hands, turning out from 500 to 600 vehicles annually. This, in conjunction with the warehouse and salesroom, at 1712-14 Chestnut street, Philadelphia, in a six-story building, 45x150 feet, where the repairing department is located, makes as complete a carriage building establishment of the size as any in the country. Every vehicle with the name of "Caffrey" upon it is built in its entirety from exclusive patterns of each part designed within the establishment. 

222

223

HOWLAND CROFT, SONS & CO., LINDEN WORSTED MILLS, 
BROADWAY AND JEFFERSON AVENUE

AMONG the worsted and woolen mills of Camden a conspicuous building is that belonging to Messrs. Howland Croft, Sons & Co., formerly Croft & Priestley, known as the Linden Worsted Mills, now located at Broadway and Jefferson avenue. The factory was established in 1880, under the present style, at the corner of Front and Linden streets, whence its name. It was a successful institution from the commencement, and remained at the old location until 1885, when the fine new building now occupied was erected on ground purchased for the purpose. The area of the ground occupied is 200 by 415 feet, and the buildings—all of brick and four stories in height—consist of three separate structures, each one being devote.! to its own special department. They are: the mill proper, of the extent of 50 by 240 feet; the wool warehouse, of 100 by 40 feet, and the offices and storerooms, of the size of 80 by 30 feet. The force of hands is 400.

The goods manufactured are worsted and woolen yarns in all the various grades and colors, and the brands of their goods enjoy a high reputation in the market.

The members of the firm at first were Howland Croft and Herbert Priestley. In November, 1886, Mr. Priestley died, and thence until March 1, 1889, the management devolved upon Mr. Croft. At the latter date the three sons of Mr. Croft were joined with him in partnership, and the firm style became Howland Croft, Sons & Co. The names of the junior members are Mr. John William Croft, Mr. George Howland Croft and Mr. Samuel Granger Croft.

The handsome engravings accompanying this too brief sketch of what is undoubtedly the leading commercial undertaking of South Camden, consist of a reproduction of the spacious buildings and of a portrait of Mr. Howland Croft. A journey through the numerous apartments of the mills shows that not only is the machinery and all appointments of the concern of the latest and most approved character that modern ingenuity and skill, backed by the most ample capital, could attain and operated by a colossal engine, whose mammoth proportions excite the wonder and amazement of all observers, and seems by its magnitude to rival the glories of the celebrated Corliss engine at the Centennial Exposition at Philadelphia; but its sanitary condition is carefully looked after, and a more contented and happier set of work-people is seldom seen in a large industrial enterprise.

The story of Mr. Croft's life would be more readable than a romance, illustrating as it does the immense possibilities which the present age holds in trust for men of energy, pluck, perseverance and tried integrity, upon whom it heaps its richest rewards and crowns with its loftiest esteem. From the present summit of his well-won success, Mr. Croft cannot fail to contemplate, with feelings of the most entire satisfaction, the roadway over which he has journeyed and which is strewn with the conquests of laudable ambition over all difficulties. Personally one of the most genial and courteous of men, his simple and unostentatious habits of life have never been perverted by his great wealth and influence, and this fact tends to endear him to all with whom he is brought in contact, both in a business sense and socially.
After earnest solicitation, he has consented to act as Vice-President of the Board of Trade of the City of Camden, and by his presence in that body will add to its dignity and the force of its membership, being a practical man whose executive ability has never been questioned, while his enthusiastic endorsement of every movement looking to the City of Camden's interest is widely appreciated.

224

THE AMERICAN DREDGING COMPANY, 
FOOT OF SPRUCE STREET

THIS company was incorporated in Pennsylvania in 1867, to conduct the business of dredging rivers and harbors, and the filling in of low-lying land, and also for the building of all kinds of dredging machinery. The business is a most extensive one, and is carried on in all sections of the country, especially on the coast line from New York to Mobile.

The company is continually under contract for dredging, &c., with the U. S. Government, and for a vast number of corporations, as well as for private individuals. The company's building and wharf at the foot of Spruce street, in Camden, is their main establishment and comprises several departments, such as machine-shop, blacksmith-shop, carpenter and painting shops, etc., where a large force is employed building and repairing the heavy machinery used. The works cover a space of about three acres, and about forty acres of the adjoining land is also the property of the company. The officers are: President, Mr. Isaac Albertson, and Secretary, Mr. Floyd H. White. The office is at 3d and Walnut streets, Philadelphia.

225

SHIMER & BOYER, WOOLEN YARN, &c., 
POINT AND PEARL STREETS 

THE firm of Messrs. Shimer & Boyer was established in Camden at its present location at Point and Pearl streets, in 1872, being in fact a continuation of the business originated by the senior member of the firm, Mr. George Shimer, at Shimerville, in Northampton County, Pennsylvania, near Bethlehem, in 1837, which was successfully continued by him there until his removal to this city in 1872. The goods produced at Shimerville were woolen goods generally, including most of the usual varieties, but on removal to Camden the line of manufacture was confined exclusively to fancy and worsted woolen yarns, used for hosiery and for ornamental household goods, etc. The annual output amounts to 160,000 pounds of woolen, and 100,000 pounds of worsted spun yarn, which is sold to the jobbing trade in Philadelphia, and in many points in the Eastern and Western States. The factory building is of the dimensions of 150 by 50 feet, and the machinery employed consists of two sets of 48-inch carding machines, and four mules, a force of 40 operatives being employed. The firm does not dye the yarn, but employs reliable dyers, from whom, after this process is completed, it is brought back to the mill, where it is packed and forwarded to the salesrooms and office in Philadelphia, at No. 9 Bank street, whence it is shipped to various parts of the country. The members are Mr. George Shimer and Mr. P. F. Boyer, the latter gentleman attending to the shipping, Selling and financial department, while the senior member superintends the production at the factory. Both gentlemen stand in the front ranks in manufacturing and mercantile circles in Camden and Philadelphia.

226 & 227

FARR & BAILEY MANUFACTURING COMPANY

AMONG the industries most prominent at the present time in Camden is that of the manufacture of floor oil cloth, four factories being devoted to its production. Of these, the largest is that of the Farr & Bailey Manufacturing Company, situate at Seventh and Kaighn Avenue, on the line of the West Jersey Railroad Company.

The present extensive development of this business is the result of changes running back to 1875, when the business was carried on in a small way by Robert English & Brother. In that year the plant, consisting of four buildings, was purchased by Moses Bailey and Lincoln D. Farr, both of whom had previously engaged in the same business in the State of Maine, and the business carried on until 1883, under the name of L.D. Farr, Mr. Bailey being a silent partner.

In December of 1882 a disastrous fire occurred, destroying a large printing house and other buildings, and while engaged with the men and the Fire Department in checking the progress of the flames, Mr. Farr contracted a heavy and severe cold, resulting in his death a few weeks afterwards.

From January, 1883, until December, 1884, the business was carried on under the name of the estate of L.D. Farr, Mr. Samuel T. Bailey, who had been the New York representative for several years, and Mr. Edward L. Farr, son of the deceased, becoming managers. During these years the business had steadily increased, new buildings and other requisites being added to the plant as fast as needed.

In August, 1884, the business suffered from another disastrous fire, which destroyed two of the largest departments.

In December of 1884, the estate of L.D. Farr having been settled, the firm of Farr & Bailey succeeded to the business, the firm consisting of Samuel T. Bailey, Edward L. Farr, Hannah J. Bailey and Hannah B. Farr.

The present company, incorporated January 25, 1889, is the consolidation of those already interested with the exception of Hannah J. Bailey and George L. Bailey, the authorized capital of the company being $200,000.

The plant during the years mentioned has grown to large proportions, from four buildings used by English & Brother to over twenty in present use, occupying a tract of land 400 by 700 feet. Of these buildings seven are of brick and the remainder of wood. Six of the principal buildings vary between 40 to 50 feet wide by 130 to 150 feet long, being required in the process of coating, printing and varnishing. All necessary appliances have been introduced, until today the works are recognized as complete as any in the country.

To furnish the necessary power for driving the machinery and drying the goods, four large boilers, aggregating 300 horse power, and five engines, aggregating 125 horse power, are required, these consuming about i,800 tons of coal annually.

The hazardous nature of the business, owing to the combustible nature of the materials used, such as burlap, linseed oil, benzene, etc., necessitate the greatest care and watchfulness at all times. The buildings are kept scrupulously clean, each building being provided with a full equipment of ladders, fire axes, hose, water and sand buckets, and hand grenades. In addition, the men are organized into a fire company, with a hose carriage carrying 350 feet of hose always connected with a double plug in center of the grounds, supplied from a 4-inch main connected with the city pipe. This brigade is drilled every week, and has already rendered valuable aid in cases of fire occurring in proximity to the works.

When running normally, employment is given to about one hundred and forty men, the wages' paid to the same aggregating $80,000 per year.

The general supervision of the business is under the care of Mr. Samuel T. Bailey, President of the Company, the purchases and finances being looked after by Mr. Edward L- Purr, Secretary and Treasurer; the office and book-keeping department being in charge of Mr. William M. Callinghan. Mr. George 1,. Bailey is General Superintendent, and Mr. Manly A. Gilbert is Superintendent of the printing department.

The production of floor oil cloth has been steadily increasing, the output forthe year 1888 being 1,800,000 square yards, or an average of 35,000 yards per week. All the business of the company is conducted at the main office in Camden. The goods are equal to any in the market, and are sold exclusively through jobbing houses east of the Rocky Mountains and in Canada.

228

THE NEW JERSEY CHEMICAL COMPANY

AMONG the oldest and most favorably known of Camden's industries is the New Jersey Chemical Co., occupying three and one-half acres of ground on Cooper's Creek and Line street.

Potts and Kletts, the founders of the industry, were pioneers in the manufacture of fertilizers in this country. 

The manufacturing department is under the personal management of Mr. William K. Lafferty, of Cooper street, long and favorably known among Camden's business men and citizens, and whose character for integrity is reflected in the quality of the goods produced.

The factory has a present capacity of 8000 tons, with facilities for indefinite extension.
The business management of the company is under the direction of its president, Mr. Thomas B. Wattson, of the old Philadelphia shipping house of Thomas Wattson & Sons.
The office of the company is at 129 South Front street, Philadelphia.

229

THE ESTERBROOK STEEL PEN MANUFACTURING COMPANY, 
COOPER STREET.

AMONG its several other, notable manufacturing establishments, the city of Camden possesses the oldest, largest, and also the first successful steel pen manufactory in this country. The Esterbrook Steel Pen Factory was commenced in 1860 on the present site, by the President of the present Company, Mr. Richard Esterbrook, and his son, who came from England and at once started this industry. The original factory was but small, and produced but ten different kinds of pens, while today the company turn out some 400 varieties, which have a standard reputation, and are sold in nearly all portions of the civilized world, in European countries, especially Germany and England, and throughout the whole American continent. There are in the manufacture some 24 processes, from the cutting of the steel sheets into strips to the labeling and shipping of the boxes of finished pens. The steel, properly annealed, is rolled into the proper thickness according to style required and then cut into shape by dies. The blanks are then annealed the second time, stamped with name, and then receive the right curves and form in screw-presses. The careful and delicate workmanship is then advanced a stage by hardening or tempering, after which the half-finished pen must be ground and the points adjusted for sharp, blunt, stub, etc., as also slit, all of which is done by special machinery. The pens are then examined and defective ones thrown out, the next step being the coloring in gray, silver, bronze, nickel and gold plating, and varnishing, and when this is completed they are ready for packing, labeling and shipping for their extended journeys to destination.

The factory building is a large four-story brick one, covering a large area of ground, and fitted in all its numerous departments with the most complete machinery, much of it being of special design. The majority of the hands employed are skilled artisans, who have been educated for years to their special tasks and are experts in them.

The main distributing center for the goods is at the office in John street, New York City. The principals of the company are : President, Mr. Richard Esterbrook, the original creator of the works; Treasurer, Mr. Alexander C. Wood, and Secretary, Mr. Francis Wood, the latter gentleman being resident in New York, while the two former are representative citizens of Camden.

230

J. C. DUNN, JR., & CO., FLOOR OIL CLOTHS

IN the staple industry of manufacturing floor cloths, oil cloths, linoleums, etc., the city of Camden is supplied with several large factories, a prominent one being that of Messrs. J. C. Dunn, Jr., & Co., whose establishment is at Seventh street and Jefferson avenue. The business was commenced in March, 1882, with one building, to which large additions have been made from time to time, till now the factory numbers four separate structures, occupying about three acres of ground. The several departments of the industry are fully equipped with the latest improved machinery, including the best appliances for sizing, coating, and finishing the cloth, and grinding and mixing the paints. The print building has a capacity of twenty-four tables, equal in product to over a million square yards of cloth per annum. The line of production includes everything in floor oil cloths, mats, etc., stair oil cloths and rugs being a specialty, and embraces all grades and widths, with an almost infinite variety of designs and colorings. The Dunn oil cloths compare favorably with any in the market, being specially noted for their strong, honest, reliable character. The firm deal with jobbers only and sell their goods themselves. The bulk of their trade is done in the East, Philadelphia and New York being the chief points of shipment, although their goods are well-known throughout the South, and as far West as the Golden Gate.

About seventy men are employed in the different departments.

Pages 191 to 230

Pages 231 to 248


PETER YOUNG, BAGS AND BAGGING, PAPER-STOCK, &c., 
DELAWARE AVENUE

THIS establishment, which is a branch of the well-known Brooklyn house of the same name, was commenced in Camden in November, 1888. The Brooklyn house is one of long standing, having been started in 1870, and it is the only house, of any considerable extent, carrying on this special trade in this section. The line of business consists mainly in the handling of the bags and bagging used by the sugar trade, which, after having been used for the transport of sugar from Cuba, Demerara, and other places, are washed and sold by the sugar importers to Mr. Young.

After reaching his factory, they go through several processes to fit them for after-service. They must be exposed to the air like washed clothes, then dried by Steam, for which specially constructed machinery is used, and finally repaired and mended. They are then ready for the many purposes for which they are subsequently used, such as for holding potatoes, for packing ballast on shipboard, baling cotton, for dyewoods, and other uses where bags are required. Some have been used in the shipment of grain.


The business is a very extensive one, as may be seen from the fact that Mr. Young uses six millions of these bags or sacks annually. A very considerable trade is also carried on in paper stock for the use of paper manufacturers, jute, hemp-waste, etc.

The factory in Camden occupies the very large area of 180x450 feet, and extends through from Delaware avenue to Front street. Mr. Young also has a factory on Swanson street, Philadelphia, consisting of a large four-story brick building, of the size of 100x140 feet, used for the steam-drying. The premises occupied in Brooklyn are on an equally extended scale, occupying an area of nearly four acres, adjoining Wallabout Market, and consists of the main office, in Washington avenue, a large and fu"y equipped brick building, and a branch in Rodney street, Williamsburg. A large capital is employed, and between 200 and 300 hands are constantly engaged. Among the many busy factories of Camden this special industry makes a most noteworthy feature.

231

MORRIS & MATHIS, SHIPYARD, 
COOPER'S POINT.

PERHAPS none of the firms connected with the various ship-yards and marine railways at Cooper's Point are better or more favorably know to the maritime community than Messrs. Morris & Mathis, whose yards are among the largest and best equipped in this line. The property has a frontage on the river of about 1,500 feet, and the facilities are of the best, comprising all the necessary plant and conveniences for both building and repairing all classes of wooden vessels, as well as a fully equipped marine railway, capable of hauling out any sailing vessel arriving at the port of Philadelphia.

The firm commenced business in 1876, and have conducted a most successful trade down to the present time, especially in the department of repairing, which is a most important branch of the business.

The members of the firm are Messrs. Joseph I. Morris and John S. Mathis, both of whom are practical ship-builders, and stand high in the maritime community. They are no less business men of vim and ability, and are influential Camden citizens.

232

DAVID BA1RD, SPARS, TIMBER AND PILING, 
POINT AND PEARL STREETS

IN the important department of heavy timber for ships' spars and masts, for wharf building, and for all constructive work requiring massive girders, etc., the establishment of Mr. David Baird is one of the most prominent in Camden. Mr. Baird has been connected with this line of business for the past 30 years, and is therefore thoroughly practised and experienced in all its details. In 1873 he commenced the present firm, dealing in spars, heavy logs and timber, and piling, and now carries a stock which is the heaviest of this kind in the United States, and which is divided between the three cities, New York, Boston and Philadelphia. The yards and log-pens are located at Point and Pearl streets, having a large river frontage, and all the necessary conveniences, and the trade is one which may be said practically to extend to all parts of the country, the chief markets being New York City, New London, Boston, Mystic Bridge, Portland, Maine ; Gloucester, Mass., and the East generally. The spars, which vary in length from 30 to 100 feet, and from 6 to 40 inches in diameter, are either floated in rafts or brought by vessels from the lumber districts of Pennsylvania, Nova Scotia, New York State, Michigan and California, and are secured in the log-pens until needed. Some are sold in the rough, and others dressed and finished for their destined purpose, the majority being made into spars of various dimensions for shipping. The business is a heavy one in all its details, employs very large capital and much labor, both skilled and unskilled, and is almost entirely wholesale. It is an essentially water-side and maritime industry, and one for which the city of Camden, with its fine river frontage, is particularly well adapted.

In addition to his business in spars, Mr. Baird is also a considerable owner of vessel property, either owning entirely, or in part, a large number of sailing vessels and several tug-boats. He is an influential citizen of Camden, known and respected highly in all circles, especially in political life. He has held most of the prominent public municipal offices, and now sustains the responsible duty of Sheriff of Camden City and County.

233

LOEB & SCHOENFELD, MANUFACTURERS OF EMBROIDERIES AND LACES, FRONT & PEARL STREETS

THE City of Camden is distinguished by the possession of many noteworthy factories, but probably no one of them is more worthy of special mention than that of Messrs. Loeb & Schoenfeld, manufacturers of embroideries and laces, whose works are located at the corner of Front and Pearl streets. This establishment —which enjoys the distinction of being the only one of the kind in the United States—is a branch of the large house of the same name, which has been conducted by the firm for the last twenty years at Ror-schach, near the Lake of Constance, in Switzerland.

The productions of the firm consist of white Swiss embroideries for ladies' and children's dress goods, and laces and Oriental dress embroideries. These goods, which have acquired a standard reputation throughout both Europe and America, are imported into this country through the American branch, which has salesrooms and offices in New York at 86-88 Franklin street, and in Philadelphia at the Continental Hotel.

The American factory of the house in Camden manufactures American dress embroideries in the French styles, for which a most extensive trade has been secured in all parts of the country. The Camden factory was established in 1882, and uses only its own specially-constructed machines, built from the private designs of the firm. Fifteen of these machines are in use, and the number of operatives engaged is fifty.

The parent house at Rorschach is once whose size and importance are noteworthy. The factory building, which stands in a handsome lot of 36 acres, is a structure of the dimensions of 300 feet by 100 feet, one wing being four stories and the other three. It is thoroughly equipped with all the necessary power and appliances, and 145 embroidering machines are constantly running, the number of employees engaged in the building being 600, while about 2,000 are employed in piece-work outside.

The vast quantities of goods produced by this army of work-people are shipped to every part of Europe and America. The house makes the cotton yarn that is used, and dyes and finishes the goods themselves.

The individual members of this large and enterprising firm are: Messrs. Max and David Schoenfeld and Ferdinand L,. and Louis M. Loeb, all of whom are men of business and manufacturers of the first rank.

234 & 235

W. H. WILKINS & CO., LUMBER AND MILL WORK, 
513, 515 and 517 CHERRY STREET

A THOROUGHLY representative and deservedly prosperous enterprise among the many engaged in the lumber and millwork industry in Camden is the firm of Messrs. W. H. Wilkins & Co., whose mill is located at Nos. 513, 515 and 517 Cherry street. The firm is an old-established house in this line, though comparatively new in this city, to which they removed from Pennsylvania in 1885. The members of the firm are Mr. William H. Wilkins, and his son, Mr. Frederick W. Wilkins, the tamiiy being from the lumber district of Pennsylvania, in the neighborhood of Wil-liamsport and the Susquehanna. The mill premises comprise two buildings, one on each side of the street, of 50 by 100 feet, and 40 by 50 feet respectively, and both two stories high, the hands employed numbering about 45. All the general improved machinery, of the latest pattern, with much specially constructed for this house, is 10 be found here, together with all other necessary appliances, the line of production embracing doors,sashes,blinds, mouldings,brackets,scroll-sawing, stair-work in all its branches, etc.; with an important specialty in window frames and inside blinds which class of work alone, provides constant employment for some 20 men. A full stock of lumber, averaging about 70,000 feet, is constantly carried, as well as a supply of ready-made mill work, of the class most in demand, of the value of about $12,000.

A new feature in this trade, introduced by Messrs. Wilkins & Co., is the Florida moulding, for finishing, which, while fully equal in appearance and durability to the usual mouldings, is only one-half the expense. It has been well received by the trade, and is turned out in large quantities.

The house in an enterprising one, and the trade already large is continually on the increase, extending beyond the local connections, to Philadelphia and to most of the adjacent points. During the current-year the house has supplied the mill-work for between 300 and 400 houses in addition to the general business, a reliable earnest of still more extended operations in the near future.

The house is one of the flourishing mills in this city, and both the partners are business men of practical knowledge and push, and enjoy the esteem of a large circle.

236

THE CAMDEN NATIONAL BANK,
SECOND STREET AND KAIGHN AVENUE.

ONE of the chief elements in the material growth and progress of a community is the banking interest, and in this department of business, Camden boasts of several vigorous corporations, one of the most important being the Camden National Bank, located at Second street and Kaighn avenue. It was incorporated as a national bank in 1885, in order to provide for the needs of the merchants of South Camden, and though so young an institution, it is a remarkably successful one and from the date of its commencement, has enjoyed a large and liberal patronage including all the leading business houses of that enterprising and growing section of the city. It is a strong and reliable institution, holding a prominent place in, and exerting an active influence upon, the financial condition of the city. The capital is $100,000, and the surplus already reaches $25,000, and the dividends are six per cent, per annum. Since the organization of the bank, a handsome, modern new banking-house has been erected, into which the business was removed in 1888, and which is a prominent and elegant feature of Kaighn avenue. There are safe deposit boxes to rent in burglar proof vaults, while an element of saving fund banking is added by receiving small deposits from working people, subject to withdrawal on two week's notice, and allowing interest thereon.

The main business is a general banking one, including loans, deposits, anc discounts, collections being made on all chief cities of the United States through correspondents, and the volume of business has been from the start, and still is, a growing one, as is shown
by the last statement, recently issued, which gives total resources amounting to more than $805,000. The officers are: President, Mr. Zophar C. Howell; vice-president, Mr. John Cooper; and cashier, Mr. J.C. Martindale. The directorate is composed of prominent gentlemen of substantial position. They are Messrs. H.B. Wilson, William B. Mulford, C. B. Coles, P. H. Fowler, James Davis, C. E. Thomas, Isaac C. Toone, H. B. Anthony, G. W. Bailey, Howard M. Cooper, G. T. Haines, Z.L. Howell, H. C. Felton, R. W. Birdsell and D.S. Risley. The bank also has an office at Second and Walnut streets, Philadelphia.

237

SMITH & PFEIFFER, LUMBER AND MILL WORK,
AND
GEORGE PFEIFFER & SON, COAL, BRICK, STONE, etc., 
COOPER'S CREEK, FEDERAL STREET

THE lumber industry is one which is specially well represented in Camden, and among the many large firms engaged in this most essential and staple branch of trade, the house of Messrs. Smith & Pfeiffer stands in the first rank in all respects. The firm was started in January, 1889, and they are the successors to the lumber department of the old-established house of Messrs. George Pfeiffer & Son, so long and favorably known in the commercial circles of this city, which latter firm now confines their operations exclusively to the branch of coal, brick and stone. The premises of the two firms adjoin each other, occupying a large space of ground between Federal street on the southern side, the Pennsylvania Railroad and Cooper's Creek. The lumber yard of Smith & Pfeiffer is of the extent of 300 feet by 200, with ample shedding for keeping the lumber under cover, and i s at all times kept fully stocked with a supply of dressed and undressed lumber, averaging between three and four million feet. All the usual sorts of building lumber are kept on hand, such as flooring, fencing, sidings, planks, joists, wainscoting, etc., with many special kinds, and also a general stock of mill work—mouldings, doors, sash, brackets, etc.—in short, all the material of this character usually found in first-class establishments, the splendid facilities of the firm and their perfect knowledge of the trade, enabling them to offer customers lowest prices, and superior inducements They carry all classes of woods, both hard and soft, but the specialties are hemlock and white and yellow pine. The conveniences for shipment and handling goods are unsurpassed—the wharf on Cooper's Creels providing for water transportation, and the railroad side-tracks for that by rail.

The members of the firm are Mr. Richard F. Smith and Mr. George Pfeiffer, Jr., the latter being also the present proprietor of the business of George Pfeiffer & Son, the trade of which is of the same complete and extensive character in its department as that of lumber in its line. Their products are coal, hard brick, as as well as that known as "salmon'' and "stretchers,'' and foundation stone, in all of which they are the representative establishment in this city, conducting a business probably unsurpassed in this section.

Both Mr. Smith and Mr. Pfeiffer are prominent citizens of Camden, and business men of high ability and enterprise. They have also held prominent political positions—Mr. Pfeiffer now being State Senator, while Mr. Smith has held the offices of City Treasurer and Sheriff of Camden.

238

HENRY FREDERICKS, SASH, DOORS, BLINDS AND BUILDING HARDWARE,
133 TO 137 FEDERAL STREET

ONE of the most standard businesses in Camden is that of Mr. Henry Fredericks, the well-known dealer in building materials, of 133 to 137 Federal street. The establishment is one of the oldest in the city, and was commenced at Fourth and Federal streets, afterwards at Third and Federal, and finally, in 1864, was transferred to the present building, where it has now been for a quarter of a century.

The line of production includes everything necessary for building, such as Sash, Doors, Blinds, Mouldings, and all other planing-mill work, and also all the numerous details of building, housekeeping, and general hardware. The stock carried is of immense extent, and in its line of trade the house is the largest in this part of the State. The business is both wholesale and retail, and has extensive connections through the South, from Florida upwards, and also in Pennsylvania, Delaware and Maryland.

Two large adjoining warehouses are occupied, the second having been erected in 1884. About twenty hands are employed.

Mr. Henry Fredericks is one of the most prominent citizens of Camden. He is a leading merchant, and has also held the offices of Tax Collector for the Middle Ward in 1856, and in 1870 was Sheriff of Camden. He is a director of the First National Bank, and a member of Council for State Charities and Corrections. He is most ably assisted by his eldest son, Mr. William H. Fredericks, as Manager. This gentleman is active and enterprising in business, and very popular, worthily sustaining the family record.

239

MR. JOHN L. MILLS, MARINE RAILWAY & SHIPYARD, 
AT THE HEAD OF FIFTH STREET 

THE neighborhood of Cooper's Point has long been devoted to the ship-building industry and the various branches of work connected therewith, but there is good reason to believe that greater progress and development of this industry will be seen here within the next few years, than has ever yet occurred. One of the places where great advances have of late been made, and are still under way, is that of Mr. Mills's large ship-building yard, and marine railway, which latter is the largest and most powerful piece of machinery of this class in the United States. 

The carriage or platform on which the vessels rest, and on which they are drawn from the water, runs on double parallel tracks, and is hauled up by an immense chain, over 700 feet in length, each link of which weighs 43-3/4 pounds. It is operated by an engine of 50-horse power, which sets in motion several powerful, geared wheels, which, by repeated multiplication of power, generate force sufficient to raise a vessel of 2500 tons or more. The railway is also of such length as to be capable of accommodating two vessels at a time, if necessary.

In addition to the railway, there are here also all the appliances of a fully equipped ship-building yard, with everything necessary for constructing all classes of shipping, and a saw-mill is in course of construction, by which the facilities of the establishment will be still further augmented. A schooner of 600 tons is now on the stocks at this yard for Captain Davidson, of Camden. Mr. John Mills, the proprietor of the enterprising establishment, is an experienced ship-builder, having been engaged in it almost a lifetime, and the success which his skill and ability have thus far secured is beyond a doubt only a prelude to still greater advance in the near future. In the certain progress of the shipbuilding interest yet to be witnessed in this section, this yard must necessarily take a prominent position. A second railway is being added to the facilities of the establishment, which will haul vessels of 1,000 or 1,200 tons.

240


OLD STORE - NEW STORE
CHRISTOPHER C. CHEW'S PALATIAL DOUBLE STORES
214 AND 2l6 MARKET STREET.

CHRISTOPHER CHEW, DRY GOODS AND NOTIONS. 
214 and 216 MARKET STREET

UNDOUBTEDLY the largest concern in Camden in this particular line of business is that of the gentleman named above. This business was established many years ago by the present owner's father, Mr. J. F. Chew. In 1881 the son succeeded him, and by his shrewdness, enterprise and energy devoted to the business, made such a signal success that he found his old store, No. 216, entirely too small and inadequate for  
this largely increased trade. He has accordingly built a mammoth establishment, four stories high, 20x125 feet in dimensions, that is stocked from roof to cellar with a magnificent line of Dry Goods, Notions, etc.

The building has one of the handsomest and imposing fronts in the city, and is certainly a credit to the neighborhood. The old store is 20x80 feet in area, and it too is filled to repletion with a large and well selected stock.

Mr. Chew is well worthy the success he has achieved, being a wide awake business man, always anxious to benefit his trade in every possible channel. The name used for his stores, Bee Hive, is well chosen, for no more activity is displayed anywhere; the assistants vieing with proprietor in personal endeavors to maintain the business as the leading one
of the city.

During the gloomy days of the civil war Mr. Chew was patriotic and loyal to the core, then though but a boy thirteen years of age, it was his ardent desire to enlist in the army, but his extreme youth and shortness of stature was an insuperable obsticle and he accordingly was unsuccessful. Nothing daunted by this disappointment; he ran away from home and boarded a train that was taking soldiers to the front. He neither knew nor cared for its exact destination just so it toerk him where by some means he could get into actual service. He finally found himself in Washington, and there met quite a number of Camden young men whom he enlisted in his endeavor. His joy and satisfaction was great when Captain King, of Company G, took him as water carrier at $8.00 per month. His parents were greatly agitated over his sudden departure and after considerable search ascertained his whereabouts. They wrote to the Captain telling him if he found the boy at all incorrigible to immediately send him home. That such could not have been the case is shown in the fact that he served his country during and throughout Grant's entire campaign in the Peninsula, and Sheridan's through the Valley. Many a poor soldier had reason to thank this boy for the cooling draught of water that quenched his parched throat and many instances probably saved his life. This boy's services were constantly in demand, and many a stretcher on which was a wounded soldier has he helped to carry from the scene of carnage to the rear, where more safety was to be found. One of these grateful soldiers was Captain Damson of Company G, who was shot and terribly wounded by a sharpshooter, and who claims to this day, that had it not been for Mr. Chew he would have undoubtedly lost his life. The gentleman is now a prosperous orange grower in Florida, but frequently visits the North and never without coming to Camden to see his old friend. He never wearies telling of his thrilling experience, or the prominent part the subject of our sketch had to do with it.

Mr. Chew is a prominent member of several secret organizations, and is highly respected by all who know him or have had dealings with him.

241


CHRISTOPHER C. CHEW,
ONE OF CAMDEN'S LEADING BUSINESS MEN

242

GEORGE BARRETT & CO., TIMBER, LUMBER, AND SPARS, 
PEARL STREET WHARF.

THE timber and lumber business is a leading industry in Camden, and one of the most prominent of the firms engaged in it is that of Messrs. George Barrett & Co., whose large planing-mill and lumber yards are located at Pearl street wharf. The firm have been carrying on the business here for about twelve years, succeeding to Messrs. Barrett, Garrison & Co.,' who were preceded in the business by S. B. Garrison, and Bingham & Garrison.
The line of trade includes all the usual details of the timber and lumber business, with steam saw and planing-mill work, and especially the manufacture of white pine, yellow pine, spruce, and Oregon spars, for ships' masts and spars, wharf and railroad timber, telegraph poles, heavy building girders, and the like. This heavy timber is floated down from the points of production in large rafts, the immense logs averaging from fifty to one hundred feet in length, and are finally secured in the large water-space adjoining the firm's wharf, known as the log-pen. Here the great spars are kept chained to rows of piling until taken to the sawmill. The heavy yellow pine logs come mostly from Florida, and the South, the spruce spars from Bangor and other points in Maine, while large quantities of lumber and timber, especially of the Susquehanna oak, are also floated down the Susquehanna River from Clearfield county, Pennsylvania, where the firm own considerable tracts of forest property. From this section, chiefly Williamsport, and from Michigan, also come the lighter grades of general building lumber, white pine, hemlock, etc. An important specialty of the firm's business is the trade in Hackmatack ship knees, from Maine and Novia Scotia, for ship-building, and they also saw curved lumber for street railways, in which they are the only dealers in Camden.
The yards and wharf of the firm comprise in all a space of seventeen acres, and include the large steam saw and planing-mill, a building of 180 feet in depth, and 80 feet wide, in which is the special powerful machinery for cutting and planing the logs, the wharf, of 1000 feet in length, and 70 feet in width, where the lumber is landed from vessels, the log-pens, and the lumber and spar yards. The value of stock usually carried is about $100,000. The number of hands employed is about fifty.

The individual members of the firm are Mr. George Barrett, who resides in Camden, and Mr. A. W. Patchin, who superintends the business in Clearfield county. Both gentlemen are trained experts in all that pertains to this trade, as well as able men of affairs. Mr. Barrett is a prominent citizen of Camden, socially, politically, and commercially.

243


MR. S.B. GOFF

244

S. B. GOFF, MANUFACTURER OF PATENT MEDICINES, 
SECOND STREET AND BRIDGE AVENUE

THERE is scarcely a more familiar name than that of Mr. S.B. Goff the patent medicine man. The business done is one of the largest and best in the State. It was originally started by the present proprietor about 18 years ago in a much smaller way, and as business grew larger quarters were necessary, and the present large and commodious ones were secured. The building has an area of 60x100 feet, and is four stories high, the whole magnificent structure being occupied.

Among the many specialties turned out by the firm are the following: Indian Vegetable Cough Syrup, Great Dyspepsia Panacea, Magic Oil Liniment, Herb Bitters, Condition Powders, and Rheumatism Cure. These have all been on the market many years and are known to be just what is claimed for them.

Mr. Goff has thousands of testimonials from prominent people, who say that the medicine cured them. We can only find space for the following three:

Spottswood, N.J.,
June 6, 1889

Mr. S. B. Goff. Dear Sir: — Your Liniment is surely magic.
I have made cures where doctors have attended for one week,
at a cost of eight or ten dollars, by only one application of your
Magic Oil. And other cases which the doctors said could never
be cured, have been brought around by the patients taking it
according to the directions. It seems wonderful. I would
have it if I had to pay five dollars a bottle for it.

Yours Truly, 

WILLIAM SKINNER

Camden, N J., 
May 13, 1890,

S. B. Goff. 

Esteemed Friend: — Permit me to thank you for calling my attention to the virtues of your Cough Syrup. That cough that troubled me so was the worst I ever had, and nothing seemed to give me much relief until I got that sample bottle of yours, and that eased me so much that I soon sent the boy for a large bottle and it has worked like a charm. Well, you know how choked up I was on Monday night, and you heard me speak on Sunday afternoon for half an hour, and I feel like a new man. I don't want you to think I am getting into the the testimonial business, but I can't help saying "thank you" for the relief received. 

Sincerely Yours,

Charges Bowden, 
Inspector Esterbrook Steel Pen Works.

245

Spring Valley, N. Y., 
May 1, 1890.

Mr. S. B. Goff. 

Dear Sir :—I wish to give my testimony in behalf of your Herb Bitters. I have been troubled eighteen years with indigestion and costiveness, and I have taken almost all the known remedies, and last December I was induced to try your Herb Bitters, and I find no other medicine in eighteen years that had the effect your Herb Bitters have. So I would recommend all my fellow sufferers to give it a fair trial. My stomach has been so weak that it would not retain a glass of water, and as a bowel regulator it has no equal. You may publish this if you wish. 

Respectfully yours,

John D. Van Buskirk.

Ten capable and skillful people are employed, and four teams are constantly kept on the road taking orders from the merchants of ten surrounding States. The business was originally started at Cape May City, N. J. Moved from there to East Creek, later from there to Belle Plains Station, and finally from there to this city.

The accompanying engraving shows Mr. Goff's, residence as well as his business establishment. Not to mislead any one we may say right here that the residence is on the corner of Bridge avenue and Broadway while the building which is here described is on the corner of Second street and Bridge avenue. The factory is on the site of the old Weatherby Hotel, a landmark which our oldest resident no doubt will remember.

We can not close this too brief review without expressing a confident belief that the many specialties manufactured here will, in the future, obtain in consequence of their intrinsic merits an even wider popularity than in the past.

The Stockton Paper Mills, a handsome engraving of which appears in this work, will be more amply described in subsequent editions. The articles now being held for revision, as is also the articles and illustrations of Jacob Neutze's Central Stove Works, and W. Beale, M. D.

JOSEPH FRANKLIN, LIVERY STABLE, 
56 N. 2nd STREET

ONE of the oldest and most favorably known livery stables is that of Mr. Jos Franklin. The house has for many years been known as one in which a first class rig can be obtained.
The business was established by the present proprietor about two decades ago, and has been progressing since the opening.

The stable covers a plot of ground 60x80 feet in dimensions, and the building is one of the finest in the city devoted to the use of horses.

Mr. Franklin owns about thirty head of the finest stock in Camden. Some are handy for cab work, while others are lighter for the finer uses. He also has thirty light wagons and four handsome cabs, that are ever in demand.

The stable, on the whole, is one of the largest in the city and one that Camden may be proud to be the possessor of such an institution.

Mr. Franklin is a native of Hainesport, but has been a lifelong resident of the city. He is a prominent member of several secret societies in the city.

247

D. B. STRATTON, MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS, 
222 S. BROAD STREET, WOODBURY

BY all odds the best and most favorably known establishment of this character in this county the store of Mr. Stratton stands at the head. This business was originally opened about ten years ago, and has from the inception been most successful. 

An ample storeroom is used. It is finished in the most neat and attractive style. 

Mr. Stratton is the agent in this section for the Estey Organs, the acknowledged leader. These are manufactured in Brattleboro, Vermont. They are gotten up in the best manner. The design of the cases is entirely original, neat and tasty. They are possessed with a full and truly organ-like tone.

All kinds of Musical Instruments are also kept, including equipments for string and brass bands.

Music is furnished for balls and parties at the shortest notice. A store has been opened in Bridgeton, at No. 26 Laurel street.

Mr. Stratton is a native of Mullica Hill, this county. He is very extensively known and an energetic and active business man. He is also agent for Gloucester county, Salem and Cumberland counties, for the celebrated Dyer & Hughes Organ, an instrument that is attaining widespread popularity.

JOHN T. WATSON, CLOTHING & FURNISHING GOODS, 
BROAD AND COOPER STREETS, WOODBURY.

THE pioneer in the fine clothing trade in this section is Mr. Watson. This gentleman came here about one year ago, with the idea that a business of this character would pay here, and thus far he has received every assurance of success.

The store occupied is about 20 x 75 feet in dimensions, and is fitted in the neatest and most convenient manner.

A very heavy stock is carried, comprising all kinds of Men's Wear, Hats, Caps, Neckwear, Hosiery and Underwear, and Clothing. In every department the stock is most complete.
Particular attention is paid to Youths' and Boys' Clothing.

Mr. Watson is a native of Philadelphia. He is thoroughly acquainted with this line and fully alive to the demands of the trade. He was formerly manager for Messrs. Goodman Bros., at 13th and Ridge avenue, Philadelphia. He enjoys the closest relations with the manufacturers, and is thus enabled to get his goods at the lowest market prices.

248.

Pages 231 to 248

Pages 249 to 254

 

In addition to the foregoing there are the following: 

Henry Bott, 630 N. Front street, Barber. 
S. Flood, 622 N. Front Street, Meats. 
E. P. Townsend, Front and Penn Streets, Drugs. 
Pacific Laundry, 312 N. Front Street 
Mrs. Sarah Atkinson, 810 S. 5th Street, Cigars. 
S. S. Todd, 6:8 S. 5th Street, Grocer. 
J. F. Baker, 5th and Spruce Streets, Trimmings & Notions. 
J. B. Blumenthal, 509 N. 5th Street, Cigars and Tobacco. 
Richard S. Justice, 5th and Elm Streets, Druggist. 
H. B. Norman, 5th and Barley Streets, Grocer. 
E. J. Ross, 510 N. 5th Street, Barber. 
George Watson, 806 S. 5th Street, Oysters. 
J. H. Sauer, 517 S. 5th Street, Confectionery. 
Thomas McCarrick, 5th and Elm Streets, Shoes. 
J. T. Griffee, 1129 Broadway, Wall Papers. 
George Leathwhite, 908 Broadway, Plumber. 
William Bovell, 1126 Broadway, Shoe Manufacturing 
C. H. Green, 1116 Broadway, Patent Medicines. 
H. G. Burrichter, 1727 Broadway, Hay and Feed. 
C. L. Wadner, Broadway and Division Streets, Grocer. 
Horner & Son, Broadway and Stevens Streets, Grocers. 
Mrs. H. E. Harbison,426 Broadway, Trimmings & Notions.
T. J. Gifford, Broadway and Berkley Streets, Grocers. 
John Ernst, 618 Broadway, Bakery. 
William S. Ottinger, 911 Broadway, Paper Hanger. 
L. F. Folz, 1024 Broadway, Barber. 
Joseph Smith, 1144 Broadway, Cigars. 
James Welsh, 1813 Broadway, Butter and Eggs. 
J. H, Smith & Co., 810 Broadway, Wholesale Liquors.

249

W. L. Goldsmith, 1111 Broadway, Coal and Wood.
F. Brooks, Broadway and Clinton, leather & Findings.
Armea Morrisey, Broadway and Division Streets, Notions.
M. Davis, Broadway and Spruce Streets, Drugs.
R. F. Williams, 801 Broadway, Baby Carriages.
C. I,. Pelouze Jr., Kaighn's ave. and Broadway, Grocer.
Louis Shermer, 1903 Broadway, Cigars.
Shutts & Dreisbach, 140 Broadway, Confectionery.
George W. Swaney, 111 Broadway, Grocer.
W. H Young, 1148 Broadway, China and Glass. 
William H. Stephany, 102 Broadway, Milk. 
J. W. Donges, M. D., 1801 Broadway, Druggist. 
Isaac Ferris, Jr., 1548 Broadway, Shoe Manufacturing 
Fred Smith, 829 Broadway, Shoemaker. 
V. Kessling, 941 Broadway, Merchant Tailor. 
C. F. Danley, 1807 Broadway, Barber. 
Kifferly Morocco Manufacturing Co., Broadway. 
T. B. Wood, 1705 Broadway, Cigars. 
William Hage, 327 Arch Street, Bell Hangers. 
Boardman & Murphy, 223 Arch Street, Painters. 
A. Weber, 4th and Arch Streets, Barber. 
M.F. Ivins & Co., 325 Arch Street, Painters. 
Emil Mutscher, 324 Arch Street, Barber.
P. Kadel, 221 Arch Street, Bootmaker. 
L. H. Street, 3rd and Pearl Street, Druggist 
M. Herbst, 123 Kaighn's Avenue, Clothing. 
J. L. Williams, Jr., 134 Kaighn's Avenue, Oysters. 
Moses Gour, 249 Kaighn's Avenue, Boots and Shoes. 
James Hoe, 220 Kaighn's Avenue, Meats. 
Mrs. F. Conklin, 115 Kaighn's Avenue, Dry Goods. 
George H. Risley, Kaighn's Avenue, Cigars. 
George Belz, 247 Kaighn's Avenue, Bakery. 
Burnett Betts, Kaighn's Avenue, Bottler. 
M. E. Greenhouse, 338 Kaighn's Avenue, Installment House. 
T. Boyle, 257 Kaighn's Avenue, Credit House.
C. B. Van Name, 127 Kaighn's Avenue, Grocer. 
Philadelphia Shoe House, 308 Kaighn Avenue 
P. Dankelman, 117 Kaighn's Avenue, Grocer.

250

Carnden Pants Co., 265 Kaighn's Avenue 
Mrs. H. R. Varney, 421 Kaighn's Avenue, Dry Goods. 
H. B. Wilson, Front and Kaighn's Avenue, Coal and Wood. 
A. H. Davis, M. D., 3rd and Kaighn's Avenue, Druggist. 
J. E. Hewitt, 415 Kaighn's Avenue, Confectionery. 
W. H. Forbes, 449 Kaighn's Avenue, Men's Furnishing. 
Thomas Cowgill, 233 Kaighn's Avenue, Patent Medicine.
R. Wilkinson, 251 Kaighn's Avenue, Candy
G. H. Dowrick, 112 Kaighn's Avenue, Wheelwright
Thomas Devine, 306 Kaighn's Avenue, China. 
The Avenue Meat Market, 124 Kaighn's Avenue 
Carl Peters, 116 Kaighn's Avenue, Furniture. 
G. Lipschultz, 245 Kaighn's Avenue, Millinery. 
S. K. Hives, 312 Kaighn's Avenue, Butcher. 
Storm Bros., 127 Kaighn's Avenue, Hardware. 
R. J. Boyle, 326 Kaighn's Avenue, Installment House
Charles Read, 434 Kaighn's Avenue, Grocer. 
M. E. Francis, 324 Kaighn's Avenue, Dry Goods. 
E. J. Dougherty, 442 Kaighn's Avenue, Jewelry. 
G. W. Gardner, 6th and Pearl sis., Cigars. 
Richard Stephenson, 6th and Market Streets, Druggist. 
W. Campbell, 6th and Main Streets, Grocer. 
Michael Boyle, 6th and Jefferson Streets, Cigars. 
J. Ferguson, 530 N. 6th Streets, Grocer. 
H. W. Whitwell, 6th and Royden Streets, Druggist. 
S. H. Williams, 6th and Spruce Streets, Grocer. 
William Mochett, 6th and Washington Streets, Dry Goods. 
M. H. Mapes, 800 S. 6th Street, Flour. 
Michaels & Cory, 6th and Berkley Streets, Dry Goods. 
J. C. Seal, 6th and Elm Streets, Grocer. 
W. S. Deninger, 6th and Berkley Streets, Drugs. 
J. H. Kraut, 6th and Washington Streets, Grocer. 
Charles Rittmoyer, 6th and Washington Streets, Meats. 
Keystone Chemical Works, Jefferson Street 
I. Stiles, 5th and Stevens Streets, Grocer. 
M. Osmond, 5th and Pine Streets, Drugs. 
J. N. Bennett, 5th and Benson Streets, Drugs.

251

William Homan, 438 South 5th Street, Boots & Shoes.
H. Yuengling, 326 Federal Streets, Boots and Shoes.
F. L. Dickinson, Delaware and Wood Streets, Flour & Feed.
G. H. Howard, 101 Kaighn's Avenue, Cigars.
B. H. Boulton, 450 Kaighn's Avenue, Boots and Shoes.
M. E. Wilson, 453 Kaighn's Avenue, Cigars.
Charles Creger, 113 Kaighn's Avenue, Cigars and Tobacco. 
W. Hail, 305 Federal Street, Meats.
C. Caldwell, 306 Arch Street, Notions.
P. C. Verga, 11 Market Street, liquors.
Esterbrook Pen Co., Cooper Street
Phillips' Studios, 304 Market Street
W. R. Rogers, 3 South 2nd Street, Restaurant. 
E. Senseman, 510 Market Street, Printer. 
George Smith, 303 Kaighn's Avenue, Cigars. 
W. H. Hazele & Son, 504 Market Street, Meats.
B. F. Sutton, 412 Federal Street, Jeweler.
Joseph Etto, 109 Kaighn's Avenue, Clothing.
S. Andrews, 504 Federal Street, China.
Charles Goudaling, 242 Kaighn's Avenue, Boots and Shoes.
W. W. Hollis, 429 Kaighn's Avenue, Candy.
Mrs. Ritter, 510 Federal Street, Umbrellas.
J. C. Dunn, Jr., & Co., 7th and Jefferson Streets, Oil Cloths
A. Priestley & Co., 6th and Jefferson Streets, Suitings.
Smith & Pfieffer, Cooper's Creek, Lumber Yard.
C. S. Caffrey & Co. 10th and Market Streets, Carriage Builder
Paul H. White, Broadway and Bukley Streets, Meats.
Jasper Burnstine, 137 Kaighn's Avenue, Installment House.
Morris & Mathis, Cooper's Point, Ship Yard.
W. Chester, 125 Main Street, Lamps, etc.
S. Chew, Front and Market Streets, Printer.
Mrs. M. Cook, 3rd and Elm Streets, Notions
Hussong & Co., 609 Pearl Street, Dyers.
C. Kinters, 2n and Federal Streets, 5 and 10 cent store.
D. F. Wheatman, 1013 Newton Avenue, Plumber.
John Neeff, 509 Benson Street, Tinware.
William S. Bovell, 1700 Fillmore Street, Grocer.

252

Carl E. Trebing, 430 Main Street, Boots and Shoes.
M. S. Ervin, 428 Federal Street, Grocer,
L. B. Hirst, 592 Federal Street, Drugs.
T. Murphy, 522 Federal Street, Dry Goods
J. Cherry, 550 Federal Street, Oysters.
E. Schneider, 4th and Federal Streets, Baker.
S. W. Holland, 528 Federal Street, Sewing Machines.
F. T. Tobey, 530 Federal Street, Sewing Machines.
J. H. Cox, 800 Federal Street, Meats.
L. B. Jackson, 94 Federal Street, Installment House.
Louis Kissel, 410 Federal Street, Barber.
W. L. Hartman, 216 Federal Street, Fruits.
J. S. Simmons, 207 Federal Street, Clothing.
H. Ross, 632 Federal Street, Grocer.
Mary B. Bowden, 338 Federal Street, Millinery.
James L. Harris, 21st and Federal Streets, Horse Shoer.
William T. Weiss, 23rd and Federal Streets, Cigars.
Lewis Clark, 413 Federal Street, Wall Papers.
Miss McKee, 536 Federal Street, Notions.
Marshall & Stone, 127 Federal Street, Lime and Cement.
Charles Brown, 512 Federal Street, Grocer.
Sharpless & Bro., Cooper's Creek, Feed.
William Stein, 309 Federal Street, Gunsmith.
Hunt's Studios, 321 Federal Street
William B. Tyler, 139 Federal Street, Meats.
Albert Hitz, 2001 Federal Street, Grocer.
D. McNeill, 2ist and Federal Street, Dry Goods.
R. R. Miller, 112 Federal Street, Insurance.
Graw, Garregues & Graw, 181 Federal Street, Printers.
G. D. Vansciver, 124 Federal Street, China.
Jacob Moyer, 2ist and Federal Streets, Barber.
W. P. Irving, 2ist and Federal Street, Meats.
George P. Stephany, 340 Federal Street, Cigars.
F. W. Fuller, 217 Federal Street, Jeweler. 
R. Shill, 526 Federal Street, House Furnishings. 
J. Goehringer, 2ist and Federal Street, Horse Shoer. 
W. F. Vanderslice, 505 Federal Street, Grocer.

253

William Barber, 223 Federal Street, Hardware. 
J. H. Haines, 203 Federal Street, Grocer. 
H. W. Test, 2d and Federal Street, Drugs. 
G. W. Husted, 512 Federal Street, Dyers. 
J. C. Burns, 23 Federal Street, Blacksmith. 
Mrs. J. H. Wells, 2004 Federal Street, Grocer. 
Seeds & Co., 234 Federal Street, Hats. 
Hyde & Co., Io8 Federal Street, Auction House.
Elwyn D. Steen, 313 Federal Street, Cigars.
W. D. Hart, 508 Federal Street, Cigars.
C. H. Turner, 215 Federal Street, Printers.
F. E. Gardner, 229 Federal Street, Furniture.
J. Borsch, 408 Federal Street, Cigars.
J. S. Middleton, 5th and Royden Street, Flour. 
Henry Wille, 509 Market Street, Carpets. 
Henry C. Wille, 507 Market Street, Furniture.
G. G. Potter, 404 Market Street, Boots and Shoes.
Mary I. Logan, 4th and Market Street, Meats.
Fithian S. Simmons, 305 Market Street, Undertaker.
Isaac Seligman, 117 Market Street, Cigar Manufacturing
James Barry, Jr., 513 Market Street, China.
Thomas F. & William J. Logan, 505 Market Street, Meats.
A. Rudolph, 4th and Market Street, Confectionery.
Luther L. Jones, 510 Market Street, Paper House.
George Weihman, 833 Market Street, Liquors.
A. Schmidt, 537 Market Street, Barber.
Emmanuel Nunes, 516 Market Street, Clothing.
J. W. Mador, 503 Market Street, Grocer.
E. C. Webb, 1124 Market Street, Meats.
Anton Hubel, 832 Market Street, Tinware.
Amassa D. Bacon, 933 Market Street, Cigars.
Conrad Walz, 931 Market Street, Meats.
G. D. Klein, 901 Market Street, Barber.
N. F. Richards, 309 Market Street, Drugs.
J. E. Frain, 533 Market Street, Notions.
Charles E. Wenz & Bro., 821 Market Street, Grocers.
J. H. Chew, 220 Market Street, Dry Goods.

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GLOUCESTER CITY

HADDONFIELD

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