Woodbury

 

This delightful town is so well known, 'tis scarcely necessary to comment on its many advantages. Passing through it on the cars prejudices one in its favor immediately, for its neat, wide, shaded streets, and grassy lawns and playing fountains about the artistic houses, harbor an inviting air, and bespeak a thrifty enterprise of the five thousand inhabitants. It has six churches (Baptist, Catholic, Episcopal, Methodist, Presbyterian), and private and public schools, banks and opera house, gas and water, telegraphic, mail and express communication—in fact, every city convenience. It is the county seat of Gloucester County.
Prominent among its business enterprises may be mentioned : 

NEWTON'S HOTEL, MAHLON W. NEWTON, Proprietor.

CONSIDERING the nearness to Philadelphia it is v surprising what a remarkably good hotel Wood-bury possesses. This hotel was originally built prior to 1808; there was a stone in the original building dating then. After passing through the hands of various proprietors it came under the management of Mr. Newton about twelve years ago; when he took possession it was in a very bad condition; it has been rebuilt at various times, the greatest improvements having been added in 1885, when it was entirely rebuilt. The building is three stories, built of brick, and in every way furnished most handsomely, containing fifty sleeping rooms. It is heated throughout with steam and lighted with gas. Electric bells have been introduced into all rooms. All the modern conveniences are in operation. The cuisine is under the management of a most competent chef.

Mr. Newton, the proprietor, is an ideal host, having been in this line for many years. He has taken an active part in the development of the city, being one of the prime movers in the Gas Company and President of the Electric Light Company.

A fine bar is kept constantly supplied with the best quality of liquors and ample stabling room adjoins the premises.

JOHN SEEDS, GROCER AND MANUFACTURER OF RAG CARPET, 
S. BROAD ST.

THERE are but few better or more favorably known A houses in this section than that of Mr. J. Seeds. This estimable gentleman established business in this city about nine years ago, and has grown from comparative smallness to a very large business. The premises occupied are about 20x70 feet in dimensions, with a weaving room in the rear. A full stock of Groceries, Provisions, Crockery, etc. Tinware is carried, comprising all qualities and kinds. Four looms are kept running in the weaving department. All kinds of rag carpet are made to order. Mr. Seeds is a practical weaver himself.

Mr. Seeds has been a life-long resident of this county. He is an active member of the Iron Hall, Knights of the Golden Eagle, and the Post G. A. R., having served four years in the 2d New Jersey Cavalry, and was discharged with honor.

MRS. S. MORRISON, CONFECTIONERY, 
210 SOUTH BROAD STREET.


THERE are no business houses in this section that -*• have achieved a better reputation than that of Mrs. S. Morrison. This lady opened business many years ago in Chester, and about two years ago a branch store was opened here under the management of her son, Mr. Robert Morrison. This gentleman by his great industry and energy has built up an enormous trade here.
The premises are about 20x180 feet in dimensions, with a large store and ice cream garden.
The parlor has a seating capacity of about fifty persons. All kinds of Cakes and Confectionery are kept. Particular attention is paid to serving patrons, weddings and balls.

The trade of the house is extremely large, and includes some of the best families in the city. Mr. Morrison, the manager, is thoroughly capable, having had many years experience in this line.

H. B. SIMMERMAN, GROCERIES, 
29 COOPER ST.

THERE are but few houses in this city that have sprung A into popularity quicker than that of Mr. H. B. Sim-merman. This gentleman came to this city a year and a half ago from Trenton and purchased this business; at first it was very small, but it has constantly been increasing until now the trade is very large and steadily increasing. The premises occupied are about 35 feet square and fitted in the nicest and neatest manner. A very large stock is carried, comprising all kinds of Fancy and Staple Groceries, Salt Meats, and Fresh Country Produce.
The services of four capable salesmen are required and two teams are kept busy delivering orders.

Mr. Simmermau enjoys the closest relations with the importing and jobbing houses in New York and Philadelphia, and is thus enabled to procure the best articles for the least possible cost.

In addition to the foregoing there are the following : Chas. Walton, 21 S. Broad st., Coal and Lime. 

John Redfield, Cooper st., Ice Cream.
B. H. Davis & Son, 31 Cooper st., Seed Potatoes and Land Dealers.
D. B. Stratton, 222 S. Broad st., Musical Instruments. 
D. H. Snyder, 216 S. Broad St., Jeweler.
Nathan W. Hill, 15 S. Broad St., Boots and Shoes. 
L. Brown & Co., Green's Block, Hardware & Lumber. 
Henry Eraas, S. Broad st., Boots and Shoes. 
H. Lippincott, Broad and German sts., Dry Goods and Notions.
R. B. Heppard, 81 S. Broad st., Groceries. 
Jos. F. Sitley 

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