Merchantville

 

This attractive town has one thousand inhabitants, with four churches (Presbyterian, Episcopal, Methodist and Baptist), on public school, and mail, express, and telegraphic facilities. It is situated in a section of the State noted for healthfulness and desirability of climate. The dwellings are of striking and artistic architectural design, while grassy laws surround almost all the residences, and beautiful old trees sheltering the wide avenues form pretty vistas while they furnish grateful shade.

Prominent among its business enterprises may be mentioned:

CONRAD DEMMY, MEATS AND PROVISIONS, MERCHANTVILLE.

THERE are few stores in this section that have a 1 better reputation than that of Mr. Conrad Demmy. This genial and courteous gentleman opened business here about eight years ago and has since met with the greatest success. The store is about 20x20 feet in dimensions. A handsome refrigerator occupies one corner. Here may be found a large selection of the choicest cuts of meat.

Fresh Fruits and Provisions are-also handled extensively. The stock carried is always the best that the markets afford. Employment is given to one capable assistant and a team is kept to deliver orders.

Mr. Demmy has been a well known resident of Merchantville for nearly half a century; he has always been found among those looking towards its best interests. Mr. Demmy is among our oldest and best dealers in Home Dressed Meat.

PHILIP BERGER, BARBER, MERCHANTVILLE.

A MONG the most prominent barber shops in this ĽA- vicinity may be mentioned that of Mr. Philip Berger. This gentleman opened business here about four years ago. The shop is about 20 feet square, fitted in the best and neatest manner. A large selec -tion of Cigars and Tobacco is also kept. A capable assistant is in constant attendance.
Shaving is attended to in cases of sickness or death. Ladies' and Children's Hair Cutting is made a specialty of.

Mr. Berger is a native of Germany, but has been in this country for many years; he formally resided in Philadelphia, coming here when he opened the shop.

BROOKS & DICKEY, GENERAL STORE, MERCHANTVILLE.

WITHOUT a doubt the handsomest store in this W vicinity is that of Messrs. Brooks & Dickey. These gentlemen established business under the hall about eight years ago, and as the trade grew the quarters were found to be too small. The present store was built and occupied about two years ago. The store is about 40x80 feet in dimensions, fitted in the newest and best manner.

The stock carried is large and varied, comprising full lines of Groceries, Canned Goods, Provisions, Fruits, Dry Goods, Underwear, Hosiery, Notions, Boots and Shoes, Hats and Caps, and Hardware, in fact almost everything that can well be imagined as coming under any of these heads. Six capable assistants are constantly employed and four teams are kept to deliver orders.

The members of the firm are Henry Brooks & Cli C. Dickey; both gentlemen are well and favorably known, socially and commercially.

In addition to the foregoing there are the following: 

Fred. Ritter, Ice Cream and Confectionery. C H Jennings, M. D., Druggist.
D. Leonard Moore, Wall Papers.
T Reed & Co., Plumbers.
Theo. Sanselin, Meats and Provisions.
E. Kirby, General Store.
H. S. Fortiner, Tinsmith.
John Scharnagle, Boot Maker.
G. W. Algor, Plumber.
Mrs. C. V. Sivel, Millinery.
G. C. Mick, Cigars.
Stockton Hotel, W. W. Pancoast, Proprietor.
John S. Collins, Hardware.
W. G. Loor, Tinsmith.
William Stone, Grocer.
C. H. Johnson, Dry Goods and Notions.
Frederick Harting.


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