Streets
of
Camden, NJ

Green Street


GREEN STREET is a small one-block street that lies west of Haddon Avenue and runs south from Liberty Street to Mechanic Street. There is one single family home and seven row-homes, all built after 1906, on Green Street.

Do you have a Green Street memory or picture. Let me know by e-mail so it can be included here.

 Phil Cohen


Click on Images to Enlarge

Intersection of Liberty Street & Green Street
   
 
 
 
 
   

1300 Block of Green Street
  1300 Green Street

1947

  1302 Green Street

1947

  1304 Green Street

1947

  1306 Green Street

1947

  1308 Green Street

1947

  1309 Gold Street

1947

  1310 Gold Street

1947

  1312 Gold Street

1931-1933
Mrs. Anna Pogrozewski & Family
widow of Felix Pogrozewski
Henry Pogrozewski
Stanley Pogrozewski

1947


Intersection of Mechanic Street & Green Street
   
 
 
 
 
   

Camden Courier-Post * June 21, 1933

Mysterious Piece of Paper' Enlivens Numbers Trial Here 
Judge Shay Enjoys Verbal Tilt Between Gotshalk and Walter Keown,
But It Fails to Enter Into Evidence

A mysterious piece of paper yesterday precipitated a verbal battle between Assistant Prosecutor William C. Gotshalk and Defense Attorney Walter S. Keown upon opening of the trial of Joseph and Fred Klosterman on charges of number writing. They were placed on trial before Judge Samuel M. Shay and a criminal court jury. 

Acting Lieutenant Louis Shaw, of the city detective bureau, testified of a raid on the Klosterman saloon at Mechanic and Green streets and an adjacent house at 1312 Green street. The witness identified a brief-case containing numbers slips and also a postal card addressed to "F. Klosterman." 

When Shaw was turned over to Keown for cross-examination, the defense counsel reached into the case, pulled out a piece of paper and asked how it had gotten into the bar. When Shaw said he had put it there, Keown declared: 

"Well, put it into your pocket. It has nothing to do with this case." 

Shaw refused, whereupon Keown rolled it up into a ball and put it in his own pocket. At this, Gotshalk angrily demanded to see the paper, but Keown declared that "you can't see this until after the jury has gone out." When Gotshalk insisted, Keown said he would give it to Judge Shay. He threw it on the judge's desk, but Judge Shay, who was smiling broadly, made no move to take it. Gotshalk then reached out to get the paper, but Keown was quicker retrieving it and placing it in his pocket again.

"What right have you to take a state exhibit and place it in your pocket?" Gotshalk queried heatedly. "I want that paper." 

"I'll show it to Judge Shay," parried Keown. 

"I don't want to see it," laughed Judge Shay, as Keown paced around the courtroom, followed by Gotshalk. 

"It has nothing to do with this case," repeated Keown. 

And there the matter stood. 

Shaw testified that he, Detective Clarence Arthur and Patrolman John Kaighn entered the saloon December 10, and went out the back door. They followed a path to the Green street house, broke down the door and found Henry Pogrozewski, 17, and his mother burning numbers slips in a stove. Shaw said he recovered a half basket of slips. 

Shaw and Arthur also declared that they found a bell in the house and that it was connected to a push button in the saloon, allegedly for an alarm. 

Mary King, deputy city clerk, testified that at the time of the raid the license for the saloon was in Joseph Klosterman's name. 

Shaw's testimony was corroborated by Arthur and Kaighn. Shaw was then recalled to the stand and related that as the three detectives went from the saloon to the other house, the Klosterman brothers followed them and demanded to know "why the dicks are always picking on us." 

The case will be resumed this morning. . 


Camden Courier-Post - June 22, 1933

KLOSTERMAN BOYS FOUND GUILTY IN NUMBERS CASE 
Camden Brothers Released in Bail Awaiting Sentence 
'THEY ARE BIG SHOTS,' PROSECUTOR DECLARES 
Both Defendants Deny Connection With Raided Saloon

Joseph and Fred Klosterman were convicted in Camden Criminal Court yesterday of operating a numbers racket. 

A jury returned a guilty verdict against the two South Camden sportsmen-brothers at 6:25 p. m., after deliberating only a short while. 

Both were in the courtroom when the verdict was announced, but were allowed to depart under bail pending sentence later by Judge Samuel M. Shay

Judge Shay delivered his charge to the jury after denying motions by Walter S. Keown, defense counsel, first to quash the indictment on grounds that 
its language was faulty, and second, to direct a verdict of not guilty for lack of evidence.

Called 'Big Shots' 

The two brothers were characterized as "big shot numbers barons" by Assistant Prosecutor William C. Gotshalk in his closing argument to the jury. 

Referring to a woman and her son, who were burning numbers slips when raiders entered the establishment, Gotshalk said: . 

"They might ask us why we don't have that woman and her 17-year­old son on trial here. When the police make an arrest the public wants to know why we don't get the big shots. Well, here they are," pointing at the Klostermans. "Here are the big shots," 

The Klosterman saloon, Mechanic and Green Streets, was raided December 10 by city detectives who testified Tuesday they followed a footpath to an adjacent house at 1312 Green Street. They broke down the door and found a woman and her son burning numbers slips. Acting Lieutenant Louis Shaw, of the city detective bureau, testified he recovered some of the slips and also found a brief case containing numbers slips and a post card addressed to "F. Klosterman." Detective Clarence Arthur and Patrolman John Kaighn corroborated Shaw's testimony. 

Says He Was Visitor 

The defense opened with Joseph Klosterman on the stand. He testified he had nothing to do with the saloon when it was raided, but merely happened to be in there for a drink when the raiders entered. He said he had owned the saloon for three and a half years but sold it last July for $100. He never had any connection with the Green Street house, he declared. He is now a plumber, Klosterman averred. 

When Assistant Prosecutor Gotshalk asked him if he had ever been convicted of crime, Keown asked that the jury be withdrawn as he wanted to make another motion. Court then recessed. 

When court resumed Mrs. Anna Pogroszewski, of the Green street address, took the stand. She testified the Klostermans were not connected with her home in any manner. She testified she had rented a room to a man named "Tommy" and all the numbers apparatus was his. When he moved out, he left the slips and adding machines there, she said, and she had cleaned out his room and was burning the papers when the raiders arrived. 

Fred Klosterman, who resides at 1255 Decatur Street, denied he was a "numbers baron" and said he merely "happened" to be there on the day of the raid. Under cross-examination he admitted having pleaded guilty to slot machine charges in June of last year.

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