WOODROW WILSON HIGH SCHOOL

WOODROW WILSON HIGH SCHOOL at 3101 Federal Street in East Camden, originally was built as a junior high school. The school opened in that capacity by February of 1930. 

In June of 1933 Camden reorganized its schools. Woodrow Wilson became a high school, specializing in commercial and practical arts. The junior high school students were shifted to the Cramer school, which became a junior high schools, and the Garfield and Dudley Schools reabsorbed seventh grade students. 

The above picture was taken in 1934. The school sits opposite Dudley Grange Park, which for many years housed a branch of the Camden Public Library. 

Woodrow Wilson High School
1939

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to Enlarge

 

Camden Courier-Post - February 10, 1930

P. O. S. A. WILL PRESENT FLAG TO JUNIOR HIGH

A parade is being planned by the Patriotic Order of Sons of America for Washington's Birthday, when a flag will be presented to the new Woodrow Wilson Junior High School by Camp No. 25.

The parade will be formed at the Harry C. Sharp School, Thirty-second Street and Hayes Avenue, and proceed to the new school at Thirty-second and Federal Streets. George B. Cassidy, past district president, will be marshal of the parade.

The presentation will be made by Neal L. Jamerson, past state master of forms, and accepted by Samuel E. Fulton, president, on behalf of the board of education. Mayor Winfield S. Price will be among the speakers.

Camden Courier-Post - June 8, 1933

3 CAMDEN STUDENTS GET DEGREES AT N. Y. U.

Three Camden residents, including two school teachers, were among the 4.000 students graduated from New York University yesterday at the 101st commencement exercises at Ohio Field, University Heights, New York.

The Camden students are Miss May Marchant, 422 Linden Street, teacher at Woodrow Wilson Junior High School, Bachelor of Science degree in School of Education, Bella Polivnick, 1449 Ormond Avenue, teacher in Camden High School, Bachelor of Science degree in School of Education, and Charles E. Hutchinson, 1353 Park Boulevard, Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering, School of Engineering.

Camden Courier-Post - June 9, 1933

HIGH SCHOOLS HERE REVISED; JUNIOR-SENIOR PLAN CUT OUT 
New System Gives Choice of Academic or Commercial and Arts Courses 
SAVES $500,000 ANNEX, RELIEVES CROWDING 
Hours Reduced; Study Programs Rebuilt; Omit Spanish; Music Optional

By FRANK SHERIDAN

Reorganization of Camden junior and senior high schools has been effected with the approval of the local and state boards of education.

By establishing the Camden Academic High School and Camden Commercial and Practical Arts High School the school population of the present Camden High School will be reduced 50 percent when the September terms begin, according to Dr. Leon N. Neulen, superintendent of schools. 

It also will reduce the student roster of all junior high schools even with the promotions of this month added. 

Saves $500,000 

"This plan will give Camden room for expansion for years to come in high school education and preclude the necessity of building the $500,000 annex to the senior high school, plans for which have been drawn at the cost of thousands of dollars," Dr. Neulen declares. 

"It will eliminate a number of studies and give the students more education in the more essential subjects. The hours of instruction will be reduced from 30 hours per week to 23. The state law's minimum is 19 hours."

Dr. Neulen points out that 2400 students are now registered in Camden High School and promotions from junior school this month would have added 700 more. Under the new plan 1500 will attend the Academic High School and 1300 the Commercial school. 

The balance will be redistributed back into the junior and seventh grade grammar schools. 

Wilson High Commercial 

The new plan will cause a general redistribution of pupils in East Camden because the Woodrow Wilson Junior High School will become the Commercial high. The present junior high pupils will be sent back to Cramer school, from which they originally were transferred. Students in the Garfield and Dudley Schools will take their seventh grade in those institutions instead of junior high. 

Camden Junior High School No. 1, which now hall 849 pupils, will have 730 next term, Hatch Junior High School has 1106 pupils now and will have 1127 next term. Woodrow Wilson Junior High School now has 970 pupils and will have 643 at the Cramer school

Four Courses at Academic High 

Dr. Neulen explained that the new Academic High School will teach four courses: College preparatory, college technical, normal preparatory and general. Students will be given four-year courses, in the first three mentioned courses and three years in the latter. Camden High is now a three-year school. 

That will mean the ninth, tenth, eleventh and twelfth grades will be taught in the college preparatory, college technical and normal preparatory and the tenth, eleventh and twelfth in the general course. 

The Commercial and Practical Arts High School will teach commercial and practical arts courses in three-year courses in the tenth, eleventh and twelfth. 

Practical arts will be taught exclusively to boys in the school because only 27 girls elected to take that course this year and they will be transferred to Academic in the Fall, Dr. Neulen explained. 

Four Years Latin; No Spanish 

The new plan provides for the teaching of general foreign languages but eliminates Spanish because of so few taking the subject. Latin will be taught four years, French three and German two. 

A general business course is included in the plan known as introductory business to be taught at the Commercial High. Students will start this course in the last junior high year. 
The practical arts course to be taught at Commercial will enable a student to continue manual training and shop begun in the junior years. The student may elect from automobile mechanics and electrical, print shop or woodworking. 

Art and Music Optional 

Art and music no longer will be compulsory under the new plan. Students in Academic will be taught music and art appreciation during the first two years and may discontinue those studies in their last two years. 

A complete business course has been mapped out for Commercial. 

The students are given elementary business practice in their ninth year. During their first year at Commercial High bookkeeping, typewriting and shorthand is added.

During the third and fourth year they will elect from three sequences to fit them for secretarial positions and general business. Sequence A provides for the continuation of shorthand and typewriting in the third year and office practice is added in the fourth. Sequence B in the third year teaches bookkeeping, business organization and marketing. Common law, bookkeeping and practice is added in the fourth year. Sequence C provides business organization, marketing, exchange and selling. Commercial art and advertising is included in the fourth year. 

As students advance through the Commercial course they may be transferred from one sequence to another. This will be guided by their adaptability or whether they desire to follow a secretarial or business career.

If students elect Sequence A they may have the option of bookkeeping or world history in the third year. Business organization may be taken instead of American history in the fourth year.

Camden Courier-Post - June 21, 1933

WILSON JUNIOR HIGH WILL GRADUATE 116 AT 2 TOMORROW 
87 Girls and 79 Boys Will Be 'Given Diplomas at Exercises 
STUDENTS TO SPEAK.

Diplomas will be presented at 2 p.m. tomorrow to 166 graduates at commencement exercises of Woodrow Wilson Junior High School, Thirty-third and Federal Streets. There are 87 girls and 79 boys graduating from the 9th grade. This school becomes Camden Commercial High School in the fall.

Three honor students will deliver addresses, They are Ernest Hartline, vocational; Elsie Knorr, commercial, and Rita Draper, college preparatory. A program will be given by the school orchestra. A solo wlll be given by Miriam Schuck. 

The graduates follow:

Leah Alder, Harris M. Ackerman, Maybelle Alcott, Carl Anderson, John T. Andrews, Regina Andrews, Jean Armstrong, Fred Balint, Raymond Banford, Margaret Becker, Elizabeth R. Berner, William C. Blessing, Joseph Blessinger, Jr., Jack Birbeck, Horace A. Blizzard Jr. 

Helen Bach, Kenneth Borman. Eva Mae Brinton, Helen V. Brown, Irving Buchanan, Jeanette Carson, Anna. May Casey, Mildred Chambers, Irene Cohen, Emma Creely, Robert Danaher, Russell Daniel, Madeline Danner.

Oliver Davis, Harry S. Derrickson, Samuel Doerr, Walter Doran, Rita Draper, Myrtle Drew, Harry Dunkleberger, John Dwyer, Joseph Edward Falana, William Fensch, Doris Fisher, R. Louise Fowler, Jack A. Gardner.

Bessie Gartmann, Morris Gaudet, Raymonda Gehret, Mary Genther, Linda M. Getz, Virginia Gideon, Sidney Goldberg, Virginia Grau, James Green, Chandler B. Grover, Stella L. Handleton, Harold E. Hansel, Alice Harker, Ernest Hartline, Mary Hartman.

Ralph M. Heidi, George Hicks, Edna Hoffman, George S. Hoffman, John Horn, Allen Howe, Earl Hoxworth, Harry Hubner, Samuel G. Hughes, Edward R. Hurtt, Frank Idell, Dorothy L. Ivory, Jane Jackson, Walter Jefferson. 

Anita Keenan, Harold Keller, Betty F. Ketrow, Pearl Kieffer, Ruth Kienzle, Susanna Kille, Ethel Kinsella, Elsie Knorr, Erica J, Koehler, Stanley Ksiazek, Ida LaMont, Alice Landenberger, 
Hilda Lee, John Lee. 

Katherine E. Lemberger, Charles Leon, Eugene Letts, Ethel J. Lengenfelter, Marie Loeffler, Elsie Lokan, Regina W. Loney, Ruth Longfellow, William MacKenzie, Agnes Madison, William E. Manns, Alan F. Marlor, Miriam Mattison, Veronica F. Mayer, Mary McAndrews, Joseph James McCormick, Robert S. McCormick.

James McFadden, Charles K. Megronigle, Robert G. Middleton, Edward F. Miller, Earl Mollenkopf, Richard Moore, Warren J. Marley. Lillian Morrell, John Morris, Howard Morrow, Erma Paulsen, Frances Peraria, Mary Pfeiffer, Paul Pharo, Ida Potts, William E. Powell, Benjamin P. Putnam. 

Arthur Raws, Jr., Helen Read, Dorothy Rolhmann, William Rhile, Marion P. Richard, Jeanne Roegner, Maurice Rosen, Kila E. Rue, Lillian Saccomanno, Dorothy Sattler, Ruth M. Saul, Violet Schenck, Margaret Schirmer, Jack Schiselbauer, Marion Schloendorn.

Albert J. Schoelkopf. Albert A. Schofield, A. Miriam Schuck, Eleanor Selfridge. Mary F. Senor, Bernice Sharp, Harold Shugart, Eleanor Smith, Ethel Smith, Robert Spagel, G. Arthur Spohn, John M. Sviben, William Swanson, Harriet Sweeten, Pauline Terry, Beatrice Mae Thompson, Frances T. Tischner.

Charles W. Townsend, Edmund Trimmell, John Tufnell, Marie Van Saun, Cecelia Walker, Donald Wark, Anna Watson, Gertrude Werner, George J. Wilson, Florence Winter, Edith Woods, Miome Zinn, Hazel Zondler, Bertram Zumeta.


Camden Courier-Post - June 23, 1933

Mitchell Mozeleski Is Assigned to Coaching 
LOCAL STAR ATHLETE WILL ASSIST BROOKS
Wearshing Shifted to Woodrow Wilson Hi; Lobley and O'Brien to Teach 
SIAS AT CRAMER JR. WITH MARY LADEWIG

By FRANK KOPESKY

The appointments to the city's educational staff announced by Samuel E. Fulton, president of the board of education, revealed last night that three former Camden High athletes are among the new appointees. 

The trio are Mitchell Mozelski, Edward Lobley and Edward "Pat" O'Brien. In addition to the appointment of the above, shifts in the physical education department for Camden's two senior high schools were also announced. 
Mozeleski, Lobley and O'Brien were stars of the first water while attending the local institution and also sparkled in college athletics. Mozeleski has been assigned to the physical education department at the
Camden Academic High School at Farnham Park and will assist Phillip R. Brooks. 

Brooks and Mozeleski will coach the various sports at the academic institution, with the latter more than likely taking over football and track and the former basketball and baseball. Brooks, however, will be in charge of the physical department. 

Mozeleski comes back to his alma mater after having had wide success in college sports and in coaching. "Mitch" attended William and Mary College and captained the football and basketball teams in his senior year, while also earning a letter in track. Following graduation from the Virginia college, Mozeleski coached at a Virginia military academy. 

Wearshing at Woodrow Wilson 

Mozeleski is well versed in football and is expected to turn out a formidable team this year at the academic institution. Still, he will have to find plenty of new material, as a number of the present gridders have transferred to the Woodrow Wilson Commercial High School, located at 32nd and Federal Streets. 

Grover "Worm" Wearshing, who assisted in the physical ed department at the local school during the past three years, and tutored the football and baseball teams, will take charge of that department and athletic teams at the Woodrow Wilson High School

As yet no assistant has been named for Wearshing, but within the next few weeks an announcement will be made by the board of education. 

Frank Sias, who was on the physical ed staff at the local high school and coached track, has been appointed as physical instructor at Cramer Junior High School and will be assisted by Mary Ladewig, another former Camden High grad, who has starred on the cinders for Temple University and Meadowbrook, holding a number of Middle Atlantic A. A. U. records. 

Lobley and O'Brien have been appointed as teachers in grammar schools. The former wlll teach at Fetters School, while the latter will tutor at Stevens School
Lobley and O'Brien Stars 

Lobley, who was a three-letterman at Camden High, graduated from the University of Pennsylvania and was on the varsity basketball team for three successive years, captaining the five in his senior year when the Red and Blue won the Eastern Intercollegiate championship. 

O'Brien, who was a star center at Camden High on the eleven, is a graduate of St. Joseph's College, and performed for three years at that position for the Philadelphia institution. While both have been assigned as teachers, it is likely that they will build up a foundation of grammar school athletics, teaching the youngsters the fundamentals of various sports. 

Fulton also announced last night that in dividing the present enrollment at Camden High into two separate institutions, that both will have the required number of male students to enter the Group 4 division in athletics. 

Schedules are already being drawn up for football for teams at both the academic and commercial arts schools. Fulton also stated that in all likelihood the elevens of both schools will meet on Thanksgiving Day to decide the supremacy of the city public school football title. However, this cannot be decided upon definitely until the alumni agrees to abandon their regular Thanksgiving Day game with the senior high team. .

Teachers Assigned to Woodrow Wilson
June 23, 1933

Woodrow Wilson High School Assignments

English: Iva L. Werner. Margueriet English, Joan C. Welsh, Charlotte V. Gravatt, Blanche R. Hammond, Helen X. Longeneckel, Joan G. Martin, N. Hope Warren, Edith R. Gandar.

Language; Evalina H. Mattson. 

Social Subjects: Ruth E. Carey, Frank L. Godshall, Malcolm M. Stock, Della L. Good, George W. Long. 

Science: Walter O. Ettinger. 

Mathematics: Harold C. Many.

Commercial: Ruth J. Hutton, Florence W. McKenty, Louise R. Cottle, Ethel M. Reeder, Minnie L. Stoughton, Miriam D. Barr, Bella Polivnick, Laura Krause, Jacob Kochinsky, Edward F. Walton, John C. Karshner, Kenneth A. Shultz, Josephine D. Estlow, Everettt B. Townsend, Jr, Theodore L. Soistmann, George T. Ney, C. Frances Vogeding. 

Art: Frances C. Hawkes. 

Shop: Harley E. Smith, A. Gabriel Ungerlieder, Thomas C. Marston. 

Physical Education and Health: W. Grover Wearshing, Helen H. Evaul, Katharine E. Newman.

Camden Courier-Post - February 1, 1938

BOARD Of EDUCATION SHIFTS 14 TEACHERS
Appoints 2 Instructors and Pensions 2 Others; Wilson Enrollment High

The Camden Board Education last night approved transfers of 14 teachers, the appointment of two new instructors and the retirement on pension of two others.

The board then adjourned until 11.45 a. m. today and it was announced the 1938-39 board will be organized at noon when Commissioner Mary W. Kobus is expected to be re-elected president.

When the report of the teachers committee making recommendations for appointments, transfers and retirements was read it was approved by unanimous vote and without comment.

Following the meeting Carlton W. Rowand explained that most of the transfers were made to meet emergencies in teaching classes at Woodrow Wilson High School, where more than 1500 students will be enrolled for the second semester, be ginning today.

Rowand explained that enrollment at the Wilson school is the highest in its history, due to many students taking up English and commercial courses instead of entering Camden senior high school, which will have an enrollment of approximately 1540 students, the smallest in several years.

List of Transfers

Transfers affecting teachers in junior high schools are: Louis E. Feinstein from Hatch Junior High School to commercial business organization, Wilson High School; Frank E. Sias, from Cramer Junior High to physical education, Wilson High; Jessie W. McMurtrie from Cramer Junior High School, to physical education, Wilson High; Wilton D. Greenway, from Cramer Junior High School to mathematics, Camden High; Elizabeth Dickinson, from Bonsall; to English, Cramer Junior High; Mrs. Mildred C. Simmons, from English to mathematics, Cramer Junior High; Miss Celia Boudov, from Hatch Junior High to departmental geography, science, and penmanship, Liberty School; Mrs. Elizabeth R. Myers assigned to English, Hatch Junior High;

Thelma L. Little transferred from, Grade 5 to Cooperative Departmental; Dudley school.

The following elementary school transfers, also effective today, are:

Beatrice W. Beideman from Starr to Sharp school; Mrs. Esther S. Finberg from Cramer to Broadway school; Dorothy M. Lippincott from Parkside to Dudley school; Mrs. Alva T. Corson from Washington to Broadway school, and Mary G. Cathell from Washington to Dudley school.

Teachers whose retirement was approved are Carolina W. Taylor, Grade 2, Broadway school, and William M. Thayer, mathematics [Camden] senior high school. Both teachers had resigned and applied for their pensions, the report read.

Appointments Made

Nathan Enten was appointed as physical education teacher in the Cramer school and Harry S. Manashil was appointed commercial teacher in Hatch school. Each will receive $1400, annually. The board also approved the appointment of Florence M. Dickinson as principal of Lincoln school at a salary of $2200 annually.

The assignment of Miss Grace Hankins as principal of Parkside school to succeed Miss Dickinson also was approved. Ethel Thegen was approved for appointment as assistant librarian at the Camden senior high school at a salary of $5.50 a day. All appointments are effective today.

To relieve overcrowded conditions among pupils the board approved the transfer of 7A and 7B classes from the Washington to the Cramer school.

The board vote to open a library in the Cramer school and Raymond G. Price, supervisor of building was instructed to provide, the necessary equipment.

A resolution of condolence upon the death of Ethel C. Wenderoth, for 19 years a teacher in the Broadway School was passed and secretary Albert Austermuhl was instructed to send a copy to members of the deceased teacher's family.

2 New Faces on Board

The board received and filed a letter from Mayor George E. Brunner in which he stated he had appointed Mrs. George W. Tash, Samuel T. French Jr. as new members and had re-appointed Robert Burk Johnson as a board member.

William B. Sullender, of the Tenth Ward, who was not re-appointed, was commended by the members for his services. E. George Aaron said he regretted the fact that Sullender was leaving as a member and wished him success. Others joined in this tribute.

Sullender in reply thanked the members for their co-operation during his term of office.

Woodrow Wilson High School
1957

Camden Courier-Post  - February 11, 1936

WOODROW WILSON HIGH SCHOOL

WOODROW WILSON HIGH SCHOOL at 3101 Federal Street in East Camden, originally was built as a junior high school. The school opened in that capacity by February of 1930. 

In June of 1933 Camden reorganized its schools. Woodrow Wilson became a high school, specializing in commercial and practical arts. The junior high school students were shifted to the Cramer school, which became a junior high schools, and the Garfield and Dudley Schools reabsorbed seventh grade students. 

The above picture was taken in 1934. The school sits opposite Dudley Grange Park, which for many years housed a branch of the Camden Public Library. 

Woodrow Wilson High School
1939

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to Enlarge

 

Camden Courier-Post - February 10, 1930

P. O. S. A. WILL PRESENT FLAG TO JUNIOR HIGH

A parade is being planned by the Patriotic Order of Sons of America for Washington's Birthday, when a flag will be presented to the new Woodrow Wilson Junior High School by Camp No. 25.

The parade will be formed at the Harry C. Sharp School, Thirty-second Street and Hayes Avenue, and proceed to the new school at Thirty-second and Federal Streets. George B. Cassidy, past district president, will be marshal of the parade.

The presentation will be made by Neal L. Jamerson, past state master of forms, and accepted by Samuel E. Fulton, president, on behalf of the board of education. Mayor Winfield S. Price will be among the speakers.

Camden Courier-Post - June 8, 1933

3 CAMDEN STUDENTS GET DEGREES AT N. Y. U.

Three Camden residents, including two school teachers, were among the 4.000 students graduated from New York University yesterday at the 101st commencement exercises at Ohio Field, University Heights, New York.

The Camden students are Miss May Marchant, 422 Linden Street, teacher at Woodrow Wilson Junior High School, Bachelor of Science degree in School of Education, Bella Polivnick, 1449 Ormond Avenue, teacher in Camden High School, Bachelor of Science degree in School of Education, and Charles E. Hutchinson, 1353 Park Boulevard, Bachelor of Science in Electrical Engineering, School of Engineering.

Camden Courier-Post - June 9, 1933

HIGH SCHOOLS HERE REVISED;
JUNIOR-SENIOR PLAN CUT OUT 
New System Gives Choice of Academic or Commercial and Arts Courses 
SAVES $500,000 ANNEX, RELIEVES CROWDING 
Hours Reduced; Study Programs Rebuilt; Omit Spanish; Music Optional

By FRANK SHERIDAN

Reorganization of Camden junior and senior high schools has been effected with the approval of the local and state boards of education.

By establishing the Camden Academic High School and Camden Commercial and Practical Arts High School the school population of the present Camden High School will be reduced 50 percent when the September terms begin, according to Dr. Leon N. Neulen, superintendent of schools. 

It also will reduce the student roster of all junior high schools even with the promotions of this month added. 

Saves $500,000 

"This plan will give Camden room for expansion for years to come in high school education and preclude the necessity of building the $500,000 annex to the senior high school, plans for which have been drawn at the cost of thousands of dollars," Dr. Neulen declares. 

"It will eliminate a number of studies and give the students more education in the more essential subjects. The hours of instruction will be reduced from 30 hours per week to 23. The state law's minimum is 19 hours."

Dr. Neulen points out that 2400 students are now registered in Camden High School and promotions from junior school this month would have added 700 more. Under the new plan 1500 will attend the Academic High School and 1300 the Commercial school. 

The balance will be redistributed back into the junior and seventh grade grammar schools. 

Wilson High Commercial 

The new plan will cause a general redistribution of pupils in East Camden because the Woodrow Wilson Junior High School will become the Commercial high. The present junior high pupils will be sent back to Cramer school, from which they originally were transferred. Students in the Garfield and Dudley Schools will take their seventh grade in those institutions instead of junior high. 

Camden Junior High School No. 1, which now hall 849 pupils, will have 730 next term, Hatch Junior High School has 1106 pupils now and will have 1127 next term. Woodrow Wilson Junior High School now has 970 pupils and will have 643 at the Cramer school

Four Courses at Academic High 

Dr. Neulen explained that the new Academic High School will teach four courses: College preparatory, college technical, normal preparatory and general. Students will be given four-year courses, in the first three mentioned courses and three years in the latter. Camden High is now a three-year school. 

That will mean the ninth, tenth, eleventh and twelfth grades will be taught in the college preparatory, college technical and normal preparatory and the tenth, eleventh and twelfth in the general course. 

The Commercial and Practical Arts High School will teach commercial and practical arts courses in three-year courses in the tenth, eleventh and twelfth. 

Practical arts will be taught exclusively to boys in the school because only 27 girls elected to take that course this year and they will be transferred to Academic in the Fall, Dr. Neulen explained. 

Four Years Latin; No Spanish 

The new plan provides for the teaching of general foreign languages but eliminates Spanish because of so few taking the subject. Latin will be taught four years, French three and German two. 

A general business course is included in the plan known as introductory business to be taught at the Commercial High. Students will start this course in the last junior high year. 
The practical arts course to be taught at Commercial will enable a student to continue manual training and shop begun in the junior years. The student may elect from automobile mechanics and electrical, print shop or woodworking. 

Art and Music Optional 

Art and music no longer will be compulsory under the new plan. Students in Academic will be taught music and art appreciation during the first two years and may discontinue those studies in their last two years. 

A complete business course has been mapped out for Commercial. 

The students are given elementary business practice in their ninth year. During their first year at Commercial High bookkeeping, typewriting and shorthand is added.

During the third and fourth year they will elect from three sequences to fit them for secretarial positions and general business. Sequence A provides for the continuation of shorthand and typewriting in the third year and office practice is added in the fourth. Sequence B in the third year teaches bookkeeping, business organization and marketing. Common law, bookkeeping and practice is added in the fourth year. Sequence C provides business organization, marketing, exchange and selling. Commercial art and advertising is included in the fourth year. 

As students advance through the Commercial course they may be transferred from one sequence to another. This will be guided by their adaptability or whether they desire to follow a secretarial or business career.

If students elect Sequence A they may have the option of bookkeeping or world history in the third year. Business organization may be taken instead of American history in the fourth year.

Camden Courier-Post - June 21, 1933

WILSON JUNIOR HIGH WILL GRADUATE 116 AT 2 TOMORROW 
87 Girls and 79 Boys Will Be 'Given Diplomas at Exercises 
STUDENTS TO SPEAK.

Diplomas will be presented at 2 p.m. tomorrow to 166 graduates at commencement exercises of Woodrow Wilson Junior High School, Thirty-third and Federal Streets. There are 87 girls and 79 boys graduating from the 9th grade. This school becomes Camden Commercial High School in the fall.

Three honor students will deliver addresses, They are Ernest Hartline, vocational; Elsie Knorr, commercial, and Rita Draper, college preparatory. A program will be given by the school orchestra. A solo wlll be given by Miriam Schuck. 

The graduates follow:

Leah Alder, Harris M. Ackerman, Maybelle Alcott, Carl Anderson, John T. Andrews, Regina Andrews, Jean Armstrong, Fred Balint, Raymond Banford, Margaret Becker, Elizabeth R. Berner, William C. Blessing, Joseph Blessinger, Jr., Jack Birbeck, Horace A. Blizzard Jr. 

Helen Bach, Kenneth Borman. Eva Mae Brinton, Helen V. Brown, Irving Buchanan, Jeanette Carson, Anna. May Casey, Mildred Chambers, Irene Cohen, Emma Creely, Robert Danaher, Russell Daniel, Madeline Danner.

Oliver Davis, Harry S. Derrickson, Samuel Doerr, Walter Doran, Rita Draper, Myrtle Drew, Harry Dunkleberger, John Dwyer, Joseph Edward Falana, William Fensch, Doris Fisher, R. Louise Fowler, Jack A. Gardner.

Bessie Gartmann, Morris Gaudet, Raymonda Gehret, Mary Genther, Linda M. Getz, Virginia Gideon, Sidney Goldberg, Virginia Grau, James Green, Chandler B. Grover, Stella L. Handleton, Harold E. Hansel, Alice Harker, Ernest Hartline, Mary Hartman.

Ralph M. Heidi, George Hicks, Edna Hoffman, George S. Hoffman, John Horn, Allen Howe, Earl Hoxworth, Harry Hubner, Samuel G. Hughes, Edward R. Hurtt, Frank Idell, Dorothy L. Ivory, Jane Jackson, Walter Jefferson. 

Anita Keenan, Harold Keller, Betty F. Ketrow, Pearl Kieffer, Ruth Kienzle, Susanna Kille, Ethel Kinsella, Elsie Knorr, Erica J, Koehler, Stanley Ksiazek, Ida LaMont, Alice Landenberger, 
Hilda Lee, John Lee. 

Katherine E. Lemberger, Charles Leon, Eugene Letts, Ethel J. Lengenfelter, Marie Loeffler, Elsie Lokan, Regina W. Loney, Ruth Longfellow, William MacKenzie, Agnes Madison, William E. Manns, Alan F. Marlor, Miriam Mattison, Veronica F. Mayer, Mary McAndrews, Joseph James McCormick, Robert S. McCormick.

James McFadden, Charles K. Megronigle, Robert G. Middleton, Edward F. Miller, Earl Mollenkopf, Richard Moore, Warren J. Marley. Lillian Morrell, John Morris, Howard Morrow, Erma Paulsen, Frances Peraria, Mary Pfeiffer, Paul Pharo, Ida Potts, William E. Powell, Benjamin P. Putnam. 

Arthur Raws, Jr., Helen Read, Dorothy Rolhmann, William Rhile, Marion P. Richard, Jeanne Roegner, Maurice Rosen, Kila E. Rue, Lillian Saccomanno, Dorothy Sattler, Ruth M. Saul, Violet Schenck, Margaret Schirmer, Jack Schiselbauer, Marion Schloendorn.

Albert J. Schoelkopf. Albert A. Schofield, A. Miriam Schuck, Eleanor Selfridge. Mary F. Senor, Bernice Sharp, Harold Shugart, Eleanor Smith, Ethel Smith, Robert Spagel, G. Arthur Spohn, John M. Sviben, William Swanson, Harriet Sweeten, Pauline Terry, Beatrice Mae Thompson, Frances T. Tischner.

Charles W. Townsend, Edmund Trimmell, John Tufnell, Marie Van Saun, Cecelia Walker, Donald Wark, Anna Watson, Gertrude Werner, George J. Wilson, Florence Winter, Edith Woods, Miome Zinn, Hazel Zondler, Bertram Zumeta.


Camden Courier-Post - June 23, 1933

Mitchell Mozeleski Is Assigned to Coaching 
LOCAL STAR ATHLETE WILL ASSIST BROOKS
Wearshing Shifted to Woodrow Wilson Hi; Lobley and O'Brien to Teach 
SIAS AT CRAMER JR. WITH MARY LADEWIG

By FRANK KOPESKY

The appointments to the city's educational staff announced by Samuel E. Fulton, president of the board of education, revealed last night that three former Camden High athletes are among the new appointees. 

The trio are Mitchell Mozelski, Edward Lobley and Edward "Pat" O'Brien. In addition to the appointment of the above, shifts in the physical education department for Camden's two senior high schools were also announced. 
Mozeleski, Lobley and O'Brien were stars of the first water while attending the local institution and also sparkled in college athletics. Mozeleski has been assigned to the physical education department at the
Camden Academic High School at Farnham Park and will assist Phillip R. Brooks. 

Brooks and Mozeleski will coach the various sports at the academic institution, with the latter more than likely taking over football and track and the former basketball and baseball. Brooks, however, will be in charge of the physical department. 

Mozeleski comes back to his alma mater after having had wide success in college sports and in coaching. "Mitch" attended William and Mary College and captained the football and basketball teams in his senior year, while also earning a letter in track. Following graduation from the Virginia college, Mozeleski coached at a Virginia military academy. 

Wearshing at Woodrow Wilson 

Mozeleski is well versed in football and is expected to turn out a formidable team this year at the academic institution. Still, he will have to find plenty of new material, as a number of the present gridders have transferred to the Woodrow Wilson Commercial High School, located at 32nd and Federal Streets. 

Grover "Worm" Wearshing, who assisted in the physical ed department at the local school during the past three years, and tutored the football and baseball teams, will take charge of that department and athletic teams at the Woodrow Wilson High School

As yet no assistant has been named for Wearshing, but within the next few weeks an announcement will be made by the board of education. 

Frank Sias, who was on the physical ed staff at the local high school and coached track, has been appointed as physical instructor at Cramer Junior High School and will be assisted by Mary Ladewig, another former Camden High grad, who has starred on the cinders for Temple University and Meadowbrook, holding a number of Middle Atlantic A. A. U. records. 

Lobley and O'Brien have been appointed as teachers in grammar schools. The former wlll teach at Fetters School, while the latter will tutor at Stevens School
Lobley and O'Brien Stars 

Lobley, who was a three-letterman at Camden High, graduated from the University of Pennsylvania and was on the varsity basketball team for three successive years, captaining the five in his senior year when the Red and Blue won the Eastern Intercollegiate championship. 

O'Brien, who was a star center at Camden High on the eleven, is a graduate of St. Joseph's College, and performed for three years at that position for the Philadelphia institution. While both have been assigned as teachers, it is likely that they will build up a foundation of grammar school athletics, teaching the youngsters the fundamentals of various sports. 

Fulton also announced last night that in dividing the present enrollment at Camden High into two separate institutions, that both will have the required number of male students to enter the Group 4 division in athletics. 

Schedules are already being drawn up for football for teams at both the academic and commercial arts schools. Fulton also stated that in all likelihood the elevens of both schools will meet on Thanksgiving Day to decide the supremacy of the city public school football title. However, this cannot be decided upon definitely until the alumni agrees to abandon their regular Thanksgiving Day game with the senior high team. .

Teachers Assigned to Woodrow Wilson
June 23, 1933

Woodrow Wilson High School Assignments

English: Iva L. Werner. Margueriet English, Joan C. Welsh, Charlotte V. Gravatt, Blanche R. Hammond, Helen X. Longeneckel, Joan G. Martin, N. Hope Warren, Edith R. Gandar.

Language; Evalina H. Mattson. 

Social Subjects: Ruth E. Carey, Frank L. Godshall, Malcolm M. Stock, Della L. Good, George W. Long. 

Science: Walter O. Ettinger. 

Mathematics: Harold C. Many.

Commercial: Ruth J. Hutton, Florence W. McKenty, Louise R. Cottle, Ethel M. Reeder, Minnie L. Stoughton, Miriam D. Barr, Bella Polivnick, Laura Krause, Jacob Kochinsky, Edward F. Walton, John C. Karshner, Kenneth A. Shultz, Josephine D. Estlow, Everettt B. Townsend, Jr, Theodore L. Soistmann, George T. Ney, C. Frances Vogeding. 

Art: Frances C. Hawkes. 

Shop: Harley E. Smith, A. Gabriel Ungerlieder, Thomas C. Marston. 

Physical Education and Health: W. Grover Wearshing, Helen H. Evaul, Katharine E. Newman.

Camden Courier-Post - February 1, 1938

BOARD Of EDUCATION SHIFTS 14 TEACHERS
Appoints 2 Instructors and Pensions 2 Others; Wilson Enrollment High

The Camden Board Education last night approved transfers of 14 teachers, the appointment of two new instructors and the retirement on pension of two others.

The board then adjourned until 11.45 a. m. today and it was announced the 1938-39 board will be organized at noon when Commissioner Mary W. Kobus is expected to be re-elected president.

When the report of the teachers committee making recommendations for appointments, transfers and retirements was read it was approved by unanimous vote and without comment.

Following the meeting Carlton W. Rowand explained that most of the transfers were made to meet emergencies in teaching classes at Woodrow Wilson High School, where more than 1500 students will be enrolled for the second semester, be ginning today.

Rowand explained that enrollment at the Wilson school is the highest in its history, due to many students taking up English and commercial courses instead of entering Camden senior high school, which will have an enrollment of approximately 1540 students, the smallest in several years.

List of Transfers

Transfers affecting teachers in junior high schools are: Louis E. Feinstein from Hatch Junior High School to commercial business organization, Wilson High School; Frank E. Sias, from Cramer Junior High to physical education, Wilson High; Jessie W. McMurtrie from Cramer Junior High School, to physical education, Wilson High; Wilton D. Greenway, from Cramer Junior High School to mathematics, Camden High; Elizabeth Dickinson, from Bonsall; to English, Cramer Junior High; Mrs. Mildred C. Simmons, from English to mathematics, Cramer Junior High; Miss Celia Boudov, from Hatch Junior High to departmental geography, science, and penmanship, Liberty School; Mrs. Elizabeth R. Myers assigned to English, Hatch Junior High;

Thelma L. Little transferred from, Grade 5 to Cooperative Departmental; Dudley school.

The following elementary school transfers, also effective today, are:

Beatrice W. Beideman from Starr to Sharp school; Mrs. Esther S. Finberg from Cramer to Broadway school; Dorothy M. Lippincott from Parkside to Dudley school; Mrs. Alva T. Corson from Washington to Broadway school, and Mary G. Cathell from Washington to Dudley school.

Teachers whose retirement was approved are Carolina W. Taylor, Grade 2, Broadway school, and William M. Thayer, mathematics [Camden] senior high school. Both teachers had resigned and applied for their pensions, the report read.

Appointments Made

Nathan Enten was appointed as physical education teacher in the Cramer school and Harry S. Manashil was appointed commercial teacher in Hatch school. Each will receive $1400, annually. The board also approved the appointment of Florence M. Dickinson as principal of Lincoln school at a salary of $2200 annually.

The assignment of Miss Grace Hankins as principal of Parkside school to succeed Miss Dickinson also was approved. Ethel Thegen was approved for appointment as assistant librarian at the Camden senior high school at a salary of $5.50 a day. All appointments are effective today.

To relieve overcrowded conditions among pupils the board approved the transfer of 7A and 7B classes from the Washington to the Cramer school.

The board vote to open a library in the Cramer school and Raymond G. Price, supervisor of building was instructed to provide, the necessary equipment.

A resolution of condolence upon the death of Ethel C. Wenderoth, for 19 years a teacher in the Broadway School was passed and secretary Albert Austermuhl was instructed to send a copy to members of the deceased teacher's family.

2 New Faces on Board

The board received and filed a letter from Mayor George E. Brunner in which he stated he had appointed Mrs. George W. Tash, Samuel T. French Jr. as new members and had re-appointed Robert Burk Johnson as a board member.

William B. Sullender, of the Tenth Ward, who was not re-appointed, was commended by the members for his services. E. George Aaron said he regretted the fact that Sullender was leaving as a member and wished him success. Others joined in this tribute.

Sullender in reply thanked the members for their co-operation during his term of office.

Camden Courier-Post - February 12, 1938

NAME STUDENT AIDES AT WOODROW WILSON
Association Groups, Girls' Sports Managers Are Appointed

Student Association committees for the new school term have been appointed recently at Woodrow Wilson High School. Managers of girls' sports also have been named for the Girls' Athletic Association at the school.

Members of the Student Association committees are:

Attendance—Irene Chonto, chairman; Anne Stasiewicz, Mary Marsh. Bulletin Board — Betty Chesshire, Ruth Calvert, Rosemary Straub. Welfare—Pearl Shepacarter. Athletic— Brewster Bragg, Joseph Bottalico, Harry Oldt, Joseph Maichlik, Harry King, Golda Harper, Elizabeth Nicktern, Jane Harford, Peggy Gleason, Isabella Cleary.

Social Dance — Martha Griffin, chairman; LeRoy Seeds, vice-chairman; Elva Hinkle, Dorothy Heston, Helen Summers, Ruth Calvert, DeLyle Harrigyle, Martha Zilg, Charles Grigley, Harry Howell, Frank DeJong, Albert Pierce, Longrotta, Robert Biehler.

Managers of girls' sports are Geraldine Kraut, volley ball; Florence Falkinberg, tumbling; Sylvia Rosenberg, quoits; Thelma Storm, swimming; Marian Converse, bowling; Georgina Osborne, statistical secretary. Badminton is being entered as another sport in the athletic association..

Camden Courier-Post - February 18, 1938

SENI0R COMMITTEES BUSY AT WILSON HI
Pin and Ring, Prom, Yearbook, Motto, and Color Groups Are Active 

Senior class committees have swung into action at Woodrow Wilson High School.

The finance and auditing committees pronounce everything in "ship-shape" order; the pin and ring committee has taken care of orders in a satisfactory manner, and the class motto and class color committee reports the" situation well in hand. 

With the class "Who's Who" due 'to make an appearance soon, the yearbook committee has leaped into prominence, Sharing the limelight is the prom committee. Although the date of the Senior Prom has been set, the committee refuses to divulge any definite information for a few weeks. 

Miss Florence W. McKenty is faculty adviser. Class officers are: President. Ted Lewin; Vice president, Helen Summers; Secretary, Martha Griffin, treasurer. James Magee. 

Finance Committee-Treasurer, James Magee; Sylvia Elder. Martha Zilz, Ida Bradley, Harry Parker, Herbert Richter. 

Auditing Committee-Chairman, Robert Schaal, Gaetonia Lalli, Doris Hart. 

Yearbook Commlttee-Chalrman, Fisher Weinhold, Eleanor Gibbs. Golda Harper. Lillian Merlino, Alfreda Mroz, Marion Richard, Betty Chesshlre, Sara Molotsky, Audrey Boyle, Dorothy Jones, Ida Layton, Marguerite Heritage, Alex Jaskolski, Robert Schaal, Delbert Banks, Arthur Lear. Jack Letzgus, Robert Montgomery, Herbert Rlchter, Willie Williams. 

Pin and Ring Committee-Chairman, Helen Lacy; Ella Campbell, Irene Chonto, Katherine Knust, Mae O'Donnell. Ruth Van Meter, Benjamin Barton, Frank Robbins. 

Senior Class Officers at Wilson 
HELEN SUMMERS JAMES MAGEE TED LEWIN

Officers and committees of the senior class at Woodrow Wilson High School are approaching the climax of their activities. Helen Summers is vice president of the class" Ted Lewin Is president and James Magee is treasurer. Martha Griffin is class secretary.  

Camden Courier-Post * February 25, 1938

Woodrow Wilson High School - Camden Catholic High School
Camden High School - Bob Olesiewicz - Ray Dixon - Dave Lewin
Ray Patton - Bob Boyd - Fred Ackerman - Arthur Blaker


Camden Courier-Post
September 1945


Camden Courier-Post * July 30, 1941

Joe Acquaro
1954

Woodrow Wilson High School
1957

Woodrow Wilson High School
as seen from Dudley Grange

Camden Courier-Post - May 19, 1964

Prominent Graduates of Woodrow Wilson High School
Alfred R. Piece Mike Rozier Art Still
     
     

Camden Courier-Post - November 21, 2004

25 years later, prep football game shootout resonates
 By
KEVIN CALLAHAN 

Although he would rise to the pinnacle of college football just four years later by winning the Heisman Trophy, Mike Rozier's last play for Woodrow Wilson High School was spent looking down in the dirt on the field that would later bear his name.

"I never saw anything like it before - it was like cowboys and Indians," Rozier said while standing near the 10-yard line where he hit the ground a quarter of a century ago.

It was 25 years ago Monday. It was Nov. 22, 1979. It was Thanksgiving Day.

And it was, perhaps, the most infamous moment in the history of South Jersey scholastic sports - the moment in the third quarter of the Woodrow Wilson-Camden football game when a shootout between rival motorcycle gangs left nine people with bullet wounds and sparked panic among many in the estimated crowd of 5,000 spectators.

"Most of the shooting was right over there," Rozier said, pointing to the northwest corner of the stadium with one hand and holding the Heisman Trophy, awarded to the outstanding college football player in the country, with the other. "I have pictures, you can see gun smoke, cops have their guns out."

Camden vs. Woodrow Wilson is regarded as one of the best rivalries in South Jersey sports. The annual Thanksgiving Day football game traditionally draws several thousand spectators as alumni, family and friends of both programs gather to reminisce and watch the two teams battle for city bragging rights.

The teams have played every Thanksgiving Day since 1979 without incident. This year's game will be Thursday at Camden's home field at Farnham Park.

The teams have played 73 times in a series that began in 1931. Camden holds a 44-26-3 advantage.

"Camden-Wilson was always a great game," said former Camden Athletics Director Wally MacPherson, who was the Panthers' AD in 1979 and was at the game. "That (shootout) didn't have anything to do with the two schools or the teams."

Diving on his belly

Nineteen people were injured when a series of fights between members of the Wheels of Soul and Ghetto Riders motorcycle gangs escalated to gunplay at around 12:50 p.m. - midway through the third period of the football game.

Rozier remembers diving on his belly on the field, along with most other players. He remembers the confusion and panic on the part of thousands of spectators, many of whom charged across the field, away from the commotion that was behind the home stands at the East Camden school.

He also remembers continuing his football career - and being asked about the shootout every step of the way. "That shooting went nationwide," Rozier said. "When I got to school (at the University of Nebraska), people didn't believe me. I had a scrapbook, so I showed it to them and then they believed me."

Memorable game

Rozier's cousin, Tara Dixon, who had graduated from Camden Catholic the previous May, was on the home sidelines that day before leaving the game with a friend.

"I decided to walk to Mike's mom's on 27th Street, then the shooting began," Dixon said. "It was by the grace of God that I went to Aunt Bea's."

MacPherson said it was the most memorable game he ever attended, even though he admitted it was for the wrong reasons.

After Rozier won the Heisman Trophy and was a first-round draft pick by both the United States Football League and National Football League, Woodrow Wilson named its home field "Mike Rozier Field."

The 1979 game was stopped with Camden leading 14-6 with 5:05 left in the third quarter. The game was never finished.

"Sometimes I get together with the guys and we sit back and talk about that game, someone always brings it up," said Rozier, who lives in in the Sicklerville section of Winslow. "I remember all the gun smoke and me jumping on the ground and coaches trying to get me out of there."

Gang shootout

According to police accounts, the motorcycle gangs arrived around halftime, each coming from different entrances. They walked toward each other and started fighting. Then the shots began to fill the air at 12:50 p.m.

Camden police officers joined in the gunfire as hundreds of fans at the stadium on 31st and Federal streets began to flee. Police estimated that as many as 25 shots were fired.

"I had no idea whatsoever what was going on," MacPherson said. "I heard it, luckily I was down the other end of the field."

The initial shots were fired between the two motorcycle gangs, according to police. Police were uncertain why the gangs were feuding, although it was believed the showdown erupted as a result of Ghetto Riders breaking away from the Wheels of Soul gang but continuing to wear their "colors."

"It had nothing to do with either school," MacPherson said.

Injuries and arrests

Three Camden men were left in critical condition with bullet wounds, although they survived. Five others, including a Camden woman and her young son, were hit by gunfire and were hospitalized and later released.

Authorities confiscated six handguns while 37 gang members were arrested and charged with two counts each of aggravated assault. Seven of those arrested suffered gunshot wounds. No police were injured.

According to New Jersey State Police spokesman Sgt. Kevin Rehmann, the Wheels of Soul continues to operate as a motorcycle club out of Camden.

MacPherson said there were never any discussions to continue the game another day. The memories linger

But that doesn't mean there still isn't talk about the Thanksgiving Day game between Woodrow Wilson and Camden in 1979. "We all talk about it, all the guys I played ball with back in the day, we all talk about it," Rozier said.

Rozier plans to be back for the big game on Thanksgiving Day.

"Thanksgiving game, everybody comes back, guys from way back in the '70s and '60s come back for the Camden-Wilson game," Rozier said. "Everyone gathers around, Camden High and Wilson, now we are all buddies. Last year we had a cookout right there."

Standing in the same spot he hit the dirt 25 years ago, Rozier pointed to the northwest corner of the stadium. That's where the shooting began.

Woodrow Wilson High School Official Website

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