CAMDEN COUNTY
VOCATIONAL & TECHNICAL SCHOOL
Browning Road, Pennsauken NJ

Originally known simply as the Camden County Vocational School, this institution has provided a practical alternative to the standard high school curriculum to Camden city and county youth since the late 1920s. 

Among other items below you will find in a somewhat reformatted version the graduation issue of the Vocationalite, which I believe was the school newspaper, from June of 1930. Be sure to click on the photographs for enlarged views.

If you know anyone depicted here or have any comments, corrections, or additions that you would like to see made, please e-mail me.

Phil Cohen

 

CAMDEN COUNTY
VOCATIONALITE

GRADUATION NUMBER

FRONT ENTRANCE - BROWNING ROAD

{ June, Nineteen Hundred and Thirty }

CAMDEN COUNTY VOCATIONAL SCHOOL
PENNSAUKEN TOWNSHIP. N.J.

 

Dedication

TO OUR first graduates, upon whom rests the responsibility of justifying vocational education to the people of Camden County, this issue is dedicated by their fellow students, with the sincere wish that these graduates may not only realize their most cherished ambitions, but that they may also be enriched with a vision of service to mankind.

 

 

June 1930       CAMDEN COUNTY VOCATIONALITE       Page 3

THE V O C A T I O N AL I T E

Vol. 2  JUNE  No. 5

Exchange

Published from October to June, by the students of the Camden County Vocational School, Pennsauken Township, N. J. Office of Publication, Camden County Vocational School, Merchantville, N. J.

EDITORIAL BOARD

CALVIN A. LEEDS . . . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .Editor
SARAH R. KERCHER . . . . . . . . .. . . . . . .
Assistant Editor
CARL SIMMONS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .
.Make-up Editor
THOMAS W. RUNGE .. .. . . . . . . . . . . .
.Exchange Editor
JOSEPH J. SHAW.........................................
.Sport Editor

Board of Education

BURLEIGH B. DRAPER
President

WILLIAM A. GORMLEY
Vice-President

ALBERT M. BEAN
County Superintendent of Schools

HARRY L. MALONEY
MELBOURNE F. MIDDLETON

MUNRO S. COULTER
Secretary

THEODORE THOMPSON
Treasurer

EDWARD T. CURRY
Solicitor

School Faculty

JOSEPH M. HALL
Director

JOHN S. RAY
Assistant Director

RAYMOND C. BALL
English

EDWARD H. BOHN
Science

ELSIE M. F. BORDEN
Civics

MINNETTE H. CALLAHAN
Librarian

BENJAMIN I. CORSON
Mathematics

P. RICHARD CUMMINS
Electrical Wiring

MAE E. DARNELL
Nurse

LAWRENCE D. FORBES
Director of Athletics

FRANK W. HERRINGTON
Automobile Mechanics

ALICE S. KEELER
Cafeteria

WALTER A. KNITTLE
History

 

EDWARD H. MEYERS
Aero-Mechanics

WILLIAM J. MORROW
Printing

CARL L. PACKARD
Woodworking

DAVID J. RODGERS
Machine Shop and
Mathematics

MARGUERITE C. RUDDEROW
English

GEORGE J. SCHEERS
Architectural Drafting .

CHARLES C. SHEPPARD
Chemistry

HARRY SLATER
Plumbing

HAROLD SPECTOR
Assistant in Floriculture

ERNEST G. STRANG
Painting

JOSEPH STUTZ
Machine Shop

GEORGE H. TAYLOR
Machine Drafting

HARRY O. YATES
Floriculture

The Vocationalite staff wishes to extend thanks to the following school newspapers which have faithfully maintained their exchange column; and in so doing have accomplished much toward developing a spirit of cooperation among the schools.

We wish to be kept permanently on the mailing list of each of these splendid publications.

School Spirit, David Hale Fanning Trade School, Worcester, Mass.

The Hawk, Pennsauken Jr. High School, Pennsauken, N. J.

The Evening School News, Public Evening School, Dallas, Texas.

Cleveland Jr. Journal, Cleveland Jr. High School, Newark, N. J.

Curtin Jr. Citizen, Curtin Jr. High School, Williamsport, Pa.

Advance, State Home for Boys, Jamesburg N.J.

Progress, Boys Vocational School, New Brunswick, N. J.

The Vocational Messenger, Industrial High School, Albany, New York

News and Notes, Vocational School, Bayonne, N.J.

Brewster Vocational, Brewster Vocational School, Tampa, Florida.

Vocational News, Boys Vocational School, Newark, N. J.

Producer, Boys Vocational School, Atlantic City, N. J.

The Worker, Boys Vocational School, Newark, N. J.

The Vocall, Boys Vocational School, Elizabeth, N.J.

Hatchet, Hatch Jr. High School, Camden, N. J.

Green and White News, Florence Ave., Jr. High School, Irvington, N. J. 


"He who hath a trade, hath an estate" Franklin

 

Page 4       CAMDEN COUNTY VOCATIONALITE       June 1930

Two New Courses Next Term

When the school opens next fall there will be two new courses added, Radio Mechanics and Oxyacetylene Welding. These will bring the enrollment up to six hundred boys.

The positions open for skilled radio mechanics in this section warranted the addition of this course to the trades of the school. Dr. Haigas, chief Radio research engineer of the R.C.A -Victor Corporation, and Jack Hill, of the Federal Radio Company, of Camden, were consulted. Both men were enthusiastic about the course and have consented to act on the advisory committee of this course.

The daily curriculum of the students of the radio course will include three hours of shop work, consisting of radio assembly, testing, inspection, adjusting, trouble shooting and installation. The boys will also receive training in the theory of electricity, blue print reading, applicable mathematics, english, history, civics and physical training.

The purpose of this course is to train boys for the field of radio sales and service and the manufacturing field where they will do plant assembling, inspection work, trouble shooting, repair, etc.

The instructor of the course will be Henry A. Crissey, Jr., formerly with the R.C.A.-Victor Corporation, and at present, local representative for the Greybar Electrical Company.

The other course, that of Oxyacetylene Welding will include instruction in the welding of sheet metal and tubes for airplane framework. The U. S. Department of Commerce requires that all airplane welding, including repair work and new construction, be done by licensed mechanics. Students who complete this course will be prepared to take the examination for a government license and will be in a very advantageous position to secure employment.

Since welding requires close attention for considerable periods of time, boys applying for this course should have good eyesight.

This course is not recommended for boys under sixteen years of age.

These two courses will be given both in the night and day school.



Conowingo

 

In 1926, Conowingo was a quaint little town of about two hundred inhabitants, on the Baltimore Pike, in Cecil County, Maryland, near the shore of the Suscpehanna River. Today, a lake covering an area of about fourteen square miles hides all trace of the little town, and two miles down the river is the great dam and power 

house which turns the water of the Susquehanna into electric energy. This hurdles seventy-four miles through the air over a steel tower transmission line to Philadelphia.

The present hydro-electric development at Conowingo is not the Susquehanna's first use for power. As early as 1882, a flint mill located within a mile of the site of the present plant, used water power, as did a paper mill later. The Conowingo Hydro-Electric Project is an outstanding achievement in electric power development. The speed of its construction is without parallel in the history of projects of similar size. Construction was started on March 8, 1926 and on March 8, 1928, two years later, the first units were placed in regular operation.

From the standpoint of installed capacity Conowingo is the second largest hydro- electric development in the United States. Niagara Falls is the largest with a capacity of 425,000 h.p.

The delivery of the energy from the hydroelectric plant at Conowingo to Philadelphia is a great undertaking. This has been accomplished by means of two steel tower transmission lines operating at 220,000 volts, each line consisting of three aluminum cables (with steel core) of approximately one inch or 750,000 circular mils in diameter and each capable of transmitting the entire output of the initial installation without any noticable effect on the voltage received by the customers in Philadelphia. 

This is an important factor in the reliability of Conowingo power service because automatic protective equipment will isolate a defect in one circuit while the other circuit remains available to transmit the entire load. An unusual feature of the design of the spillway is the overhanging crest which is surmounted by fifty movable steel gates by which the reservoir level is maintained constant. 

These gates each weigh forty-two tons and measure twenty-two and a half feet high by forty-one feet wide. Another interesting feature of the plant is that it is seven stories high,, five being below the level of the reservoir and two above. The generators and water wheels from the standpoint of physical dimensions are the largest ever built. Each main generator is approximately thirty-eight feet in diameter and weighs over 500 tons. The total output of the plant is 270,000 watts. With this power we could light enough 300 watt lamps, placed 200 feet apart to go around the world one and one third times.

ALBERT SCHULZ

Extract from the booklet "Conowingo Hydro-
Electric Development"

This operation was visited by the members of the Electric Shop.

June 1930       CAMDEN COUNTY VOCATIONALITE       Page 5

Furniture

There are many people who think that the woodworking industry is on the ebb, but they are sadly mistaken. Some feel that metal furniture is coming more into style and putting the woodwork out, but they are also mistaken. Who would want to go into a home where all the furniture was made of metal, and the chairs were uncomfortable ? Perhaps in offices there may be seen large amounts of metal desks and furniture. They are all right for an office, but when it comes to furnishing a home what could be more beautiful than a house full of wooden furniture?
     In all branches of work or building in the world, wood plays a very important part. In any

country wood is used more than any other material.
     When a piece of metal furniture gets a dent from something hitting it, or a kick, it can never be made to look the same as new again, while if a wooden desk should get the same knock or dent, it can be easily sandpapered or planed down to look like new again.
      Wood is strong and can be relied upon to do great things. It has always been a great material, and always will be. The only thing needed is more skilled labor and this school is turning out some of the boys whose skill will be known to all manufacturers before long.

ROBERT LENT, Wood (A)

STAFF

Seated from lef t to right—JOSEPH SHAW, Sport Editor; CALVIN LEEDS, Editor; THOMAS RUNGE, Exchange Editor.
Standing—
RICHARD MASKA, Make-up Editor; SARA KERCHER, Assistant Editor.

GRADUATES OF NINETEEN HUNDRED AND THIRTY

READING FROM LEFT TO RIGHT AND FROM TOP ROW DOWN.

Fourth Row—WILLIAM SAGE, ARTHUR LEE, WALTER HAAS, WALTER TODD, HENRY EVERING, CHARLES SHOWELL, JOSEPH SILVERMAN, JOSEPH KANZLER, HOWARD MEARS, AND ERNEST HEGGAN.

Third Row—WILLIAM HERITAGE, CALVIN LEEDS, HENRY HANSEN, RICHARD WILLINGMYRE, ROBERT DERRICKSON, HAROLD ROBINSON, WILLIAM KILMARTIN, RALPH HUSTED, LOUIS CICCOTELLO AND LUTHER BRETTHAUER.

Second Row—JOHN WEIR, GILBERT ESHER, RONALD SENSEMAN, RICHARD SMITH, THOMAS RUNGE, CECIL PICOU, FRANK PANDEN, JOHN LOFLAND AND HARRY COREY.

First Rozv—ILDO PASQUALINE, EDWARD GONTARSKI, MINAR PIERCE, MARGARET BAUMAN, ROBERT WRAY, HAROLD WALLACE AND THOMAS NEILD. 

June 1930       CAMDEN COUNTY VOCATIONALITE       Page 7

Do You Know

That no member of the New York Giants Baseball team was born in New York City or lives there. 
      That almost any Pullman porter can tell at a glance after looking at your feet who manufactured your shoes.
      That mice sing like the faint twittering of a canary.
      That the only animal with four knees is the elephant.
      That Shakespeare used slang expressions in his works. "Be Yourself" and also "It's a riot!"
      That there isn't a trolley car in Aiken, S. C. More power to hikers.
      That a terrier is a better mouser than a pussy cat.
      That a half dollar and a piece of paper of the same size fall at equal speeds. (This one is a safe bet.)
      That you cannot count up to fifty million in a life time. 
      That it costs more to maintain a hat than to buy one.
      That the plumbers have been digging a manhole for an education.
      That there is such a thing as a square ring. The boxing ring.

 

Landing Gear of the Aircraft

The landing gear is the understructure which supports the weight of an aircraft when in contact with the surface of the land or water, and reduces the shock on landing. There are five common types of landing gears. They are the boat type and float type which are used for landing on the water. The skid type and wheel type are used for landing on the land. The ski type is used to land on snow or ice. 
         The main support on the float type is the float which is a completely enclosed water- tight structure attached to the fuselage. The main support on the boat type is a water-tight structure, which usually has the form of a boat. It also accommodates the passengers and crew. Both of these types have a small float to support the weight of the tail and also a small float on the tip of each wing to keep the wing from coming in contact with the water.
          The wheel type of landing gear is furnished with two wheels for the main supports of the plane. The wheels are made of metal with wire spokes, and are fitted with rubber balloon tires.       There is a small wheel to support the tail.
           The ski type is fitted with two large skis which are made of wood. They are bent upward on the front end. There is a small ski at the rear of the plane to support the tail.

HENRY FLURY

GRADUATES OF NINETEEN HUNDRED AND THIRTY

READING FROM LEFT TO RIGHT AND FROM TOP ROW DOWN.

Fourth Row—FRANK STAGLIANO, ZYGGY KUCCYNSKI, ERWIN JENSEN, ROBERT PEDRICK, DAVID HYMAN, GEORGE ULMER, MORGAN HARRISON, CONRAD MAURER, JENNINGS TREADWAY AND ROBERT LENT. 

Third Row to top (I. to r.)—WALTER ELLIS, RAYMOND JONES, ROBERT NAGLE, LEONARD WALINSKI, EDWIN YEAGER, EGBERT WRIGHT, LEONARD BROWN, HUBBARD MAGOWAN AND WILLIAM BOWEN.

Second Row—EDWARD LULEVITCH, EDWIN DECKER, RICHARD MASKA, LOUIS BOBO, ANTHONY DZIERZYNSKI, IRVING HARPER, WILLIAM BAUER AND CLARENCE RECKARD.

First Row—STANLEY ZUZGA, DANIEL ERRICHETTI, THOMAS BEZICH, ALFRED EIBELL, JOSEPH FIELIS, LOUIS LEISLING, JAMES HUSTED AND DANIEL RUDINOFF.

June 1930       CAMDEN COUNTY VOCATIONALITE       Page 9

"Contacts" from the Aero Class

Before the season ends we expect to have a Liberty twelve-cylinder motor running in our engine room. For about two months, two of the boys have been working on the control and three other boys are busy on the engine. We have the motors up on the mount and the control is working so well, we are nearly ready to go.
      Sam Fox and John McElvarr found chicken feathers in a motor.
      Mr. Meyers is going to start a Glider Club. Membership is open to the teachers and airplane mechanic students.
      Edward Toole and Edward Klutowski have been working on our observation sea plane.
      We expect to get many outside jobs to repair, overhaul and test next term. Pilot Shank, of Central Airport has given us the job of overhauling a Curtiss C-6, six cylinder water cooled motor.
     The Aero-Mechanics course is now quite complete due to the number of new engines which we have acquired. We have received twelve rotary engines, two fuselages, two sets of wings and various other parts. This gives the student a wider range of work and knowledge of aviation.
     Scharff, Steelman and Rapp are cleaning a fuselage of a "Jenny. This plane was inspected September 1, 1918, and probably served in the war.

This "Racket" Idea

The great novel by Webster gives as the definition of racket, a loud noise or an oval-shaped bat used in the game of tennis. 
      The modern world has expanded this definition until racket means the business, trade or profession you are in. This may seem funny to you to think of yourself as being educated to go into a racket. Think of the printing racket, the chemistry racket, or by chance, the cafeteria racket. Now the part which has not been officially finished is the idea of admitting this new word racket into the better English language.
      Racket! A noise. The origin for this name
may be traced to Chicago where the gangsters were called racketeers because of the noise they made when they were shooting up the town. This name gradually came into the eyes of the public who used it as a matter of course for any business trade or profession. The repetition of the word made its use for other things natural. 
     This word and its modern use will probably drift into infinity the same as all other popular hobbies of the public. The Blackbottom, the Charleston, the shifter pins and other odd ideas of the public have gradually stepped into the background for other things.
       New reforms are always under the process of becoming prominent. There is the possibility that this will stay while the others have faded.

LETTERMEN OF NINETEEN HUNDRED TWENTY-NINE AND THIRTY
READING FROM LEFT TO RIGHT AND FROM TOP ROW DOWN.

Fourth Row—CARROLL TURNER, ROBERT PEDRICK, STANLEY ROWAND, CECIL PICOU, THOMAS RUNGE, EDWARD GONTARSKI AND ROBERT WRAY.

Third Row—CALVIN LEEDS, WALTER HAAS, DANIEL THOMPSON, JOSEPH FIELIS, HUBBARD MAGOWAN, JOSEPH SHAW, AND ROBERT CHANCE.

Second Row—MORGAN HARRISON, ILDO PASQUALINE, EDWIN YEAGER, HAROLD STEELMAN, FRANK PANDEN AND JOSEPH GRUBER.

First Row—STANLEY ZUZGA, JOHN BYRD, CHARLES HOLLOPETER, MINAR PIERCE, PETER LACOVERA AND HAROLD WALLACE.

June 1930       CAMDEN COUNTY VOCATIONALITE       Page 11

Lettermen 1929-1930

Since the Camden County Vocational School opened on October 15, 1928, we have participated in three major sports, football, basketball and swimming.

Harold "Teen" Steelman has received the most letters, five in number, one for football, two for basketball and two for swimming. 

The following boys have received letters during the course of two years:

Aero (A)
     Edwin Callopy, football

Aero (B)
      Charles Hollopeter, football
      Peter Lacovara, basketball

Auto Mechanics (A)
      Wallace Guetens, football
      Robert Wray, football
      Frank Panden, basketball
      Harold Wallace, football and basketball

Architectural Drafting
      Carrol Turner, basketball

Chemistry
      John Byrd, football

Electric (A)
     Robert Chance, swimming
     Robert Pedrick, swimming
     Joseph Gruber, football
     Morgan Harrison, football and swimming
     Hubbard Magowan, basketball
     Daniel Thompson, basketball and swimming

Floriculture
      Joseph Shearer, football

Machine Shop (B)
      Joseph Fielis, football
      Joseph Matera, football
      Stanley Zuzga, football and basketball

Machine Drafting
      Edward Gontarski, football
      Thomas Runge, football
      Calvin Leeds, football and swimming
      Minar Pierce, football and basketball
      Thomas Pooley, football and swimming
       Harold Steelman, football, basketball and swimming

Painting (A)
       Joseph Shaw, football

Plumbing
       Joseph Drew, football
       Walter Haas, football
       Cecil Picou, football

Woodworking (A)
       Stanley Rowand, football

Woodworking (B)
       Edwin Yeager, football

Page 12       CAMDEN COUNTY VOCATIONALITE       June 1930

Football Prospects Good

Our Red and White football squad is looking forward to a successful season next fall, when they will compete in their second year of scholastic football.
      Six lettermen are expected to return and also several substitutes who showed up well last year and "hopeful" new material.
      The squad will sorely miss the services of Captain Harold Wallace, Tom Runge, Morgan "Bud" Harrison, Stanley Rowand, Joe Gruber, Edward Gontarski, Cecil Picou, Stan Zuzga and Edward Yeager, who will graduate, and Joe Matera, Joe Drew, Joe Shearer and "Bud" Callopy, who have left school.
      The remaining lettermen are Joe Shaw, John Byrd, Charles Hollopeter, Tom Pooley, Harold Steelman and Wallace Guetens. Al Pohl, Edward Haines, Joe Lydon and several other substitutes who saw action last year are expected to make the varsity.
      Our local gridiron is in good condition and we have arranged a nine-game schedule. Four games are away, two home and we have three open dates.
      The complete schedule is as follows:

September 26 Gloucester High, home 
October 4 Audubon High, away
October 10 open, home
October 17 Merchantville High, away
October 24 Riverside High, home
October 31 open, home
November 7 Hammonton High, away
November 14 open, home
November 22 Atlantic City Vocational, away

Election of A. A. Officials

On Tuesday May 2oth, an election was sponsored by the civics department for the purpose of electing officials for the coining year. 
     The winners of this election are as follows:

Harold Wallace, Auto (A), President
Joseph Packard, Arch. Draft., Vice-President
Robert Spratt, Paint (A), Secretary
Stanley Rowand, Wood (A), Treasurer

The Constitution, as printed in the March issue of this paper, was adopted by a large majority.

The Election Board was as follows:

John Lofland, of Chemistry; Thomas McKendry, of Machine Shop (C) ; Robert Lear, of Aero (A) ; Daniel Thompson, of Electrical (A), with Edward Gontarski, of Machine Drafting, as Judge of Elections.

"Sparks" from the Electric Shop

Gabreana and Lamon have been winding tiny armatures on ten cent motors brought in by Treadaway.
     The (A) class took two of Trapnells valuable skein wound coils and threw them in the waste can. They thought the coils were scrap wire.
    Harry Graham has been learning the principle of a cheap vacuum cleaner motor.
     MacArthur and Jaus have been overhauling a welder for the welding shop.
     Scarborough is working on an induction motor.
     Cooper and Jackson have been general cleanup men in the shop for several days for putting on a boxing bout without permission.
     Nagle was imitating a loud speaker so Mr. Cummins changed his job.
     Due to arguments over our highly valued tin shears, Mr. Cummins has put Charles Cooper, Robert Jackson and Stephen Walinski to work on stamping the words "Electric Shop" on all the tools.
     All the boys in the Electric Shop who ride on the Clementon trolley are jealous of Jake Dairs because all the girls sit near him on the car.
     During the last month Reid has been trying to get a small generator running. After a few weeks of working on it, he came to the conclusion it was no good.
     Francis Plot and Patrick McHugh have been running a ground wire through the house which the Wood Shop made. 
     R. Jackson and K. Snuffin have been making braces for Mr. Bonn's room.

How Chemists Help Humanity

Chemists have proved a salvation to humanity since the early days of the Egyptians. They explained the workings of the stars, produced perfumes and dyes famous even today. They also had a secret method of embalming which has won admiration. They experimented with herbs and other substances to produce medicines. 

This work has been going on for thousands of years. Fifty years ago a chemist illuminated the world by inventing an incandescent electric light. Now all industries are linked with Chemistry. We would not be able to live without Chemists. They made it possible to purify the water we drink, produce medicines that heal almost every disease. They can make dyes of every color of the rainbow from coal-tar make rayon silk from wood and many other important things.

R. WILLINGMYRE, Chemistry

June 1930       CAMDEN COUNTY VOCATIONALITE       Page 13

Right Off the Press

Linn Youtz, one of our best pressmen, is now setting up 25 receipts to be run off on the 'pony press'.
     The majority of the (B) class members are helping to set up and run a job for the Haddonfield police. This job consists of several booklets which contain the laws of arrest, state crimes and the meaning of words used by policemen.
      John Townsend has just left school and is working as an apprentice at the Franklin Printing Company, Philadelphia.
     Irwin Jensen and Eugene Zalewski have been working on the time reports for next term.
     Ed. Decker, the vertical pressman, is running off the certificates for the graduating class of 1930.
     Charles Uhland and ''Reds" Ferguson are working on the large job press.
     Charles Fritts has accepted a job with the Parkway Baking Company.
     Tommy Boyle is working on a job for Miss Rudderow.
     Clarence Reckard, Print (B), is back in the shop after a week's experience in industry. He still claims it is easier to go to school than work.
     Albert Snyder keeps Mr. Morrow's feet awake with "Rudy Vallee's Crooning."
     Charles Yatzus has been very busy running a job off for Lakeland Hospital.
     Anthony Colavito has a job as a vertical pressman in Philadelphia.
     We received 100% for best kept shop during the week of May 3.
     Our 1929-30 Championship Basketball Banner is now in our shop.
     There are two fellows working at the same plant; they are Edward Brimfield and Carl Simmons.

Inter-Class Baseball

As most of you know, Aero (A) and Electric (A), are the two remaining opponents out for the inter-class baseball banner. Aero (A) has a good team with Kling as their captain, Hess and Lodge as sure hitters, Dobbins as a pitcher and a whole class in back of them saying, "They can't be beat."

Still let us have a look at Electric (A) with Wright as their captain and pitcher. For batters Harrison, Fairbanks and Burke come out on top with a good many hits. Each team has won three games. You are probably wondering what became of the old champs, Auto (A). Well, they lost to Aero (B) in their first game.

JOHN F. REESE

Attendance Quotas

The number of students permitted to enter the Camden County Vocational School from the various Camden County districts is becoming larger each year. Next year's enrollment will show quite an increase over last year's. The new quotas for each district are as follows:

Audubon ..........

21

Laurel Springs

3

Barrington .......

6

Lawnside

4

Bellmawr . . . . . . . . .

3

Lindenwold Boro

7

Berlin Boro ......

6

Magnolia

4

Berlin Twp. . . . . . .

5

Merchantville

7

Brooklawn ... ...

5

Mount Ephraim

6

Camden . . . . . . . . . .

256

Oaklyn

8

Clementon Boro .. .

7

Pennsauken

46

Collingswood .....

26

Pine Hill Boro

3

Chesilhurst . . . . . . .

1

Pine Valley Boro

0

Delaware . . . . . . . . .

16

Runnemede

6

Gibbsboro . . . . . . . .

2

Somerdale Boro

4

Gloucester City . . . .

27

Stratford

2

Gloucester Twp. ...

15

Voorhees

4

Haddonfield . . . . . . .

20

Waterford

8

Haddon Heights ...

11

Winslow

16

Haddon Twp. .....

17

Woodlynne

7
Hi-Nella Boro 0

"Chips" from the Wood Shop

William Van Istendal has finished his smoking cabinet.
      Walter Petryk made an oak bench for the office.
      Miller and Valente are going around the different shops replacing the broken floor boards.
      Bob Lent has made a model boat.
      Mr. Packard, our instructor, took all the graduates and first year boys who were over 16 years of age to the R.C.A.-Victor. 
     All of the fellows are having a turn at the lathe. There are 40 drafting stools, 40 face plates and 140 legs to be completed by the close of school.
      He's just arrived! Who ? Detective Bush. He came to visit the school after being absent for over two months. Bush has been ill, but he will be back next September.
      Harry Wall made the pattern of the stool legs for the drafting class.
      Charles Hyder has nearly completed his two wardrobes.
      Yeager is the only letter man in Wood (B).
      Walinski has finished his utility cabinet.
      Stockdale and Waller have been repairing ladders for Mr. Strang's department.
      Boys from both sections of the Wood Shopare building a squad room for the school. This room is situated between the pool and the showers.
      Loges and Kirsche are building two wheel barrows.
      Shuts has just finished making a smoking and magazine cabinet.

Page 14       CAMDEN COUNTY VOCATIONALITE       June 1930

Wee Drops of Scotch

Have you heard of the Scotch policeman who shows his badge when they pass the collection plate at church ? 
     Guess the nationality of the man who put up
two mail boxes so he would get more mail. 
    
Now they are saying that the glider is a Scotch invention.
      Then there is the Scotchman who throws his whoopee parties at the penny arcade.
      Not to mention the Scotchman who sent his fiancee moth balls for her hope chest.
      And the Scot who married the tattooed hula dancer so he could see the movies for nothing.
      And last but not least is the Scotchman who visits the Zoo and throws empty peanut shells to the animals.

J. SHAW

Blowouts from Auto Shop

Mohr—Is troubled with sleeping sickness in English class especially.
      Heggan—The most bashful boy in the class.
      Our class has a quartet, believe it or not.
      Five boys in our class are going to graduate.
      Showell is so popular with the girls that they call him up in school.
      Wanzer is the assistant math teacher in room 101.
      Garrigues is always chewing gum and blowing bubbles. Why?
      Kilmartin—the class comedian.
      Walker—the quietest.

WILLIAM KILMARTIN

Doings of the Cafeteria Class

One of our members, Harry Evering, has secured a position with Mr. Linton in his new restaurant. Harry is to have charge of the receiving department.
     The members of our class who are graduating this year must run the Cafeteria for one week. Arthur Lee will manage it for the week of June 7, Harry Evering the next week and Margaret Bauman the third week. Eleanor Simpson will have charge the last week.
     Charles Wilson has left the Cafeteria and is now working in a garage.
     Sarah Kercher will be the editor of the Vocationalite starting with the September issue.

Mr. Cummins: What is the difference between conduit and water pipe?
      Walter Simpson: Water pipe is rough on the inside. 
      George Ulmer, from aside: No wonder the water comes out so lumpy!

ORIGINAL—DAVE HYMAN

Review of Activities in Sports

During the past year our athletic teams, all coached by Mr. Forbes, made a splendid showing in scholastic ranks.
     Our football team, captained by Harold Wallace, won one third of their games, winning three and losing six. By defeating Atlantic City Vocational School we captured the South Jersey Vocational School title.
      Our Red and White basketball team, captained by Minar "Reds" Pierce, had a very successful season, winning fourteen out of seventeen games. By defeating Newark Vocational School and Atlantic City Vocational School we again carried off the New Jersey Vocational School Championship.
      The Swimming team, captained by Harold Steelman, had a fairly good season, winning three meets and losing six.
      Printing (A), led by Robert Bloxsom, captured the Inter-class Basketball Banner after a hard fight with Machine Drafting and Painting (A).
      Machine Shop (B) was victorious in the Inter-class Swimming Meet.
      Our school again won the Y.M.C.A. Water Carnival for the second straight year.
      The closing of the Inter-class Baseball League will end a very good season in athletic activities, one in which nearly every boy in the school has participated in some sport.

Plastic Paint Finishing

Plastic paint finishes often take the place of wall paper in beautifying the interior of a house.
      To prepare a surface for plastic paint you must have smooth surface without any cuts or holes. The wall also must have a thin coat of size with some plastic paint in it to give the proper foundation for the plastic finish. 
      Plastic paint is bought under the names of Textone, Paratex, Miraltex, Craftex, and Rufkote. It comes in powder form. Mix the dry powder with water until it is a fairly thick pigment, then apply to the wall with a three-inch brush. It must be put on and layed off smoothly. It is then ready for the texturing. The tools used most for texturing are spoon, fork, sponge, brush and bread knife.
     Let the plastic paint dry good and hard and then sandpaper it fairly smooth. Apply a coat of size and let dry. The panel is now ready for a coat of glaze.
      The glaze coat can be made from any oil pigment thinned to the consistency of water by any flattening oil. Put the glaze coat on with a brush. Wipe out the highlights with a large piece of soft cloth. Using a circular motion, work from the center to the edge of the panel.

HARVEY CALE

June 1930       CAMDEN COUNTY VOCATIONALITE       Page 15

The Rise of Science

On March 24 in the laboratory of the University of California at Berkeley, a startling discovery was made. Dr. Charles B. Lipman, dean of the graduate school at California, and professor of plant physiology, at the university, announced that the fondest dream of the scientific world was close at hand, that is—the preparation of synthetic life. Dr. Lipman, while preparing agar, a substance made from Japanese seaweed, and used as a medium for the cultivation of bacteria, chanced to examine a tiny smear magnified three thousand times under a powerful microscope, and what he saw there caused him to proceed into a further investigation. Dr. Lipman first saw what he thought to be a contaminating organism growing in the agar.

He also stated that agar is the sort of ground bodies which looked like bacilli and which absorbed dye as bacilli would. 

Annoyed by the presence of the supposed "impurities," Professor Lipman subjected the agar to a steam bath of 226 degrees Fahrenheit for about fourteen hours, in order to remove the unwanted organisms.

At the end of this period upon making another test the "living matter" was found to be still present.

Becoming suspicious of their origin he made a thorough investigation and became convinced that the rods were crystallizations of the agar, simulating in every detail one of the simplest forms of life. 

Dr. Lipman advances the theory that originally life may have risen in this manner— through the crystallization of colloid or complex substances.

He also stated that agar is the sort of ground in which life, if it did originate spontaneously, would be expected to develop, as it contains carbon, hydrogen, oxygen and nitrogen, some of the most essential elements of living matter. 

Dr. Lipman states in a preliminary report of his work :

"It may be that we are dealing with facts which may be easily confirmed by anyone. It is fascinating, however, and irresistible to speculate as to whether or not these artificial bacilli may, under the proper environmental conditions, take on properties of living cells. While of course this seems like a wild dream, I am investigating this possibility."

Whether or not Dr. Lipman^s discovery will be confirmed by the scientific world is unknown, but it cannot be termed an altogether "impossibility."

Condensed from an article in the Camden Courier.—R. WADDELL, Chemistry.

Printing Ink

Printing Ink consists of pigment, vehicle and drier. Various other substances are added for different purposes, but unless some one is familiar with the composition of ink it is unwise to add something to it. It might do more harm than good. All doctoring of ink should be done by the maker. 

A large number of pigments are used in making printing-ink. Some are earths in a raw or natural state. Some are burned, some are separated from chemical mixtures and others are made by dyeing a base with some coloring matter. The object of the pigment is to give body and color to the ink. The pigments used in printing-inks vary in strength. Ivory black has greater covering power than either carbon black or lampblack. For this reason a higher-priced ink is sometimes cheaper in the long run than a lower-priced one because it will cover a larger area.

The vehicle is a varnish which carries the pigment and permits it to be rolled out and spread thinly over a surface. Varnishes for printing-inks are made from rosin-oil and linseed-oil. The better grades are made from linseed-oil. This oil is taken from the seeds of the flax plant which are crushed, heated and put Into hydraulic presses which squeeze out the oil. The oil is then boiled for a definite period. The longer the oil is boiled, the more sticky it becomes. It is then possible to obtain a varnish good for mixing ink for any purpose. Each particular branch of printing requires a different kind of ink. The inks used in lithographing and die-stamping are not good for letterpress work.

Information condensed from "Printing for School and Shop," by F. S. Henry. 

CHARLES YATZUS, Print (B)

Faculty Party

On April 25th a most enjoyable time was had by the members of the faculty at a party held in the school. The committee consisting of Mrs. Callahan, Mrs. Borden and Mr. Corson had a very well arranged program consisting of progressive bridge, flinch, checkers, peggity, five hundred, dancing and swimming. Following this an excellent lunch was served in the cafeteria with Mr. Rodgers acting as master of ceremonies. The wit of Mr. Rodgers and Mr. Taylor made the evening most enjoyable for everyone.

Page 16       CAMDEN COUNTY VOCATIONALITE       June 1930

"Daubs" from the Paint Shop

The Painting- Class is working on textured panels. This is the last important step which we will take up in school. The Paint Shop is going to have three paperhanging rooms for the next term.
      Robert Spratt has been elected secretary of the Athletic Association.
      Forest Fidell is out of school suffering from a broken knee.
      We have finished quite a number of cafeteria tables.
     Jaep has just finished outlining the numbers on the door with gold.
      Painting (A) finished a large table for Mr. Hall's office.
      Reid refinished an old buffet and is starting on a radio cabinet which was made by one of the woodworking boys.
     There will be three graduates from Painting (A). They are Louis Bobo, Conrad Maurer, and Anthony Dzierzynski.
     New members coming into the Paint Shop seem to get puzzled when they hear of "a paint stretcher", "a bucket of striped paint" or "a can of chrome yellow ground in coal oil."

"Knocks" from the Auto Shop

    Powell is our coming heavy weight champion.
    Joe Kanzler is our coming fight announcer.
    Neild is a Hudson specialist.
    Ford is our dog trainer.
    "Chick" is our coming garageman.
    "Dutch" Klostermann claims he is Irish.
    Bobby Zimmerman is a future boxing champion.
    Panden is our history expert.
    Dischert is a coming boss.
   "Prof." Wright is our most learned man.
Shorty Klostermann, Ciccotello and Zimmerman are working on a 1928 Essex coach.
    Harold Wallace who gives the Auto (A) the fighting spirit was recently elected president of the Athletic Association.
     George Boyer is positively sure that sleeping in the English class is invalid.
     Thomas Neild has a few more bolts to tighten and his career as a student of Auto (A) will be ended.
     Frank Panden is working on a Paige touring car. New pistons, rings and wrist pins were installed, brakes were relined and valves ground.
     Tom Neild and Joe Kanzler overhauled Mr. Hall's Hudson.
     Captain Wallace is overhauling a Chandler with "Gramps" Wray.
     Neild is working with "Little" Geutens on Mr. Morrow's Durant.
    No wonder Frank Panden is a great pitcher. He's a grease ball himself.

"Reactions" of the Chemistry Class

For the last two months our class has not received the banner for cleanliness, but we are working hard to regain it.
      The Chemistry class supplies the printers with a type metal cleaner.
      The majority of the boys in the Chemistry department are standardizing solutions, running moisture on soap and testing sewage which comes from the Pennsauken disposal plant.
      Allan Stewart has finished taking the specific gravity of alcohol.
      Ildo Pasqualine received all Ts on his report for the entire second year.
      There are three boys who are to graduate from the Chemistry class. They are John Lotland, Richard Willingmyre and Ildo Pasqualine. 
      Leigh Smith has been studying books on glass blowing.
      Some of the class are working on leather.
      Ildo Pasqualine and John Byrd are the lettermen of our class.
      The class enjoyed a pleasant trip to the Hollingshead Company on May 16, 1930.

Fishing Trip Scalings

A real fishing trip off Schellenger's Landing, Cape May, ten miles out to sea, was enjoyed by the men instructors of the school, on Saturday, June 7.
     On the way out the whiteness on Mr. Rodger's face and the distance of travel increased by direct proportion. Mr. Morrow carried along a few lead slugs and stuffed a fish in order to win the largest fish prize. Mr. Bohn took time out. He said it was because of the rain. Apparently his face was washed white by it. Mr. Cummins charged the rail proudly. Mr. Sheppard was troubled with internal chemical combustion. Mr. Corson also had some fine measurements in heaving. Mr. Herrington forgot his culture and greedily pulled out three finny tribe strugglers on one haul. Mr. Ray was so busy hooking fish that the captain requested him to divide his catch in order to balance the boat. Mr. Knittle, a novice, stuck to the ship but saved his lunch for the next time. Mr. Slater plumbed a basket full. Mr. Yates caught some fish and kept his troubles to himself.

CALVIN LEEDS

Al: Hello Bill, what are you doing ?
Bill: Selling salt.
Al: A salt seller huh, shake!

Jim: Go wash your face and neck.
Mary: I'll wash my face but I won't neck.

JOSEPH FIELIS

 

Camden Courier-Post - June 7, 1933

MAILBAG

Pleas for Reopening of Vocational School

To the Editor:

Sir-Please publish this letter I sent to Mr. John T. Rodan, freeholder, 61 South Twenty-seventh Street.

Sir - You have heard from many different sources about the matter on which I am writing to you, perhaps from both points of view. It is concerned with the clos­ing of the Camden County Vocational School.

Until the fall of 1932 I was a student at Camden High School. I always had the intention of finishing high school and then attending some technical college. My plans were shattered when I found that I could not afford to attend college. Not then wishing to finish out high school, I did the only thing that was open to me so that I could get training in the line I had chosen. I enrolled in the Camden County Vocational School as an electrical student.

Now, it seems that I am going to be deprived of that opportunity also.

I am not only thinking of myself, but I am thinking of the several hundred other boys who would not go back to other schools if the vocational school closes. Where would they go'? They will join the already large army of young unemployed.

They will try to find jobs. When they fail to find work, time will be a burden to them. No doubt many of the weaker of their number will fall by the wayside and be a burden to society.

The younger boys who will go back to the already overcrowded junior schools and high schools will lose the years they put in here, and will not have anything to show for it, when they are not able to finish their respective courses. They can never make up the years they lost in the other schools and therefore, they will be quite old when they graduate from the other schools.

Another angle to look at in closing the vocational school is the building and the teachers. If the schools should close it would mean that approximately 35 teachers, not to mention the office staff and janitors, would be thrown out of work.

Are times so good that even these well-trained men and women can get another job the next day? And the building, no matter how many janitors are here to take care of it, will depreciate in value in some way. It is bound to. When it should open again, after remaining idle for several years, I think it would cost almost as much for repairs as it would take to keep the school open now.    

A STUDENT .


Camden Courier-Post- June 13, 1933

SUNDAY BEER AND BARS ADDED TO STATE BILL;
HOME RULE PROVIDED BY NEW MEASURE 
Supplement to Temporary Regulation Would Give Local Control 
LAST ACTION FACES SEPTEMBER DELAY
Woodruff Makes Move To Have Vocational School Kept Open

Trenton, June 12.-Sale of beer over bars and on Sundays after 1 p. m., in municipalities whose governing bodies provide such authority, is provided in a supplement to the temporary beer law introduced in the Assembly tonight. 

On petition of five percent of the registered voters of a municipality protesting Sunday sales, a local referendum would be mandatory at the next general election. 

Assemblyman Thomas M. Muir, of Union, sponsor of both the supplement and the present law, said no effort would be made to have the new measure reported out of the judiciary committee until next week. 
It also was reported that the present temporary law, at first effective only until May 25, then extended to July 1, probably would be given another extension to September 1. 

Referendum Aids Bills 

It is considered certain the Legislature, now hoping to adjourn some time next week, would take only a recess, returning in the Fall. 
There was considerable opposition by many legislators to Sunday selling, but the referendum clause in the supplement was believed by many to pave the way for approval. 

The supplement reads: 

"For the period during which this act shall be effective, it shall, by resolution of the governing body of the municipality, be lawful, there in, to use bars at all times and to sell beverages, with legal content on Sunday after 1 p. m. 

"However, if a petition be signed by 5 percent of the qualified voters of such municipality and presented to the governing body protesting such sale and use of bars and requesting submission of the question to the voters of the municipality, it shall be mandatory upon the governing body of such municipality to include on the ballot at the next general election for members of the general assembly the question: 

(1) Shall the sale of legal beverages be permitted on Sunday after 1: p.m. in this municipality?' 

(2) Shall the use of bars be permitted in connection with the sale and use of legal beverage?' 

"This act shall take effect immediately." 

Vocational School Aided 

No action was taken by the As sembly on the Reeves, and Kuser fiscal reform bills approved by the Senate last week. Assembly Majority Leader Joseph Altman, of Atlantic, announced the joint Republican conference committee would meet at 11 a. m. to discuss these measures. 

Senator Albert S. Woodruff, of Camden, made two moves to aid the Camden County Vocational School, which faces closing after this term due to lack of funds. 

He obtained unanimous consent to introduce a bill amending Chapter 294 of the laws of 1913. The amendment permits semi-annual appropriations for vocational schools for the year beginning July 1, 1933. The law now calls for an annual appropriation by the county. 

Woodruff also submitted to the Senate Judiciary committee an amendment to Assembly 489 by Siracusa now in the committee. The measure originally provides for referendum to approve diversion of $10,000,000 to state school funds from the $100,000,000 highway bond issue approved in 1930. Woodruff's amendment would permit vocational schools to receive part of the fund. According to Woodruff, Siracusa has approved the amendment. 


Camden Courier-Post- June 22, 1933

BRIDGE BOND BILL ASSISTS SCHOOLS 
Senate Adopts Measure Aimed at $8,500,000 Education Relief

Trenton, June 20.Trenton, June 21.-By a unanimous vote of 15-0, the State Senate this afternoon passed Senator Albert S. Woodruff's committee substitute for the Pascoe and Siracusa measures. The bill would provide funds for distressed school districts through sale of Delaware River Joint Commission bonds.

The measure, a companion of Woodruff's No. 207, passed in the Assembly tonight, would permit the state to take over $12,000,000 in Camden Bridge bonds in lieu of cash from the joint commission in payment of the state's investment in the span. The state would then resell the bonds to provide school funds. 

Unlike the Siracusa and Pascoe bills, which would divert the money from state highway bonds, the committee substitute assures assistance for the Camden County Vocational School and other vocational schools throughout the state. 

"This bill," said Woodruff, in explaining the measure, "will, within a few months, release $8,500,000 in new purchasing power in the state of New Jersey. That sum is the amount of the state's school indebtedness now. 

"About $3,000,000 of that amount now is due the teachers in back salaries. The rest is for tuition owed by one school district to another for high school students, supplies bills and transportation bills. 

"It provides further that any balance in the fund in September may be loaned to districts otherwise unable to open their schools because they have no money to pay salaries. 

"The municipalities, of course, must put up securities in the form of tax anticipation notes." 

The bill also provides repayment, in installments, of the $4,000,000 borrowed from the teachers' pension fund for unemployment relief last year. 

" I think it is important," said Senator Woodruff in conclusion, "that we realize the tremendous effect in increasing purchasing power the release of this huge sum will have."


Camden Courier-Post- June 22, 1933

Aircraft Builders Test Motors 

Members of the Aircraft Mechanics Course of the Camden County Vocational School were photographed with their mentor In the closing days of the school term. They are putting on the "finishing touches" prior to examinations. "Art" Arrowsmith, wartime pilot and instructor of the group, is seen in center explaining intricacies of Liberty motors to one of the graduating class.

Trade School to Graduate Class of 76 Here Tomorrow 
Seven Reported to Have Good Jobs Awaiting Them;. 
Five Girls Complete Cafe Course; Many Interested in Aircraft

By E. ALLEN HUGHES

A class of 76 students of the Camden County Vocational School, seven of whom have found positions before graduation, will receive diplomas at ceremonies tomorrow night.

Possible leaders in mechanical, architectural, radio, landscape, gardening and hotel and restaurant work are among the group of girl and boy graduates to receive certificates at the school.

Chief interest, as shown by the number of graduates in the class of aircraft mechanics, centers about the modern mode of transportation. Ten are youths whose study of the craft has been under direction of a former world war aviator and airplane builder are among those to graduate.

Inclination of youths of today seek to further their education by a practical study of sciences is revealed in the showing of classes in aviation and in radio science. The latter class will graduate five students.

Co-operation with industry seemed one of the foremost concerns of the leaders in the educational work who report that no large groups of graduates are thrown into competition with other workers at one time. They are placed, according to needs of business and industries, in small numbers throughout 
the school term.

Cafeteria Work

Five girls who have finished the course in cafeteria and restaurant direction are among the graduates. These courses, instructors relate, are the vanguard of future numbers of leaders in hotel work, which heretofore has been supplied 
chiefly by foreign chefs and managers. A shortage of these workers is predicted owing to stringent immigration laws. 

Modern methods of construction, shipbuilding, plumbing and power plant erection has brought to light another science that has added to enrollment at the school. Many of the "students" the records show, are men of middle age whose work requires a knowledge of that art. These are enrolled in evening classes. 

In the huge workrooms devoted to aircraft mechanics the students have unlimited facilities for airplane construction. Gifts of three airplanes and 20 Liberty motors by the government are included in the equipment which is under direction of "Art" Arrowsmith, war time pilot.

Value of the training the youth receive, according to Joseph Hall, the school principal, is shown in employment records in which employers have requested selection of the students for work particularly from the welding classes.

Average enrollment at the school is 525, according to the roster, while the "turnover" in losses through failure to attend classes is negligible. 

Professor William C. Ash, director of vocational teacher training at the University of Pennsylvania will be the principal speaker at the commencement exercises. He will discuss "The Social and Economic Values Of Vocational Training," 

Hall to Present Class

Director Hall will present the class who will be given diplomas by Burleigh B. Draper, president of the Board of Education of the Vocational School. Rev. Peter J. Kelley, of Sacred Heart Church, will offer the Invocation. Musical selections and vocal numbers are under direction of Clarence Fuhrman.

The class message will be delivered by Frederick L. Young, of the aircraft mechanics division. Harold E. Tompkinson will offer the class farewell. Rev. Pennington Corson, Jr., pastor of Frances Childs M. E. Church, West Collingswood will pronounce the benediction.

The graduates and their classes are:

Aircraft Mechanics- Ora Ford, Albert Hornick, Leo Hills, Harry Johnson, Robert McMillan, Harry Hirsch, William Webb, Fred Young, Edward Toole and Michael Kazekewicz. 

Architectural Drafting- William Duble, Dante Dantastasio, and Lloyd Van Horn. 

Automotive Mechanics- Milton Clark and Stephen Domako. 

Cafeteria and Restaurant Work­ Ivy Truitt, Jeannette Hannum, Eleanor Parus, Marion Friend, Geneva Wilson, Theodore Ratzell and John Todd. 

Industrial Chemistry- Robert Montgomery, and Floyd Selmes, Jr.

Electrical Work-Paul Carberry, John Chalmers, William Schill, Harry Stow and Willlam Dreter. 

Floriculture and Landscape Gardening- James Horton, Joseph Newton, David Rodgers, Jr., and Louis de Stefano. 

Machine Drafting- Anthony S. Caramano, Harry Stout, Paul Maggioncaldi and Willis Wesper. 

Machine Shop Practice- Jack Baldwin, Edward Lesky, Joseph Pakulis and Arthur Savage. 

Plumbing-Vincent Balcikonis, Donald Koerner and Robert Webber.

Printing-George Jones, Walter Toye, Joseph Snyder,·John Zander, Frank Safryn, Arthur Amme and Edmund Twyman. 

Radio-Paul Miller, Roy Peake, Thomas Bennett, Rudolph Koerner and Sigmund Zabicki. 

Welding- Joseph Ciesla, Tony Ragone, Joseph Golembski, Charles Doto, George Streck, John Vittori, Adolph Przwara, William Scholtz and Anthony Tomasello. 

Woodworking- Samuel Stehr, Daniel Schall, Harold Tompkinson, Linwood Connor, Robert Fox, Fletcher Vogel, William Hoey and Frank Paoli.

Painting- Elmer Stone.


Camden Courier-Post- June 24, 1933

VOCATIONAL CLASS TOLD THEY ARE SURE TO GET JOBS SOON
U. of P. Director Addresses 75 Graduates and 500 Who Attend Exercises

EFFICIENCY REWARDED

By Frank Sheridan

In expressing optimism over the future, Professor William C. Ash, director of vocational training at the University of Pennsylvania told the graduates of the Camden County Vocational Training School last night that they would have jobs within six months.

"Sixty-five percent of the graduates of Harvard University have already obtained jobs," he declared. More than 500 attended the exercises.

Professor Ash congratulated the board of freeholders on its decision to continue the school after voting to close it at the end of the present term. He criticized public officials for urging the closing of such schools. He called it "silly" to interrupt the work.

"I know the advantage of a vocational training school because I began as a worker myself and I have always associated with them," he declared. "Industrial education is highly important today. It is intricate and must ever change to meet the time."     

He said he worked 10 and 12 hours a day when he first started. Now a 30-hour week is being advocated, he declared. He predicted that in 50 years from now men will retire at 40 and enjoy the fruits of their labors. 

The graduating class was presented by Joseph M. Hall, director of the school, and Burleigh B. Draper, president of the board of education for the school, presented the diplomas.

John S. Ray, assistant director. presented a gold watch to Donald Koerner for the highest average in plumbing. Special certificates were presented the following for safety efficiency: Fred Shords, Theodore Ratzel, Frederick Young, Daniel Shaw and Harold Tompkinson.

A musical program was given by Clarence Fuhrman's orchestra and vocal selections by Edward Rhein.

Rev. Pennington Corson, pastor of Frances Childs M.E. Church, West Collingswood, offered the benediction. 


Don Hann writes about his days at "Vokie"

I was in the Industrial Chemistry Course back in 1953 or 54 with Bob
Purcell, Bob Peterson, Harry Youmans, and Don McFarland. There was a Cohen in our class from Laurel Springs, NJ. Little tiny guy but a good fellow. I believe Professor Shepard was in charge.

Dr. Camel was the History Teacher and then became the big honcho.

The Welding Instructor was Mr. White who lived in Mt Ephraim.  The head of
the Floriculture School was Arch Browning of Haddon Heights NJ. He was my
former wife's Uncle.

Harry Youmans graduated and eventually obtained a Ph.D. in Chemistry owned, his own company and died just recently. I kept in touch with him.

Bob Peterson also graduated from College and was a big wheel with the NJ
state government. He lived in Mt Holly NJ.

Bob Purcell had his own plumbing business with 6 trucks. I use too see him
at the White Castle in Mt Ephraim NJ. He was married and he had stopped being
a wise guy.

Don McFarland  retired from the Navy and he married the daughter of the man
in charge of Cooper Hospital in Camden NJ. His wife's family owned the
Collegeville Inn in Pennsylvania. She ran the front office and Don managed the help. He is still alive.

I was kicked out of Vocational School and I was sent to Riverside Military
Academy. I graduated and went to VMI in Lexington VA, where I also
graduated. Joined the United States Coast Guard as a Seaman Recruit at Cape May NJ. Thirty 30 years later I retired as a Rear Admiral (two star).

I was assigned TAD (Temporary Assigned Duty) with both the Navy and Marines. Got shot to pieces in Nam and I now live on my own mountain here in Oregon.

I am still ornery. Some people would say that I am mean and nasty and they
would be right. 

If you would like some detailed experiences about Vokie I am available.
After all you do not often meet a boy that got kicked out of the State of NJ
Secondary Education schools and then retires as an Admiral from the United States Coast Guard.


  When I say me I mean us or we. There was not any event that I participated in that did not include me alone. There were a number of guys that participated in all episodes. The memory gets into trouble trying to remember who was involved in what.

The biggest event that happened was our playing the Haddonfield High School Basketball team for the Colonial Conference Championship. The game was played at Vokie and were being broadcasted on local radio. They beat us badly. The problem was that we did not have anyone on the team that was taller then 6 feet. All of Haddonfield’s team was over 6 feet tall. We played with a lot of spirit but were outclassed from the beginning.

Word spread that Volkie was going to beat the h-ll out of the Champs. Reasonable student formed lines so that the Champs could get on the buses. Dr Camel told the radio announcer that the rumors were wrong and there would be no riots.

The thing here was that Camden, Pennsauken and Merchantville Police would not go near the school. County Police said the same thing. State Police had a sub station less then 200 yards away from the school. Then refused to get involved and said that any riots or troubles would result in their calling in the NJ National Guard. We did not want trouble with the National Guard.

If the National Guard did get involved the state would shut Vokie down, where else could we students go and hang out and waste a day?

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