Lawrence
T.
Doran



LAWRENCE T. "LARRY" DORAN was born in 1879 in New Jersey. He married his wife Catherine shortly after the turn of the century. After working as a Camden police officer and as a game warden, in August of 1910 he was hired as a detective by then Camden county prosecutor Henry S. Scovel. He then served under Charles A. Wolverton, who went on to become a 16 term Congressman from Camden. At the time of the 1920 census he lived at 1115 Mechanic Street in Camden NJ. In 1925 he was named chief of detectives in the Camden county prosecutor's office by prosecutor Ethan Wescott. He also served alongside noted such prosecutors as Samuel P. Orlando, Gene R. Mariano, and Mitchell Cohen, later a federal judge.

During his years with the prosecutors office, Larry Doran helped crack several famous cases, helping send killers Walter Dworecki and William John Stephan to New Jersey's electric chair. He was involved with most every major investigation in Camden County for a quarter of a century.

Larry Doran retired in April of 1950 after serving four decades as a county detective, 25 of which as the chief of detectives. He was succeeded by Wilfred L. Dube.

Philadelphia Inquirer - August 23, 1910

John S. Smith - Henry Scovel - Lawrence Doran

Philadelphia Inquirer - January 24, 1911
...continued...
...continued...
Charles G. Garrison - Frank Ford Patterson Jr. - Edward VanDyke Joline  Lawrence Doran
Samuel Flick - Isaac Shreve - Francis J. McAdams
James Smith - Thomas Noland - Abraham L. James - John Broome
Albert Shaw - James Lewis - John Golden - William C. Parker - Daniel Woods
John H. Carroll - Harris D. Stow - Henry S.Scovel
- Martin Carrigan
Aerie No. 5, Fraternal Order of Eagles 

Philadelphia Inquirer - November 22, 1911

Lawrence T. Doran - Charles G. Garrison - John Cherry  
William C. Drew - Market Street - Federal Street - North 23rd Street

Philadelphia Inquirer - April 28, 1912

William T. Boyle - Charles G. Garrison - Charles A. Wolverton  - Howard Carrow
Hebret Drake - William Harris -  William Gradwell - Georgianna Gilliland
Stefano Torcesso - Nunzio Imperato - Charles Ford - Effie Wagner

Philadelphia Inquirer - December 2, 1913

Accused of abusing twelve-year-old Mary Fitzpatrick, of Tenth Street and Federal Street, S. Cleveland Davis was committed to jail by Justice Huyett yesterday. Detective Doran made the complaint on information received.


Philadelphia Inquirer - March 23, 1914

Lawrence Doran - William J. Kraft - Charles H. Fitzsimmons - John Brothers

,,,continued...
,,,continued...

 

Philadelphia Inquirer - April 1, 1914

Howard Buck - Lawrence Doran

Camden Post-Telegram * July 18, 1916

MURDERER AND FORGER ESCAPE JAIL AFTER SHOOTING KEEPERS, KILLING ONE
Wilson Ashbridge, Who Shot and Killed Mrs. Elizabeth Dunbar
and George E. Thompson, Check Swindler, Trap Jailor Hibbs by a Ruse and After Slaying Him Shoot Joe Ellis Who Intercepted Them in Flight.
Used Revolver Smuggled Into Prison by Confederates and Leave Jail Wide Open in Their Flight, a General Delivery Being Averted by Police Who Were Summoned by the Wounded Men.
WILSON ASHBRIDGE GEORGE E. THOMPSON

Murdering one jailor and wounding another with a revolver that had been smuggled into them by outside confederates, Wilson T. Ashbridge, slayer of Mrs. Elizabeth Dunbar, and Francis Murphy, alias George E. Thompson, a check forger, made their escape from the county jail a few minutes before seven o'clock last night.

Ashbridge with his wife was caught at noon in the Keystone Hotel in Chester PA where they registered at one o'clock this morning.

Thompson is still at liberty but from the confident manner of Prosecutor Kraft his early arrest seems assured.

The murdered jailor was Isaac Hibbs, aged 65 years of 913 South 8th Street. The wounded keeper is Joseph Ellis, aged 45 years, of 416 Carteret Street. Shot twice, he is in Cooper Hospital. His condition today is very satisfactory.

Thompson, who is 41 years old, forged a check for $650 which he gave to V.M. Fulton as part of the purchase price of an automobile. The forgery was discovered before the deal was completed and his arrest followed on June 8. he also passed a forged check for $15 on State Motor Vehicle Agent Kraft. He, too, was awaiting trial. In spite of the positive evidence against him Thompson had spurned all efforts to have him plead guilty and it is now believed that he was sparring for time while hatching a plan to escape. He s no doubt the master mind.

R.L. Hunter, a farmer of Bensalem Township, Bucks County PA, about four miles above Torres dale, reported to the Philadelphia police the morning that he had seen a man answering Ashbridge's description on the Bucks Road at daylight. The man asked the way to Riegelsville.

According to Hunter, the man was dressed in a dark suit, and had no hat. His clothing was wet. Hunter did not see anything suspicious in his actions, and after giving him directions, they parted.

Upon seeing the paper with a picture of Ashbridge, the farmer was struck by its resemblance to the man with whom he had talked. He hurried to Tacony and notified the police.

The State police, who patrol that section of the county, and who have an office at Langhorne, were immediately notified as were the surrounding towns.

The shootings took place in different parts of the jail. Hibbs was murdered in the exercise room just outside the cell room on the Sixth and Arch corner of the building. Ellis was shot down in the corridor just outside the Market Street end of the building when he heroically grappled with Ashbridge after the latter had pointed a gun at his head. In spite of his wounds Ellis dragged himself to a telephone and after notifying Police Headquarters of what had happened he collapsed.

Only one of the two bullets is still in Ellis. It entered the groin on the right side and is buried in the muscles of the leg, having taken a downward course for seven or eight inches. The other bullet struck Ellis in the right breast and came out in the left breast, traversing the upper fleshy parts of the body.

Hibbs was almost instantaneously killed by a bullet that went within an inch of his heart, producing a hemorrhage. The bullet was extracted this morning from the body early this morning in an autopsy performed at the morgue by County Physician Stem. In spite of the fact that it is pretty well established that three shots were fires in the attack on Hibbs, only one of the bullets took effect.

"But it makes little difference which of the two men handled the gun" said Prosecutor Kraft this morning. "Both are equally guilty of this murder and what we are concerned about now is the recapture of the gunmen." Mr. Kraft added that it his purpose to examine all of the prisoners in that part of the jail where Hibbs was murdered to determine fully who fired the fatal shot.

The escape had been carefully planned and timed to the minute. Of course the desperate prisoners were aided by confederates on the outside and it is the general belief that a high powered motor car was in waiting for them not far from the jail. They are known to have been in possession of money and openly boasted yesterday that it was their intention to leave the prison last night. These boasts were made to two young ladies connected with a religious organization who called on the tom men yesterday to offer spiritual reconciliation. The girls are frequent visitors to the jail and naturally their efforts at evangelization were directed in the main toward Ashbridge, because of the fact that he was accused of murder. These girls, whose identity officials will not disclose, were closeted with Prosecutor Kraft until one o'clock this morning. Both declared that on their visit yesterday they were told by Ashbridge and Thompson that it was the last day they expected to spend in jail.

"We are going to get away from here tonight and we've got money to help us after we are out " said Ashbridge, who further told the girls he had considerable cash sewed up in the waistband of his trousers. The girls begged the prisoners not to do anything that would  cause them more trouble and they told the Prosecutor that Ashbridge and Thompson promised them that they would not make any effort to escape. In their talks with the girls neither of the prisoners said a word that would indicate that they would kill if necessary to escape. The full force of their boast did not dawn on the religious workers and for this reason it never occurred tot hem to inform the Sheriff of what the prisoners had in said.

A general jail delivery of at least all the men confined in hat is known as the untried department, where the two were held, was only averted by the prompt arrival of the police on their beat, which was made easy by means of the keys taken from the prostrate body of Hibbs. Ashbridge and Thompson left all of the doors open and the vanguard of the inrushing police found the prisoners swarming all over the corridors on the east side of the prison. In the wild excitement following the double shooting and escape none else thought of freedom and a checking up of the inmates after they had been herded in the exercise room of the untried department accounted accounted for all but the fugitive slayers.

The department, in which the two men were confined is the same one which William Brown and Charles Berger made their sensational escape several years ago by sawing away the bars on the Federal Street front of the jail. Thrilling as it was, the former escape was insignificant in comparison with last night's tragic event.

With the full force of the keepers out of the way- one dead and the other suffering from gunshot wounds at first supposed to have been fatal- Ashbridge and Thompson had nothing between them and freedom but the door entering from the spiral stairway leading to the narrow entrance of the Sixth and Market Streets end of the Court House, With the keys taken from Hibbs they opened the door and in a few seconds were breathing the free air. It was still daylight when the daring murderers walked from the building and although they were no doubt seen by some of the scores of persons passing it is certain that they managed to control themselves to such an extent as not to arouse any undue suspicion. The exit they used to escape is that used by the general public and therefore persons passing calmly in and out of the door would not in any manner be thought to have been connected with a jail delivery. However the shots which had laid low the keepers had been plainly heard on all four sides of the building and it is strange that no one has yet been found who can give positive information as to what course the fleeing men took and whether they were aided in their flight by an automobile.

While the police and detectives of Camden and all other cities in the East are watching railroad terminals, steamship lines, and all other avenues of travel in response t the general alarm sent out last night, Prosecutor Kraft is bending all his energies to learn who smuggled in the revolver which the fugitives used. Thus far this feature of the case is as complete a mystery as it was last night. Mr. Kraft and Sheriff Haines are satisfied, however, that only one gun was used for both shootings. It was at first thought that each man had a pistol when they left the jail; that one of them armed himself with the gun that Hibbs was supposed to have carried, but it was determined that Hibbs was not armed when he went into the jail last night. There was no occasion for him to come in contact with any of the prisoners and for that reason he left his revolver in his desk in the office. even had he carried it he would have little chance to use it, so cold-bloodedly was he slain as he unsuspectingly fell into the trap laid for him by the desperate gunmen. There is also some conflict as to how at least on of the fugitives was dressed. Alfred Williams, who witnessed the murder of Hibbs, said that Ashbridge was without coat or ha when he dashed out of the cell-room, and that Thompson carried his coat and hat under his arm. However in a description of the two men given at the Prosecutor's office it was set forth that Ashbridge wore a bue serge suit and a checkered cap. The coat that he is supposed to have taken bore the mark of "Tull- the Tailor," of Jacksonville, Florida. ad had been borrowed by him from another prisoner. He wore tan shoes. Ashbridge is 27 years old, 5 feet 7-1/2 inches in height and weighs 137 pounds. He has brown hair, smooth face and is of light complexion.

Thompson wore a brown suit and a Panama hat. He is 41 years old 5 feet seven inches in height, and weighs 175 pounds. He has brown bushy hair, is minus one of the fingers on his left hand, and is light complexioned.    

The tan shoes worn by Ashbridge were also borrowed from one of the prisoners. He got them on Saturday and remarked that he wanted to look neat.

Keepers Ellis and Hibbs were reading in the prison office last evening when Hibbs glanced up at the clock and noticed that it was a few minutes of seven. "Joe, I'm going back and out the boys in their cells," he said to Ellis and with his keys in his hand he started for the cell room in the untried department. A thirty foot long corridor runs from the office to the barred and grated door opening into the department in which the cells are situated. This department is about the size of three ordinary school rooms and in the southeastern corner of the jail are the cells, in two tiers.

Around the cells is a three foot corridor into which all the cells doors open and in which all the prisoners are permitted to walk when they are not allowed out in the main room. When the inmates are ordered into their cells and their doors closed the doors are locked from the outside of the steel cage by means of a lever worked by the jailor. Thus every cell door can be made secure without the keepers coming into actual contact with the prisoners. In addition to the bars around the corridor fronting on the double tier of cells there is a fine mesh heavy wire screening.

As Hibbs approached the lever which is operated to shut the cell doors after the prisoners have retired from the corridors, Ashbridge was leaning against the grating of his cell, Number 18. Thompson was lounging a few feet away.

"Daddy, open the door, I want you to see this note," said Ashbridge to the keeper, at the same time displaying a piece of paper which he had in his hand. Never giving a thought that he was about to perform an act that which was absolutely necessary for the carrying-out of the well laid plot, or that he was going to his doom, or was even in danger, "Daddy", as the aged keeper was known to all the prisoners, opened the door without hesitation.

As he swung wide the big steel frame, Ashbridge quickly stepped out and the next instant was pressing a gun against the abdomen of the jailor.

"Throw up your hands, you ___ ___ ___" he commanded.

"What are you up to, what's this mean, asked the keeper, apparently not realizing he had been trapped.

For reply Thompson jumped out the door, wrenched the gun from Ashbridge's grasp and with an oath began firing at Hibbs, who sank to the floor at the first shot. Only a few feet away and the only other person in the exercise room, although the shooting could have been seen by any other prisoners who had not retired to their cells, Alfred Williams, trusty, is emphatic in his assertion that Thompson fired the shot that killed Hibbs and that he fired three times.

"It's a wonder they did not get me," said Williams. "Ashbridge and I could not hit it and in his desperate mood I am surprised he didn't kill me, too." Williams, who has just completed a six months' sentence for obtaining money from Italian grocers by falsely representing himself as an agent for a wholesale house in Chicago and who is wanted in the Windy City for the same offense, says the whole transaction took less than a minute and that the moves came so fast he and the other prisoners were powerless to aid.

"It was like a flash of lightning" said Williams, "and before I could fully understand what had happened Ashbridge had grabbed Daddy's keys' which had fallen to the floor, and was off like a deer for the barred door. Ashbridge had taken the smoking gun from Thompson, who had his hat and coat under his arm and who was right behind the other one.

"As they hurried through the door after Ashbridge had opened it with Daddy's keys Daddy called to me to raise him. I put my arm under his head and lifted him slightly from the floor. 'Hold my hands' he sad to me. I took hold of his hands and the next minute he died in my arms. Then I heard two more shots and I knew they got Joe Ellis."

Startled by the shots, and he is emphatic there were three in rapid succession, Ellis leaped to his feet and without taking the time to arm himself ran from the office and turned into the corridor just as Ashbridge, wild-eyed and gun in his hand, came running toward him. Halting three yards away Ashbridge pointed the revolver at Ellis' head and ordered him to throw up his hands.

For reply and without fear of himself the keeper dashed at the murderer and the next instant they wee locked in each others embrace. Working loose the hand which held the gun, Ashbridge pulled the trigger. The bullet struck Ellis in the breast, but the wound was not sufficient to render him helpless. However, before he could grip the pistol arm, Ashbridge fired again and the keeper fell back with a bullet in his groin.

"The second shot got me," said Ellis to Prosecutor Kraft and Assistant Prosecutor Butler at the hospital. "The first one wasn't bad but my strength left me when the second bullet struck. Ashbridge was the only one I saw. I did not see Thompson."

"Dragging himself to the office Ellis managed to reach a telephone and called up the police.

"This is Ellis at the county jail; come quick. Ashbridge has shot me" he weakly said over the phone to Captain Hyde. Then the receiver fell from his hand and he dropped to the floor, but after a minute or two managed to climb into chair.

 While patrol loads of policemen where being hurried to the Court House from the First and Second District station houses, Reserve Officer Charles Hose, on duty at Broadway and Federal Street, who had heard the shots, ran to the Court House and from the office of Assistant Custodian John Lack phoned up to the jail. Ellis managed to answer and in a few word told what had happened. They ran up to the jail and were admitted by Ellis, who was rapidly growing weaker from loss of blood, the trail of which plainly showed just where the injured keeper had moved.

"I guess Ashbridge got away and the jail is all open, you had better take care of the rest of the prisoners," said Ellis to Hose and Lack. The fugitive-murderers had left all doors open and the other occupants of the untried department were swarming through the corridors. Their curses and yells and the shrieks and cries of the female prisoners had turned the place into a perfect bedlam. With the aid of other policemen who swarmed into the Court House like bees, the prisoners were soon herded into the exercise room, where Trusty Williams checked the up and accounted for all but Ashbridge and Thompson.

With the faint hope that the missing pair had not risked leaving the building but had secreted themselves in the structure, the courthouse was searched from pit to dome, but no trace of the men were found.

Detective Doran was the first of the Prosecutor's staff to reach the scene. Mr. Kraft and the balance of the staff soon followed. In the lower end of the county, on official business, Sheriff Haines was reached by phone and Under Sheriff Hewitt was summoned from Pitman and until an early hour this morning the officials were is conference and examining numerous prisoners.

State Detective Walter Le Torneau furnished Prosecutor Kraft with a promising "tip" this morning when he learned that Thompson gave a letter to Freeholder Howard Marshall, of the Eighth Ward, to mail on Sunday. Mr. Marshall states that the letter was addressed to a woman by the name or Mrs. Shelton, in Baltimore MD.

Marshall was attending religious service in the jail when Thompson approached him.

"Put this is your pocket and mail it it for me when you go out," said Thompson to Mr. Marshall, who agreed to carry out the request. Dropping the letter in the mail box Marshall allowed the incident to pass without further notice.

Detective Le Torneau learned this morning that Marshall had spoken to the incident to a friend and the sleuth notified the Prosecutor, The tip will be run down the Prosecutor stated.

Funeral services for Hibbs will be held on Thursday from his late residence. The body will be taken to Langhorne PA where interment will be made in the Friends' Cemetery under the direction of the Schroeder-Kephart Company. Services will be conducted Wednesday evening by Reverend Henry Bradway, pastor of the Eighth Street Methodist Episcopal Church.

POLICE QUICKLY AT WORK

Although the murderous prisoners made their escape, it was no fault of the local police department, which threw out a "dragnet system" that covered practically every outlet fropm the city. as soon as the call reached headquarters the red lights were flashing and every officer and detective who could be reached was sent out on the "man hunt" which was pursued with vigor.

Passing automobiles were pressed into service by the detectives and officers and all haste was made for the ferries, railroad yards, terminals, and trolley points. Citizens cooperated with the police in their efforts to run down the escaping prisoners.

Assistant Chief Hyde received the call from Jailor Ellis, who though wounded himself summoned strength enough to reach the phone.

"This is Jailor Ellis. Hibbs and me have been shot  by that man Ashbridge and help quick!" was the startling message which came over the phone to Chief Hyde about one minute past seven.

It was just at the time the shifts were going on and off at the local station houses. Chief Hyde lost no time. He called to Machine Operator "Eddie" King to send the message to the station houses and flash the red lights. This was done and as fast as the men could run they covered the various points.

The auto patrols were dispatched with all hands to the Court House and the wounded men hurried to the hospital. Coroner Robert G. Schroeder reached the hospital as Hibbs and Ellis were being admitted and he tool charge of the situation and got in touch with Prosecutor Kraft and County Physician Stem.

Detective Captain Schregler was hurriedly summoned, and his men were sent in all directions. Detective Brothers boarded a waiting automobile and a record run was made for the Federal Street ferry.  Sergeant Humes was picked up and in four minutes after the call was received from Ellis Detective Brothers had the ferry covered.

 Detectives Troncone, Painter and Murray and Captain Schregler covered the Kaighn Avenue, Vine Street, and Cramer Hill ferry lines.

Detective Brothers got in touch with the Pennsylvania Railroad officials who put their detective force to work searching freight and passenger cars. The orders were sent out from the railroad office to stop and search every fright train. Dispatches were also sent to Trenton, Mount Holly, and Burlington and it was not long before the news of the atrocious deed had spread throughout the country and many distant places.

Trolley cars were stopped and searched by the police, but not the slightest trace could be found of the escaped prisoners. The police left nothing undone in the "man-hunt."

When news of the affair spread through the city phone calls began to come in to headquarters. Over fifty persons called up to tell the police that they had seen the two men at various places. The "tips" were all run down but none materialized.

Officers Arthur Colsey and Theodore Guthrie, who were on their vacations. lent their aid to Chief Hyde. Policeman Colsey pressed his automobile into service and carried the  police to various parts of the city.

Co-operating closely with Prosecutor Kraft's detectives the city officials formed a combination which in nine times out of ten would have been successful, but the escaped men cleverly eluded their pursuers.

Assisted by Coroner Schroeder, County Physician Stem held a post mortem examination on Hibbs' body. The bullet which caused the death was located in the region of the heart, It passed through the victim's lung, causing a hemorrhage, which resulted in death. Following the examination the body was taken by the Schroeder-Kephart Company at the family's orders to be prepared for burial.

ASHBRIDGE'S FIRST CRIME

The brutal crime for which Ashbridge stood indicted but untried was committed on the night of January 22 at Ninth and Market Streets. It developed that the murderer had followed his intended victim from the morning hours. He trailed her to the home of her sister, a Mrs. Meredith, of 911 Market Street, and laid in wait in the darkness of a building that fatal Saturday night.

Mrs. Dunbar came out of the house and stood on the northeast corner while waiting for a ferry-bound trolley car. She intended going to Sicklerville that night to visit her relatives. With her at the time was her 7-year-old daughter, Eleanor, and her father, Charles Dunbar. Ashbridge advanced toward the woman, who was startled when she saw him. She called to her father that she "didn't want anything to do with Ashbridge."

Before the father could interfere the young murderer whipped out a revolver and covered the father and the woman. He then struck the woman violently in the face with his fist and as she was reeling under the force of the brutal blow Ashbridge fired, the first bullet taking effect in the woman's chest. The brutal murderer then stood over his prostrate victim and holding the revolver less than five inched from his victim's body he pumped four more shots into her.

Policeman Howard Smith and Policeman Taylor were a square distant. Smith saw the entire proceedings and screamed at Ashbridge to stop shooting. A crowd quickly gathered and Dr. Maldeis, who lives nearby, came running to the scene to aid the stricken woman.

Officer Taylor espied Ashbridge in the crowd, The murderer made no effort to run, but stood his ground. Detecting the murderer trying to slip something up his sleeve, Taylor pounced upon him and bore him to the ground, at the same time taking the gun away from him and slipping the handcuffs over the murderer's wrists. Policeman Taylor had to draw his revolver to keep back the large crowd that was threatening. Showing no concern whatever, Ashbridge calmly waited until the police auto arrived. In the meantime the murdered woman's still warm body was placed in a "jitney" and with Officer Smith and Dr. Maldeis a hurry run was made for Cooper Hospital but when the institution was reached, Mrs. Dunbar was pronounced dead.

Ashbridge was taken to the hospital by Policeman Taylor in the police auto. He asked "how she is." Informed that he had accomplished his purpose, the young murderer asked to see the woman. When the white sheet covering the still form of the murdered woman was drawn from the face Ashbridge leaned over and kissed the forehead of the woman. He was then taken to the County jail and locked up. Before Recorder Stackhouse on the following Monday Ashbridge pleaded guilty.

Ashbridge was infatuated with the woman, who was a member of the Temple Theater chorus. Because of Ashbridge's persistent attentions she was compelled to give up her position. Mrs. Dunbar had previously accepted Ashbridge's attentions, thinking that he was unmarried, but upon learning that he had a wife and child she informed him that it would be best for them not to see each other, but the young man refused to discontinue his attentions.

On the day of the shooting Ashbridge was seen in various places. He is said to have followed the woman to the Federal Street ferry, but lost track of her. Around noon he was seen at Front and Pearl Streets by Policeman Boyd, who ordered him to move on. Boyd was about to arrest him as a suspicious character, but Ashbridge pleaded that he was looking for a friend. All that day Ashbridge followed the woman until night, when he cruelly murdered her.

The murderer came from a respectable family. Dissipation is thought to have caused the young man to lose his sense of reasoning. Rather good-looking, Ashbridge had tender baby-like eyes and his case excited sympathy among the more tender-hearted people.

Sweetmeats, tasty sandwiches, and other small luxuries were said to have been given the young murderer while he languished in his cell. He had many visitors. Recently Ashbridge was taken violently ill after eating some crabs which were given him by a friend. He and Jailor Hibbs were very friendly.

THOMPSON A CLEVER FORGER

Thompson, or Murphy, was a self-styled lawyer and was committed by Recorder Stackhouse in June3 for forging checks to the amount of $1,055. The worthless checks were "worked"  on the McClelland-Fulton Auto Company and Motor Vehicle Agent A.C. Kraft.

When a check for $150 presented to the automobile company by Thompson and drawn to the order of "G.E. Thompson" on the Harrisonburg, Virginia National Bank came back from the home office of the Studebaker Company as worthless, Mr. Fulton called in the police.

Thompson had previously presented a check for $890 as payment on an automobile. This check was drawn on Thompson's favor on the Coatesville National Bank and was purported to have been signed by Louis L. Gibney, a hotel man of Downington PA. This check was still in the possession of Mr. Fulton when Thompson was arrested after the first check was returned marked "no funds".

The clever swindler also presented a bad check to Agent Kraft for $15 for which he received the license to operate the automobile which he proposed buying.

Detective Troncone arrested Thompson at Fifth and Market Streets on June 2. The defendant had been living in a room at 220 North Fifth Street.

Giving his home address as Daytona, Florida, Thompson represented himself as a lawyer. well dressed and wearing nose glasses, Thompson was an intelligent appearing man, he had a bushy pompadour which was streaked with gray and talked in a persuasive manner. His forgeries on Mr. Gibney's signature were so clever that Gibney himself could not tell the difference.

After Thompson's arrest Detective Captain Schregler sent out notices to several southern cities. He received responses from Harrisonburg, Norfolk, and Petersburg Virginia and that Thompson was wanted in all three cities for check forgeries.

Bert Hibbs, a city foreman and a son of the slain jailor, was murdered early Sunday morning , December 25, 1910 when his throat was cut by Charles Ridgway, a negro, aged 22 years, of Seventh and Sycamore Streets. It was about 12:20 on Christmas morning that Hibbs while crossing the lots at Seventh and Sycamore was accosted by Ridgeway, who wanted to shake hands with Hibbs. The latter refused, a quarrel ensued and Ridgeway whipped out a razor and slashed Hibbs across the throat with such violence that his head was nearly severed. Hibbs died while on the way to the hospital. Ridgway was arrested after a battle by Detectives Schregler, Painter and Brothers and several officers at his home, 1207 Lilly Row.

Indicted for murder Ridgway pleaded non vult. On April 24, 1911, to a charge of murder in the second degree, he was sentenced to 25 years in state Prison at hard labor.

SECOND MURDER IN JAIL

This is the second murder and second escape from the present jail. The first murder took place in November, 1907, when George Stewart, a young negro, stabbed to death John Snell, who was awaiting trial for carrying in the business of fortune telling. Stewart was in jail on a charge of dealing in opium and cocaine. He had a complete opium layout in his cell. He and Snell had a quarrel and he stabbed Snell to death in his cell. He was tried and convicted and sentenced to be electrocuted during the week of February 8, 1908. He was electrocuted on February 4, being the first man to suffer the death penalty by electrocution.

On July 13, 1910 William T. Brown, alias Gillespie, who had been sentenced to seven years on a charge of forgery, and Charles Berger, who was under sentence for picking pockets, made their escape from jail after sawing the bars on the Federal Street front. They climbed over the balustrade to the roof, descended through a trapdoor, climbed down stairs and walked leisurely through the Court House building and out into the street unnoticed. They entered an automobile and were driven away. They crossed to Philadelphia on a North Cramer Hill Ferry boat.

Several weeks later Brown was arrested in New York City and was sentenced to Auburn Prison on an old charge. His term will expire shortly and he has also applied to the Court of Pardons of this State for a parole. A detainer has been lodged against him at the State prison where he his located and he will; be brought back and resentenced. Berger was captured in Chicago and was brought back and served a term at Trenton.


CAMDEN POST TELEGRAM * July 19, 1916

MURDERER’S WIFE SUPPLIED REVOLVER, SMUGGLING IT IN COVERED BY FRUIT
Confessing Supplying Pistol, in Spite of Husband’s Denial That She Was Guiltless,
Mrs. Ashbridge Is Held Without Bail on Charge of Conspiracy
in Aiding and Abetting Escape From Jail

Slayer's Wife Look For This Man

MRS. MARION ASHBRIDGE GEORGE E. THOMPSON

With Wilson T. Ashbridge under guard in a cell in what was formerly known as Murderer’s Row, the police and county detectives today redoubled their energies towards the capture of George E. Thompson, the forger who escaped with Ashbridge from the County Jail on Monday night after murdering one keeper and wounding another. Stirring the police of all cities in the East to renewed activity, another circular was sent out today by the authorities giving notice of the reward of $500 offered for Thompson’s capture. Attention was strongly directed in the circular due to the fact that one of the fingers of Thompson’s left hand is missing.

The gun with which Ashbridge murdered jailor Isaac Hibbs and wounded Jailor Ellis was smuggled into the jail by Mrs. Ashbridge on Saturday morning. With it went a box of cartridges. The weapon and bullets were passed to Ashbridge in a basket of fruit, being at the bottom of the basket. The jailors were busy at the time she called and as she frequently had brought her husband fruit they did not take precaution to search the basket. Mrs. Ashbridge bought the gun and cartridges on the written request of her husband.

Her confession as to the very grave part she played in the escape and murder was made to the Prosecutor late yesterday afternoon after she had first insisted she had no knowledge if how the gun got into the jail and after her husband had repeatedly declared that the revolver was supplied by Thompson. The revolver, fully loaded, was still carried by Ashbridge when he was captured in the Keystone Hotel......

..... by Recorder Stackhouse without bail for conspiracy in aiding and abetting the escape of her husband and George E. Thompson from the County Jail on Monday night.

The court room was packed to suffocation by a morbidly curious crowd, composed primarily of women. A strange silence spread through the court room when the little woman was led into the court room by Captain Schregler. The regular formality of placing prisoners in the dock was dispensed with the woman's case.

Prosecutor De Unger pointed to the high witness chair and Mrs. Ashbridge sat in it. She evaded the gaze of the crowd, looking intently at the floor and through a window on the Washington Street side. She wore a blue skirt and a white waist. She was without her hat. her hair was carefully arranged and she wore nose glasses.

Resting her chin on her right hand her arm and hand were seen to tremble slightly. So quiet was the room that a pin dropping could have been heard.

"Mrs. Marian Ashbridge," called the Recorder.

"Yes, Sir" was the faint reply of the woman, who did not even look up at the call of her name.

"This complaint charges you with delivering to Wilson Ashbridge and George E. Thompson a pistol and aiding and abetting them in escaping from the County Jail, where they had been lawfully committed. Do you plead guilty or not guilty," said the Recorder as he read the complaint.

"The woman said nothing. Detective Schregler was then called as the complainant. He told of the confession made by the woman and produced the revolver which the woman purchased and which Ashbridge used in his daring escape. The gun, Captain Schregler said, was purchased in a pawnshop at Eleventh and Arch Streets, Philadelphia, on Friday of last week and was delivered to Ashbridge on Saturday morning along with a box of cartridges. "Marian, I will hold you without bail,": said the Recorder.

As the woman was being led from the court room by Captain Schregler and Sergeant Reed the crowd made a rush for the door leading from the court room, whereupon orders were given by the police to the crowd and many were prevented from rushing out. Everybody seemed anxious to secure a closer look at the unfortunate woman.

Visitors were denied Mrs. Ashbridge. Not even her children were permitted to be brought before her, although the broken-hearted mother asked for them.

"Oh, God, I don't know why I did this; why I left the little ones to go with Wilson," tearfully expostulated Mrs. Ashbridge to the kind-hearted matron, who spent the best part of last night with the distraught woman.

"If I could only see little Marian," sobbed the woman in the arms of Mrs. Kirkpatrick, who informed her that perhaps she could see them today.

Last eveneing the only support Mrs. Ashbridge had was a cup of tea. The morning she sipped a portion of a cup of coffee. She told Matron Kirkpatrick that she was not hungry.

:Everybody hounded me, I had no friends, and that's why I went with my husband, becasue he was the only friend I had left," said Mrs. Ashbridge. "He was a good boy, but was easily led." The wife said even before her marriage that Ashbridge would run around with other girls, but he always returned to her and she forgave him. She said he seemed to have a spell over her and she couldn't leave him.

"I love my husband, still and will stand by him to the end," sobbed the little woman to Mrs. Kirkpatrick. She told how her relatives disowned her and how after her father's death she went to live with strangers. When her husband fostered the plan to escape she willingly consented to aid him. She drew $100 out of the bank and purchased clothes and the gun and bullets. She never faltered in her plan.

"My heart aches for that woman," said Matron Kirkpatrick this morning to a Post-Telegram reporter. "She's a good girl, but was easily led into her present predicament. It only goes to show what a woman will do for the man she loves, no matter how base a wretch he may be. Mrs. Ashbridge is more to be pitied than scorned.

Recorder Stackhouse this morning produced a copy of the marriage of the couple, performed by him on July 28, 1914. The marriage was performed at the instance of Assistant Prosecutor Butler after Ashbridge wronged the girl. Constable William E. Headley and William C. Ashbridge, the latter father of the murderer, were witnesses.

As told in yesterday's Post-Telegram, Ashbridge and his wife and their captors arrived at the City Hall from Chester shortly after 2:00 o'clock. After a brief stay they were taken to the Court House and turned over to Prosecutor Kraft, Ashbridge being taken into the Prosecutor's private office and Mrs. Ashbridge being placed under guard in the ante room.

Taking full blame for the murder of Hibbs and the wounding of Ellis, Ashbridge declared that none of the shots were fired by Thompson.

"I shot both men," he declared, "but Thompson gave me the gun. He had it since Saturday." He repeated this assertion several times in the course of his examination, adding each time that his wife had no part in supplying the firearm. His voluntary insistence in.....

.... exercise corridor of their cells in response to his request that he wanted to show him a note that had been left for him, he asked the aged keeper to step inside the corridor. Evidently suspecting something was wrong Hibbs refuse to enter the corridor. When Ashbridge repeated his request that Hibbs step inside, Thompson, why was immediately behind Ashbridge, said something to the murderer. Ashbridge could not exactly recall what the expression was. At any rate it was then that he fired and Hibbs fell to the floor with his death wound. To take Hibbs keys and open the door leading from the exercise room to the corridor was the work of but an instant. It was then that Ellis confronted Ashbridge at the other end of the corridor. He refused to throw up his hands when the murderer so ordered. Instead, the plucky jailor grappled with the slayer, who again brought the gun into play, twice wounding the remaining jailor.

Ashbridge did not say why he wanted Hibbs to step inside the corridor. One surmise is that the pair had planned to get the old man into the corridor, overpower him, take his keys and after gagging him place him in a cell, depending ion the gun to awe any prisoners who might make an outcry. But whatever their plan was in this respect it miscarried. Hibbs would not enter the corridor and was shot down where he stood.

Thompson carried both his own and Ashbridge's coats when they fled,. As Ashbridge had decided to do the talking with Hibbs when the jailor came to lock them in their cells it was agreed that it would not be wise for the murderer to be wearing a coat. This might look suspicious to Hibbs and in all likelihood he would refuse to open the door. Hence it was decided that Thompson should take both coats. He also carried Ashbridge's cap and his own Panama.

The coats and harts were adjusted as they ran down the spiral stairway leading to the street. They walked slowly into Sixth Street; increasing their pace up Sixth Street after crossing Market and after turning into Cooper walked very rapidly. They turned north on Third Street to Main and thence to the Vine Street ferry, where they caught the boat leaving at 7:15 for Philadelphia. Landing on the other side the fugitives exchanged hats. They walked rapidly to Broad Street Station, where Mrs. Ashbridge was in waiting, this arrangement having been made when she smuggled the gun in to her husband on Saturday morning.

Accompanied by Thompson the Ashbridges walked out Market Street to Thirty-second Street. Here Thompson left them and after walking the street for a brief while longer the slayer and his wife boarded a trolley car for Chester, where a few hours later the murderer's short-lived liberty was so dramatically terminated.

Although jailor Ellis still insists that three shots were fired before he was attacked and in spite of the positive declaration of Alfred Williams, the trusty, that three shots were fired at Hibbs, Ashbridge claims that Hibbs was shot only once and that two bullets  were used on Ellis. He said that the three empty shells which the detectives found in his pocket contained the only bullets fired in the jail. The post mortem examination made yesterday by County Physician Stem bears out his contention as to the number of shots fired. Only one bullet was found and that had penetrated the jailor's heart.

"That's the truth about the shooting," declared Ashbridge. "I fired the shots- three of them in all- and the gun was given me by Thompson. My wife had nothing to do with it. Don't blame her."

Enroute back to the prison from which he had made his tragic getaway on Monday night, Ashbridge passed through the ante room where his wife was under guard. He stopped, kissed her, gently caressed her cheek, told her not to worry and passed on to the jail, from whence his next exit will be to the electric chair.

Haggard and very weak Mrs. Ashbridge was at once taken before the Prosecutor. With due regard for her condition Mrs. Ashbridge was handled very gently. At first she insisted that she had no part in getting the gun, but under skillful handling she finally broke down and confessed that she had supplied the revolver.

She stated that on Friday night she received a letter from her husband telling her that he planned to escape from the jail on Monday night and that he needed a revolver to make certain that his scheme would not fail.  He requested that she procure the pistol and cartridges and personally deliver them on Saturday. being anxious to aid her husband in every way possible she readily decided to do as he requested.

Accordingly she purchased the needed articles in a Philadelphia pawnshop on Friday afternoon, paying $3.00 for the pistol and 67 cents for the cartridges. She kept them over night and on Saturday safely delivered the weapon and bullets to her husband in the bottom of a basket of fruit. At the same time Ashbridge asked her to go with him and when she agreed to share his fate he told her to meet him in Broad Street Station, Philadelphia, shortly after seven o'clock on Monday night. He further told her that he had carefully studied the situation and did not see how it was possible for his plan to miscarry. On Monday morning she sent her children to the home of Mrs. Anna Dick and later in the day sent the letter to Mrs. Dick telling of her "rash deed" and enclosing $10 for the children.

As Mrs. Ashbridge told her story she spoke in a very low tone. Most of the time her eyes were cast down and as she concluded her brief narrative she sobbed convulsively and was in a state of utter collapse. Reviving somewhat when given cold water Mrs. Ashbridge was turned over to the police and taken back to City Hall to await her hearing this morning.

The prison key stolen by Ashbridge from Hibbs' murdered body was recovered this morning by Detective Doran in the yard of Dr. Frank, 2025 Chestnut Street, Philadelphia. The recovery of the key was sue to information given by Ashbridge, after he had been locked up in jail yesterday afternoon. Ashbridge, when questioned as to the whereabouts of the key, said that Thompson had it and that he had seen him toss it over a wall of a residence near Twenty-third and Chestnut Streets on Monday night while he and his wife and Thompson were walking to Thirty-second Street.

Detective Doran and Constable Voight went to Philadelphia late yesterday afternoon and searched in vain for the key in the vicinity of Twenty-third and Chestnut Streets until darkness came on. Detective Doran renewed the search early this morning. There is a high wall fronting the yard at the home of Dr. Frank, and a search of the grounds resulted in the finding of the key, which was returned to Sheriff Haines.

Ashbridge is confined in a large cell in what is known as Section E. As cellmates he has two persons who are being held as witnesses to the crime. Sheriff Haines has assigned three constables, Gardner, Ford, and Addison. They will work on eight-hour shifts and will see that Ashbridge does not attempt any further escape or try to end his life.

Sergeant Detective Kane of the Chicago Police Department today took to Chicago Alfred Williams, who was an eyewitness to the murder of Hibbs. Williams, an Italian, served six months here on a charge of false pretence in obtaining money from a number of Italian grocers under the pretence that he represented the Roma Grocery Company. After his arrest and sentence here the police of Chicago lodged a detainer against Williams who is wanted in the West for a like crime.

The body of Jailor Hibbs will be exposed to view tonight at his home, 913 South 8th Street. Services will be conducted by Reverend Harry Bradway, pastor of Eighth Street Methodist Episcopal Church. Members of the Seventh Ward Republican Club, Mutual Aid and the Liberty Beneficial Society will attend in a body.

Tomorrow morning the body will be taken to Langhorne, where services will be held in the Friends Meeting House, after which interment will be made in the burial ground by the Schroeder-Kephart Company. Friends may call this evening to pay their respects.

Ashbridge will not be tried until December. On the day he was listed for trial of murdering Mrs. Dunbar his lawyer, Assemblyman Wolverton, was ill. In the interim the entire panel of jurors for the April term of court was discharged following a case of alleged tampering. This makes it necessary that he be held until September for trial unless the Court should otherwise decree, which is hardly likely.

Ashbridge is 22 years old and not 27, as previously stated. His real age was disclosed by the certificate of his marriage. He was 20 when he wedded two years ago,

The Howard Marshall who mailed a letter to a woman in Baltimore is not Freeholder Howard Marshall of the Eighth Ward, as was reported to the Prosecutor yesterday. Mr. Kraft's investigation disclosed that Freeholder Marshall does not know either Ashbridge or Thompson and that as a matter of fact the Marshall in question is an East Sider and to relative to the freeholder, who was naturally much upset at being mistakenly dragged into the case.

E.S. Fry, proprietor of the Keystone Hotel, Chester, where the couple were caught, told the story of the capture both to the city police and Prosecutor Kraft.

"Late on Monday night I received a call from another hotel, requesting that I take care of a man and his wife for the evening," said Mr. Fry. "I waited until a little before midnight when the couple arrived. He seemed nervous and registered in a shaky hand, and I was suspicious that there was something wrong."

"I did not pay much attention to the way he registered until the next morning when I examined the register and saw that he had neglected to register his wife. He signed 'Mr. Smythe, Washington, D.C.' I communicated my suspicions to my wife and told her to go observe the couple, too. Then I went out on the porch and picked up a morning newspaper. On the front page were the pictures of the two men  who escaped."

"I instantly recognized Ashbridge, but was not just sure of my identity of the man, so I decided to get a better look at him. At the breakfast table I observed him more closely and feeling sure of my ground I called Captain Schregler, afterward securing the service of two negro policemen, whom I placed on guard outside the hotel, giving them orders not to allow the couple to leave. The officers, William Padgett and William Robinson, took their positions outside the hotel, ready for the signal to enter when I gave it."

"Ashbridge arose."

"What's the matter," he exclaimed. "You know what's the matter," replied Mr. Fry, who brought in Captain Schregler and Detective Hunt. Schregler and Hunt instantly recognized the fugitive.

Before Ashbridge had a chance to move his arms were pinioned by his sides and Policeman Hunt had extracted the murder gun from his right hip pocket. It was fully loaded. In the same pocket were seventeen additional cartridges and in a suitcase in his room, Number 9, was a fresh box of cartridges.

"The little wife was crying bitterly," said Mr. Fry. "She leaned her head upon his shoulder and the husband tried to console her."

Captain Schregler sent a telegram to Chiefs Gravenor and Hyde with the startling news that Ashbridge had been caught.

On the way back to Camden Mrs. Ashbridge began to cry. She was sitting beside Captain Schregler, and he tried to console her. Her sobs increased, and Ashbridge called to her to "take it easy".

This seemed to quiet her a bit, and Schregler spoke to her kindly, saying that she would not be blamed very much for her part in the escape. "That's nopt worrying me" she answered. "I am worried about 'Wil'."

"well you women beat me" was Schregler's comment. "What did you want to help him escape for, anyhow? He had beaten you, deserted you for another woman and when she turned him down, he killed her. Yet you make up with him, leave your kids and risk everything to help him escape. Seems to me the worse men treat you women, the more you will do for them."

"Lots of truth in what you say'" remarked Mrs. Ashbridge, with a sigh.

Mr. Fry was the center of attention. Everybody seemed anxious to hear his story.

"I'm not going back until I collect that $500 either," he was heard to say. The capturer was formerly coroner of Delaware County.

Scenes of excitement were prevalent when the automobile of Chief Gravenor with Detective-chauffer David Hunt at the wheel, Captain Schregler and the prisoners in the rear and Chief Dodd, of the Pennsylvania Railroad police force in the front seat came from the Federal Street Ferry. E.S Fry, the hotel proprietor who caught the Ashbridges, was also in the car.

Ashbridge and his wife were instantly recognized. The news spread like wildfire and was passed along the route of the machine to police headquarters.

Thinking that the prisoners would be brought to the Prosecutors office, a battery of newspapermen and photographers were camped on the Court House plaza. When someone cried in bellowed tones "There they go", the scribes and photographers started in hot pursuit behind the automobile.

The officers upon reaching the City Hall had to fight their way through the dense crowd which had gathered outside Police Headquarters. Many stood tiptoed to get a good glance at the prisoners who were abashed at their predicament.

Pulling her black straw hat over her face, Mrs. Ashbridge leaned on her husband's arm. To hide his face the murderer pulled the Panama hat, which he had secured from Thompson, over his countenance.

Preliminary questioning was done by Captain A.L. James, after which the officers and prisoners were escorted upstairs to the office of Chief Gravenor.

Still clenching the stump of a cheap cigarette in the corner of his mouth, Ashbridge had a pitiful look on his face. He was much thinner than he was when he was arrested for the murder of the Dunbar girl. On his upper lip was a small mustache, which he raised during the last week.

His beautiful and baby-like eyes still retained their piercing stare. The murderer looked wild-eyed at persons in the room. He seemed to take delight in singling out persons in the room and "staring them out". None seemed courageous enough to return Ashbridge's strange stare. He looked distressed but the only betraying sign of nervousness was his incessant twitching of his fingers. Sweated on the couch in the chief's room, Ashbridge talked freely.

His wife dried away the tears as they trickled down her reddened face but after regaining her composure she seemed quite calm. She intently watched Captain Schregler and Detective Hunt as they searched through her husband's clothes.

When the trip for the Court House was being arranged the two prisoners, still handcuffed together, walked in the outer room of the chief's office. It was then that the wife broke down slightly. She choked back a sob and leaned her head on her husband's shoulder. Ashbridge did likewise and patted her on the back, at the same time, saying something in a suppressed tone of voice. The only persons in the room at the time were Assistant Chief Hyde and a Post-Telegram reporter. Neither was able to catch the words uttered. Captain Schregler, Chief Gravenor, and Detective Hunt later entered the room and the start for the Court House was made. Gravenor

The crowd below which was camped about the entrance to the building awaited with patient expectancy, when the news was spread that the prisoners were leaving the building.

Camera men took their positions, ready to snap the couple, but the Ashbridges fooled them. Before the door leading to the street was opened Ashbridge drew his wife to him and with their free hands pulled their hats over their faces, thus eluding the photographers, who resorted top every means to secure a photograph.

Once inside the automobile the prisoners seemed content until the Court House was reached when another large crowd was on hand to great them. Both repeated the trick of hiding their faces.

After Ashbridge was taken to his cell his wife was ordered taken to the detention department in the City Hall. Captain Schregler and Detective Hunt half-carrying the sobbing and broken-hearted woman, who has aroused some sympathy for her courageousness in taking such a desperate chance for the man she loved, the father of her children and a cruel murderer.

"What other woman would do as much as she has for her husband," was the query advanced by one of the spectators in the Court House corridor as Mrs. Ashbridge passed through on her way to the waiting automobile.


Gettysburg Times
Gettysburg, Pennsylvania 

July 27, 1916

 

 


(Mt. Holly) New Jersey Mirror - October 20, 1920

Hacked Remains of David Paul, Missing Bank Messenger, Discovered by Gunners. 

The Authorities of Burlington county have another baffling murder mystery to solve.

On Saturday four duck hunters, William and James Cutts, and C.B. Inston, of Tabernacle, and George W. Duncan, of Audubon were passing through the pine forest at Irick's Crossing, near Tabernacle, when their attention was attracted by an automobile track following an old and rarely used trail leading to a stream toward which the gunners were making. 

As the car was miles off the nearest traveled road the tracks aroused the curiosity of the men and they followed them. In a short time they came upon a freshly made mound over which dead leaves had been thrown. Leading to the mound from the shallow stream nearby were tracks of men and also marks as though some heavy object has been dragged by the men making the tracks. Thinking perhaps that a deer had been shot and secreted there, one or two of the men scratched around the end of the mound with sticks and within six inches of the surface a human foot was unearthed. 

This put an unexpected phase upon the situation and the gunners decided to let Sheriff Haines continue the investigation.

Word was hastily phoned to the jail at Mount Holly and the Sheriff and Detective Parker lost no time in reaching the scene of the tragic discovery. The new-made and crude grave was then opened under the Sheriff's direction. The body proved to be that of a man, fully dressed except for his coat which was lying buried deeper and under the body. The feet were tied with a heavy rope such as is used in towing automobiles and they were resting upward and back over the dead man's head. As soon as the features were uncovered Sheriff Haines recognized the dead man as David S. Paul, of Camden, a bank runner, who had been reported missing by the Broadway Trust Company of Camden ten days before, with $65,000 in cash and liberty bonds and $12,500 in checks besides a number of cancelled checks. The body was badly mutilated and it was evident that a brutal murder had been committed. 

Apparently Paul had been dead but a few hours and the remains were in a good state of preservation when discovered by the merest chance by the gunning party. There was a deep gash on the head as though made by a axe or hatchet, and the forehead was crushed in. Another ghastly wound just above one ear, alone was sufficient to have caused almost instant death. 

Every indication pointed to the man having been killed and buried within twenty-four hours of the discovery of the crime. The rigor of death had not yet set in and the victim's face appeared to have been freshly shaven. The marks on the ground accompanying the feet tracks leading from the stream about a hundred feet away, were quickly explained when the body was unearthed. Evidently those who brought the body to the unfrequented spot had attempted to secret it in the stream, but finding the water too shallow to conceal the corpse, they had dragged it out again by the rope which bound the feet and pulled it to the spot where the grave was quickly made and the body of the unfortunate man shoved into it. 

The clothes which Paul wore bore every evidence of being new. The shoes also had evidently just been purchased and the soles bore no evidence of wear. A search of the body failed to reveal any of the cash which the bank messenger is alleged to have taken when he so suddenly dropped out of sight while on his way across the ferry to go to a bank in Philadelphia to take the money, securities and checks for his employers. Only one cent was found in the pockets of the dead man. In the coat was a bundle of checks, said to have been cancelled.

There had been no attempt to conceal the identity of the dead man. His watch which had stopped at 9:37, was found in his pocket and a stickpin and in his tie and (as written) a pair of sleeve buttons remained in the cuffs. 

How the dead man came to his untimely end and how his body happened to be buried in the far away spot in the pines miles from any human habitation, was a mystery when the body was first discovered and it seems to be as much so today, although the authorities here, as well as those of Camden and Philadelphia, are exerting every effort to run down the criminals. 

It will be recalled that Paul, who was 59 years of age , enjoyed the confidence of the bank officials by whom he had been employed for many years. He was a recent visitor in Mount Holly where he had a son, Harry Paul, and other relatives. 

On the morning of October 5 Paul started across the river to Philadelphia in company with another bank employee with a satchel said immediately afterward to contain $10,000 in cash and $12,500 in checks. This statement has since been revised and the amount of cash and Liberty Bonds that Paul carried is now variously stated to have been from $45,000 to $65,000. Upon reaching the other bank the other employee became separated from Paul whether by accident or through Paul's design is not yet known and after an attempt to find him at the ferry house, he went at once to the bank and reported his companion's disappearance. 

The Central Trust Company was immediately notified and after all efforts to get in touch with the missing messenger had failed the Camden and Philadelphia police were asked to locate Paul. Nothing more was seen or heard of him until his hacked body was discovered in the pines near Tabernacle ten days after his disappearance. What the missing bank runner did during the interim, where he spent his time or with whom he associated while the police of the county were searching for him has not yet been learned but it is expected that the mystery will be solved before long. 

One clue which seemed to put under suspicion the occupants of a yellow car turned out to be valueless when the owner, hearing of the authorities suspicions, came forward, gave his address as Haddonfield and proved that he drove a party in his yellow car inspecting some real estate in the pines shortly before the discovery of the body of the murdered man. 

Detective Parker yesterday said that he had just picked up what he considered the first piece of valuable evidence in the case since he stated to work on it on Saturday. He declined to state what this evidence was for the present. 

There are endless theories being advanced as to how the dead man met his fate and in explanation of his disappearance with the large sum of money entrusted to his custody. Some officials incline to the view that Paul was killed either in Philadelphia or Camden and his body taken to the lonely spot at Irick's Crossing in the confident belief that it never would be discovered or at least not until time had obliterated identifying marks. 

Another theory is that the murdered man was taken alive in the automobile and killed near the spot where his body and rifled clothes were found. There is no means of telling which theory is correct at this time, quite as possibly both theories are at fault. 

The body was taken in charge by Coroner Isaac Clover who ordered it removed to the undertaking establishment of Cline & Sons, at Vincentown. There Dr. Longsdorf, of Mount Holly and Dr. Stein, of Camden, performed an autopsy, the result of which showed that Paul come to his death by wounds to the head, probably inflicted by a dull axe or hatchet. 

There was a conference in Mount Holly on Sunday in which officers of Camden and Burlington counties participated. Those taking part were reticent after coming out of the room in which that meeting was held. In the discussion of the crime and the preparation of plans for running down the murderers, if there were more than one, were Sheriff Haines, Clifford R. Powell and County Detective Parker, of this county, and Prosecutor Wolverton, and Detectives Schregler and Doran, of Camden county.

A reward of $1,000 offered by the Broadway Trust Company for the apprehension of Paul shortly after his disappearance is to be increased now for information leading to the capture of his murderers. It is easily the most mystifying case that had come to the attention of the Burlington county officials for many years but they express confidence that it will be solved and the criminals run down.


Philadelphia Inquirer
December 9, 1921

Howard M. Smith

 

 


Trenton Evening Times - March 7, 1927
... continued...
... continued...
... continued...
Harry Bentley - Joseph Curry - William Juliano - Frank Doris - Harry M. Cooper
Olney Bank & Trust - William O. Miller - Lawrence T. Doran - Ethan Wescott
Matthew Overnack - C. Stuart Patterson 

Camden Courier-Post - January 2, 1928

BABE PARADISE ADMITS HE IS NARCOTIC KING
3 Others Held by Camden Police as Leaders in Dope Peddling Gang
OPERATIONS COVERED ALL OF SOUTH JERSEY
Tell of Making Buys With Auto Used as ‘Silent Salesman’

Captured after a lengthy investigation, Anthony ‘Babe’ Paradise, of Camden has confessed to being the head of a narcotic ring operating throughout South Jersey, it was declared yesterday by Captain John Golden, head of the city detective bureau.

Paradise Also admitted that he is a drug addict, Golden said, making the fact known when he became ill in his cell at the city jail and calling for Dr. W.G. Bailey, who has been treating him for the drug habit.

With three other men, who are accused as accomplices, Paradise is being held for a preliminary hearing in Police Court tomorrow morning. The four men, Golden said, will probably be held without bail pending grand jury action and be committed to the Camden County Jail. At the jail, detainers will be lodged against the quartette by Federal narcotics agents, who co-operated with city and county authorities in the investigation, which resulted in the arrests.

Golden declared that city detectives had purchased more than $500 worth of drugs from Paradise and his agents, in obtaining evidence against the ring, which authorities said reaches into Atlantic City and other South Jersey communities as well as Camden.

The three men arrested with Paradise are James Mucci, 18 years old, of 324 Stevens Street, Rocco DeCord, 21 years old, of 221 Spruce Street, and Andrew Hill, of Locust Street, near Kaighn Avenue. According to the detectives, the base of operations of the “ring” was in the Third Ward. Mucci and DeCord were arrested in a barbershop at Third and Locust streets, three blocks from the Wiley M. E. Church where the pastor, Rev. John S. Hackett, recently exposed vice conditions existing in the Third ward and assailed the Department Public Safety for laxity. The arrest of Paradise and the others is believed to be a result of the result of the clergyman’s scathing sermons.

Paradise and Hill were arrested several hours before the other two men. Fearing that they get word to other members of the “ring” police took the two men to Merchantville police headquarters, where Assistant Prosecutor Joseph Varbalow and Chief County Detective Lawrence T. Doran were waiting. Statements were obtained from the two, and meanwhile Mucci and DeCord were taken into custody. Paradise, who is 34 years old, served a year In State Prison five years ago for selling narcotics.

Detectives George Ward, Louis Shaw, and Thomas Cheeseman, of the city, and M.H.  Shapiro and J.H. McFadden, of the federal office in Philadelphia, arranged the purchase of a ‘deck” of heroin from Paradise, and ‘caught him with the goods’  when he met them at Nineteenth Street and River Road, near his, home at 927 North Nineteenth Street.

Paradise was in his expensive automobile when arrested. It was the machine he had used to distribute narcotics to his agents and addicts during the past few years, the detectives said.

Decks  of dope which sold for $1.50 each, police said, were placed in the automobile which was driven to a certain point as prearranged, and then Paradise would leave it parked, the detcrt1ves said.

Peddling Scheme Bared

At a  stated hour an agent or addict would approach the machine, take the “dope” inside, and leave money as payment. Paradise would return and collect the money received, it was said.

That the ring extended to Philadelphia, New York, and other large Eastern cities was indicated by the many times the automobile was parked at Camden bridge plaza for hours, when exchanges would be made, the detectives said.  


Camden Courier-Post * January 10, 1928

SHEIK SWINDLES HER, WOMAN CLAIMS HERE
Camden Victim Says Jailed Lothario, 60, Took $4200, Vanished

“He got my money, I got the air.”

That was the grim cry of a Camden woman who accused a suitor of mulcting her of $4200.

The gay Lothario, some 60-odd years, is John H. Lesser, of 712 South 29th Street, Harrisburg PA, who today starts a three-year term in the Moyamensing Prison, Philadelphia.  He is also knows as Victor Reichel, Charles H. Lesser, and Alfred May.

Lesser was sentenced to three years and fined  $500 and the cost of prosecution by Judge Walter Davidson, of Franklin County, who substituted in Philadelphia Quarter Sessions Court, on the charges of two Philadelphia women.

The ‘sheik” has also been identified by Mrs. Anna Wenghofler, 48 years old of 1281 Mechanic Street, as the man who secured her savings from her on a promise of marriage, and then disappeared. 

Mrs. Wengholfer, the mother of three grown children, swore out a warrant four years ago for the arrest of Lesser, or Reichel, as he was known in Camden, on a charge of larceny as bailee. He was later indicted by the Camden county grand jury, but was never found until yesterday. 

Today, Camden County authorities are arranging for the extradition of Reichel to this state upon the completion of his sentence to face trial on the Camden widow’s charges. 

Lesser, or Reichel, was arrested in Pittsburg when he was recognized in a hotel lobby by Mrs. Helen Meier, an actress and married daughter of Mrs. Marie Gottschild, a widow of 2320 Bouvier Street, Philadelphia. Mrs. Gottschild had previously sworn out a warrant charging Lesser with obtaining money under false pretences.       

He was placed on trial yesterday before Judge Davidson on complaint of both Mrs. Gottschild and another Philadelphia woman, Mrs. Ida Hoelke, 3001 North 5th Street. Both women allege that he interested them in a restaurant business after courting them during June of 1926.

He obtained $1500 from Mrs. Gottschild and $600 from Mrs. Hoelke, it was alleged. He was found guilty and sentence was imposed.

While he was being led back to the sheriff’s cellroom, Lesser came face to face with Mrs. Wenghofler, who had been taken to Philadelphia by Camden County Detective Howard Smith.

“I know him,” grimly asserted the Camden widow. “I would know him anywhere. I recognized him in the courtroom when he was with a number of other prisoners.”

Lesser turned to a guard, and exclaimed.

Denies Knowing Her

“I don’t know this woman. I never saw her before.”

“Well, I know you,” replied Mrs. Wenghofler.

The alleged love-making swindler was then arraigned before Magistrate Pennock and held without bail for extradition to New Jersey.

Police declare that Lesser has mulcted numerous women throughout the East by promises of marriage. Another Philadelphia woman, Mrs. Anna Graffe, of Park Avenue near Master Street, claims she gave him $3,000 for their “future home”. She told police she accepted him as husband-to-be, and he afterward too her to Baltimore and showed her a house which he said he wanted to buy for them. He finally prevailed upon her to “advance” him the money for its purchase, she said.

About five years ago an advertisement appeared in local newspapers. It was worded as follows:

“Bachelor, in business; good character, considerable savings, 48, wants to marry maiden or widow fond of home, should likewise have something saved. Reply with full particulars.”

Mrs. Wenghofler told police hat she replied out of curiosity, and Lesser went to her home. He represented himself to be Victor Reichel, and said he was a Philadelphia real estate broker.

He ardently wooed her, finally proposed, and she finally agreed to marry him. He then went with her to the City Hall, procured a marriage license, and they made plans for the wedding.

Finds Ideal Home 

Then, according to the widow, he told her he found a house which would make an ideal home, but that he was unable finance its purchased at that moment. He finally wheedled $4,200 form her, she said. He then disappeared. 

Chief of Detectives Lawrence T. Doran recognized the description of Lesser when he was captured in Pittsburgh PA, and sent Detectives Cleary and Smith to identify the man. Fingerprints were taken and found to conform with those taken from articles belonging to Reichel and held by the Camden woman. 

Detectives also declare that three Baltimore women have made complaints in that city of Lesser’s activities, declaring that he swindled them on promises of marriage. The ‘shiek” also worked in Boston MA and other cities, it is alleged.


Camden Courier-Post * January 14, 1928

GANGSTER SHOT DURING MELEE IN SIXTH WARD

Joseph Devon Held On Murder Charge After Death
Boxer’s Brother; ‘Mose’ Flannery and 4 Others Held as Witnesses; Was Craps Game Says County Police
HOLDUP ATTEMPTED CITY COPS DECLARE

Victim of a shot fired in a melee, the exact cause of which remain undetermined, Joseph Cimini, 31 years old, ‘was killed in the Sixth Ward Republican Club, 908 Broadway.

Cimini, declared by police to be a Philadelphia gangster, was killed before the eyes of two district detectives, Clarence Arthur and Clarence Bunker, who had been summoned to the club by warning that a fight was in progress.

Joseph Devon, 28 years old, known to his associates as “Polack Joe’” and a colorful figure in Third Ward politics, fired the shot that killed Cimini.

Declaring that he had fired in self-defense, after Cimini struck him with the butt of a revolver, Devon was locked up without bail on a charge of murder.

Jospeh 'Mose’ Flannery, 26 years old, picturesque Eighth ward political worker, was held as a material witness. Detectives had seized Flannery who was to have precipitated the battle by brandishing a revolver just before Cimini was shot. The officers say that Flannery fled –after the shooting and was captured afterward at Broadway and Federal Street.

The name of the dead man was given as Joseph Gannon, but shortly before one o’clock this afternoon, he was identified as Joseph Cimini, 1301 Ellsworth Street, Philadelphia. The identification was made by a brother, William Cimini, a pugilist who has boxed in this city several times under the name of “Billy” Gannon.

Six Others Quizzed

Six other men who were present at the time of the shooting, or when the argument began, were questioned by city and county detectives.

They are Newton Blanchard, 30, 923 St. John Street, former Camden boxing referee and declared by some of the witnesses as the man who conducted the crap game at the club; Michael Dandrea, 26, 1067 Norris Street; Russell Sage, 26 years old, of 1102 Marion Street a taxicab driver who is said to have driven Gannon and Flannery to the club in his car; Maurice O’Brien, 27 years old, of 1429 Bradley Avenue, a former New Jersey State Trooper, Harry Trooper, Harry Waterhouse, 28 years old, whose address was given as the same as Sage’s; and Charles “Chick” Hunt, 27 years old, of 1218 Broadway, a former Camden boxer. Blanchard and Dandrea were released after questioning and after each had made a statement to Chief of County Detective Lawrence T. Doran. The others were held with Flannery as material witness.

Headquarters of the Sixth Ward Republican Club on Broadway below Spruce Street is shown in the picture. The entrance is to the left, the first floor front being occupied by a barber shop. The arrow indicates the room where the shooting occurred.

Slayer and Slain

Top: Joseph Devon - Bottom: Joseph Cimini

Differences of opinion between county and city detectives investigating the shooting were heightened during the afternoon.  The county sleuths insisted upon the theory that the shooting had resulted from a feud between Flannery and Hunt, with Cimini taking the former’s side and Devon the latter and said that the heat of the argument had possibly been heightened by disagreement over a crap came.

The city police, on the other hand, declared that the entire affair was the result of an attempt by Flannery to hold up the other men. Devon’s statement to Chief Doran made no mention of a hold-up.

Building up a case against Flannery, the officers this afternoon lodged charges of attempted hold-up, carrying concealed deadly weapons, atrocious assault and battery and assault to kill against him. The two latter charges were made as the result of identification of Flannery as a participant in two recent robbery attempts. J.E. Feinstein, café proprietor of 508 Kaighn Avenue, declared that Flannery, Cimini, and Sage were thereof four men who held him up on New Year’s Day. He defied them and they left when he said, “Go ahead and shoot,” he asserted. Flannery was also identified, according to police, as the man who had beaten and attempted to rob Henry Mehrer, an Audubon policeman, and his two companions outside the Ringside Inn, on the Black Horse Pike, a fortnight ago. Mehrer and Feinstein were taken to police headquarters by County Detective Howard Smith, who is authority for the statement that they identified Flannery.

Cimini was shot shortly after 3:00 this morning and died almost instantly. Doctors at Cooper Hospital pronounced him dead on arrival. He had been shot just above the heart by a bullet from Devon’s gun.

Events preceding the shooting remain, to some extent clouded today. Chief Doran said he learned of an enmity existing between Flannery and Hunt. Devon appeared to have attempted to quiet “Mose”, the county detectives said. Cimini struck Devon and Devon fired.

Chief John Golden of the Camden city detective bureau stated, on the other hand, that the shooting had apparently followed an attempt to hold up the other men in the room. Golden based his view on the statements of Clarence Arthur, a city sleuth. According to Arthur, when he and Bunker appeared at the door of the room, Flannery and Cimini held revolvers and the other men in the room were standing with their hands upraised.

According to the story pieced together by county detectives from the statements of witnesses, a group of men had apparently gathered at the club for a crap game. Blanchard, it was stated, acts as the “stick man,” the term used in gambling parlance to designate the man who conducts a crap game.

City and County agree that Flannery and Cimini arrived together in Sage’s taxicab. Whether there was an argument, the result of an enmity between Flannery and Hunt, or whether the attempted hold-up theory is correct, remains to be learned by additional official investigation.

Chief Doran stated the witnesses had told him that words passed between Flannery and Hunt and that the former had gone downstairs. Returning he brandished a revolver.

Two Flee Place

It was at this point that Blanchard and Dandrea left the room and fled down the stairs. On the street, they encountered Detectives Arthur and Bunker, who were patrolling Broadway in a police automobile.

In describing the subsequent events today, Arthur declared that Blanchard had informed him that “two Philadelphia gunmen are up in the Sixth Ward Club holding up a bunch of fellows”.

The detectives did not immediately go to the club, but found Patrolman Frank Del Rossi and followed him up the stairs of the building.

“There were about fifteen men in the room,” Arthur asserted. “When we got to the door Flannery and Cimini had their guns out and apparently were about to search the others. The other men had their hands in the air.

“When they saw us Flannery and Cimini threw their guns down and the others lowered their hands. I went up to Flannery and started to frisk him. Bunker went to another man, whom I don’t know, and started to frisk him”.

It was then he said that he heard the shot. Believing that it was Bunker who was shot, he released his hold on Flannery and swung around. As he did Flannery turned and fled downstairs, Arthur declared.

Bunker said he believed that it was Arthur who had been shot and he too released his grasp on the man he had been searching. The detectives turned in time to see Cimini fall.

“I did it! I shot him!” Devon is declared to have shouted, throwing his revolver on the table.

According to the story told by witnesses to the county detectives, however, Devon had stepped up to Flannery just before the shot was fired and had said” “Mose, you can’t get away with this here.”

Flannery is said to have had a gun in his hand at the time.

As Devon spoke, the witnesses say, Cimini stepped behind him and struck him with the butt of a revolver. Just then detectives entered. Devin whirled and, drawing his gun, fired.

Cimini was placed in a police ambulance and taken to the hospital. After he had been pronounced dead his body was taken to the morgue, where it was awaiting identification today. Neatly dressed, Cimini is of Italian extraction. He has coal-black hair, brown eyes and a dark complexion. Coroner Charles T. Murray will perform a post-mortem examination, he said.

Flannery Captured

When he fled from the club, according to Arthur, Flannery jumped on a Public Service bus driven by David Smith, of 423 Haddon Avenue, which was passing at the time.

“Faster! Faster” he is declared to have urged Smith as the latter drove along Broadway in the direction of Federal Street.

At Federal Street and Broadway, Arthur and Bunker caught up to the bus and arrested Flannery as he descended from the vehicle.

“Why don’t you give me a chance to get to Philadelphia?” Arthur declares Flannery asked him. “I can get bail over there.”

Seek Written Statement

Chief Doran stated this afternoon that he was attempting to obtain a written statement from Flannery and would also seek to have Devon sign a statement regarding the shooting. During the morning, Flannery refused to talk while Devin, although admitting that he fired the shot, declared that he shot in self-defense. He made no reference to the hold-up attempt, according to the county detectives.

Cimini has a Philadelphia police record but, according to his pugilist brother, “was not bad but just wild.” He was recently arrested in Philadelphia after a fight with policemen.

“But he never held up or robbed anybody,” his brother declared this afternoon after identifying the body. “He got into a jam now and then. Yes, I know that he knew 'Mose' Flannery, but I never mixed with that crowd.”

It was reported at City Hall this afternoon that Samuel Orlando had been retained as attorney for Flannery and that Walter Keown, Camden county solicitor, would represent all the other men. The presence of Keown at detective headquarters, during which he had a conference with Captain Golden, seemed to lend credence to the latter report but neither rumor could be confirmed.

Flannery for years has figured in police cases and in political warfare in the Eighth Ward, where he was sometimes a lieutenant and sometimes an opponent of “Mikey” Brown, the Republican leader of the ward. Last March he was arrested and indicted on charges of atrocious assault and battery on is wife and her mother. At one time he was held as a suspect is a Philadelphia shooting but later was released.

The accused man, Devon, is a short, slim little man with an air of meek complaisance. He has been a taxicab driver and was last arrested on a charge of drunken driving. In May of 1926 he attempted suicide by shooting himself after he had failed to effect a reconciliation with his estranged wife. At that time, he shot himself but the bullet only grazed his chest.

Joe Devon, long a political power in the Third Ward, first flashed into citywide prominence in 1925, when he was employed by federal authorities as a deputy U.S. Marshal to guard the padlocked Poth brewery at Bulson Street, just off Broadway. At the time Devon was thus maintaining the sanctity of the Eighteenth Amendment, he was also operating a bootlegging establishment downtown and had been arrested once or twice for violating the Volstead Act.

The Courtier at that time exposed this paradoxical situation, with the result that the U.S. Marshal summarily dismissed Devon. He keenly resented the political chicanery that had been used to put Devon in office. In explaining how Devon was appointed, the Marshal said that he had been recommended by “prominent Republican leaders” in Camden, chief among whom was William D. Sayrs, no a city commissioner but then a field agent in the office of the Internal Revenue Department.

Sought City Job

Not long after Devon’s dismissal as brewery guard, Sayrs and other Republican leaders made strenuous efforts to secure a city job for him under the Non-Partisan administration. They sought to exact a promise from The Courier that this newspaper would remain silent in the event Devon was appointed to a city position. No such promise was made and Devon remained jobless, politically at least.

Then came a humorous twist to the situation. Sayrs disagreed with some of the Organization leaders and, for a time, walked his own political footpath. Some of the leaders, fearful of what Sayrs might attempt politically, killed two birds with one stone by hiring Joe Devon to shadow Sayrs and to report to them the number of times he conferred with Non-Partisans. Thus, Joe had a job and Billy was watched.

Sayrs knew he was being shadowed by his old friend, and apparently he knew who had hired Devon to do the work, but he refused to take the situation seriously and chortled, frequently, when he would see his “Shadow” trailing about town.

In the last year, however, Devon has again been the particular political protégé of Commissioner Sayrs and also has won the friendship of many other political leaders. Nevertheless, he has not been, so far as can be determined, the recipient of any particular political patronage, though his political influence in the Third and Fifth Wards is said to have expanded rapidly under the new administration.


Camden Courier-Post - February 28, 1928

BANK EMBEZZLER JOKES WHEN TAKEN TO COUNTY PRISON
Garrett Waives Reading of Indictment for $19000 Systematic Thefts;
His Wife Remains Loyal, Discrediting His Confession

Laughing at photographers who tried to snap a picture as he covered his face with his hat and joking with the officers who accompanied him, Burd S. Garrett, for seven years a teller employed by the East End Trust Company was taken from the West Jersey Hospital this morning at 11:15 to the County Courthouse.

When arraigned before Justice of the Peace Peter J. Wallace in the office of Lawrence T. Doran, chief of county detectives he waived reading and hearing of the complaint charging him with embezzlement of $19,000 of the bank’s funds.

Less than ten minutes after he had entered Chief Doran's office, the confessed embezzler, accompanied by Detective William Cleary, reappeared and walked to the county jail where he was committed .

Prosecutor Ethan P. Wescott did not attend the arraignment and it was expected that he would set Garrett's bail sometime this afternoon, when he would announce his intentions as to presentment of the case to the grand jury.

Garrett, who according to Assistant Prosecutor Joseph A. Varbalow admitted manipulation of the bank funds, which he lavished on his wife and the six children he had instructed from birth in the principles of honesty, appeared unmoved this morning by the proceedings.

His face has regained the color it had lost when detectives first began questioning him, as he lay in a coma on a cot at the hospital last Saturday. Since Sunday afternoon, when he broke down and admitted the charges against him, he has chatted with his constable guard.

 Garrett’s appearance today was that of a businessman in comfortable circumstances. He was well dress, in a gray suit, dark overcoat, and wore a light gray soft felt hat His eyes, behind tortoise shell glasses, were bright, and minus the stare of three days ago. 

His wife, despite his reported confession reiterated her belief today that “it can’t be true.” Firmly declaring that she used economic measures in her housekeeping


Camden Courier-Post - April 2, 1928

TWO MEN, GIRL KILLED, 40 HURT IN CAR CRASHES
Williamstown Farmer Hurled Into Swamp, Dies
Shortly After being Rescued

CHILD RUN DOWN BY AUTO HURRYING TO HOSPITAL
Four Hit-Run Drivers Sought; Train Demolishes Sedan At Crossing



...continued...
Louisa Del Rossi belonged to the family of Camden policeman Clifford Del Rossi

Camden Evening Courier - September 18, 1928
...continued...

...continued...
...continued...

...continued...

David Hunt - Thomas Cheeseman - Walter Smith - Rox Saponare
|John W. Golden
- Howard Pike Samuel Johnson - Lewis Stehr  
William Beottcher
- George Ward - Louis Shaw - Frank Malec
Lawrence T. Doran - Samuel P. Orlando - Louis Shectman
Mrs. Mary Brown -
Polack Joe Deven - Frank Smith - Walter Selby
Walter Wartmann - Charles Foulk - Mrs. Edward McGrath
Father John J. Henry -
Joseph "Mose" Flannery"  Joseph Moll
James Bonner -
William Bonner  - James L. Hawkins
Walter Novak - Joseph Novak -
Garfield Del Duca - Eugene Murphy
Russell Sage - Patrick Driscoll - Joseph "Cuzzy" Scarduzio


Camden
Evening Courier

September 18, 1928


Camden Evening Courier - September 19, 1928

...continued...

...continued...

...continued...

John Kowal  
Lewis Stehr
 
John Skolski
John W. Golden 

James Hollis
Clarence Arthur 
Frank Moll
Clarence Bunker
Thomas Cheeseman

Sylvester McGrath
Lawrence T. Doran
Dr. David S. Rhone
William D. McDonaldson
Frank Leonard
Father McCorriston
Patrick Driscoll

Joseph "Mose" Flannery"  - Joseph Moll - James Bonner  
William Bonner
  - Rita Leslie  James L. Hawkins - Hotel Royal
Walter Novak - Joseph Novak -
Garfield Del Duca
Eugene Murphy - Russell Sage - Joseph "Cuzzy" Scarduzio
Front Street -
Kaighn Avenue - Fairview Street - South 3rd Street
Camden High School - West Jersey Hospital - Sacred Heart Church


Camden Courier-Post - September 20, 1928

ORLANDO AFTER SLOT MACHINE 'RACKET' CHIEF
Assistant Prosecutor to Get Higher-ups in Distribution Plan
13 GAMBLING DEVICES TAKEN BY DETECTIVES
Grand Jury Today Gets Evidence in Surprise Raids

...continued...
...continued...
Samuel P. Orlando - Ethan P. Wescott - Samuel M. Shay  
Lawrence T. Doran - D. Auletto - Peter Bernardo - Earl Sanderson
Max Beals - Betty Leopold - Frank Delgarzo - Antonio Auduint
South 2nd Street - South 3rd Street - South 8th Street - Line Street
Clinton Street - Mickle Street - Spruce Street - Stevens Street

Camden Courier-Post - April 10, 1930
South 9th Street - Atlantic Avenue - West Jersey Hospital

Camden Morning Post - December 1, 1930

Camden Evening Courier - December 13, 1930

...continued...
...continued...
...continued...
...continued...
...continued...

Lawrence T. Doran - Charles V. Dickinson - Clifford Baldwin
Walter Mattison - Howard Smith -
George A. Ward - Jeff Kay - Alfred Shires
Harry Kyler - Archie Reese -
Walter Smith - Harry Cattell - Earl Rider
Charles F. Smith - Charles H. Smith -
John Toal - John Taylor - Frank Carle
Oscar Thompson Highland Worsted Mills - North Camden - State Street
Moore Street -
Chestnut Street

Camden Courier-Post - August 24, 1931
Robert Ashenfelter
Benjamin Simon
Charles Rettberg

American Stores
Robert Ashenfelter
Charles Rettberg 
Benjamin Simon
Pierce Avenue
North 32nd Street

Click on Image to Enlarge


Camden Courier-Post - August 24, 1931

...continued...
...continued...
...continued...
...continued...
Robert Ashenfelter - Lawrence T. Doran
 Charles Rettberg - Theodore Rettberg - James Melbourne aka Melvin James
John Golden - Frank Evans - Gus Koerner - Charles Wainwright
Benjamin Simon - Joseph Shreeve - Elwood Humphreys - Louis Schlam
Richard Donnelly - Charles Johnson - Lewis Smith - Charles Schultz
North 36th Street - Pierce Avenue - North 32nd Street - Bergen Avenue

 

 

 

 

Camden
Courier-Post
August 24, 1931


 

 


Cleveland Plain Dealer - August 25, 1931



Camden Courier-Post * August 25, 1931
...continued...
...continued...
Robert Ashenfelter - Lawrence T. Doran
  Charles Rettberg - Theodore Rettberg - James Melbourne aka Melvin James
John Golden - Frank Evans - Benjamin Simon - Louis Schlam
Richard Donnelly - Clifford A. Baldwin - Gordon L. McRae - Emmalinda Canilus
North 36th Street - Pierce Avenue - North 32nd Street - Bergen Avenue
Beideman Avenue

Camden Courier-Post * August 25, 1931

Two of the three purported accomplices of the burglar slain by police yesrerday, and the young woman whose statements helped to implicate them, are shown in the above  photographs. Above are James Melbourne, center, and Theodore Rettberg, left. The latter is a brother of Charles Rettberg, 1189 North 36th Street, shot in a gun battle yesterday with Detective Robert Ashenfelter, who was seriously wounded, and Policeman Frank Evans. Miss Emmalinda Canilus, a material witness, is shown at right. Melbournea and Rettberg confessed to planning the robber with the youth who was slain, the police say., 



Camden Courier-Post August 26, 1931

Gordon McCrae
Theodore Rettberg
James Melbourne

 


Camden Courier-Post * August 26, 1931

 
...continued...
...continued...
Robert Ashenfelter - Lawrence T. Doran
  Charles Rettberg - Theodore Rettberg - James Melbourne aka Melvin James
John Golden - Frank Evans - Benjamin Simon - Louis Schlam
Richard Donnelly - Clifford A. Baldwin - Gordon L. McRae - Emmalinda Canilus
Mrs. Emma Bowden - Dr. H. Wesley Jack
North 36th Street - Pierce Avenue - North 32nd Street - Beideman Avenue

Camden Courier-Post - October 21,1931

'Gibbons' Free After 46 Days 'Extra Time'
Judge Shay Calls Holding of Impersonator An Outrage

Declared to have been illegally detained in Camden County jail, Henry Luellowitz, 28, of Los Angeles, who posed as Floyd Gibbons, was ordered released yesterday by Judge Samuel M. Shay.

A writ of habeas corpus, served at the office of Sheriff E. Frank Pine, charged Luellowitz had been kept prisoner 46 days after his 90-day sentence had expired. The man was sentenced June 13, by Police Court Judge Pancoast, on a charge of im­personating the famed radio announcer after his arrival here by plane.     

He was detained following expiration of his sentence, on a detainer from New Haven, Connecticut, where he was accused of having defaulted payment of a hotel bill.

According to Rocco Palese, assistant prosecutor, and Chief of County Detectives Lawrence T. Doran, Luellowitz was held in connection with an investigation of the escape from jail of Albert Rumford, 23, of Philadelphia. The latter cut his way from a cell adjoining Luellowitz last August 17.

Wanted Poster for Albert Rumford - August 1931

Calls Case Outrage

In dismissing the prisoner, Judge Shay declared the case was "an outrage," ruling that the man was kept "through somebody's oversight." Luellowitz criticized the prosecutor's office upon his release, saying his detention was occasioned by his refusal to "become a goat in the investigation of Rumford's escape." He praised prison attaches and Warden Edmund B. Powell, for treatment accorded him in the jail.

Frank M. Lario, attorney, who started proceedings to affect Luellowitz' release, told Judge Shay yesterday that the man had been detained without a hearing after his sentence had expired. He charged that following service of the writ last week, Luellowitz was rushed by county detectives to the office of Peter J. Wallace, justice of the peace, and then recommitted to his cell.

Judge Shay sent for Justice of the Peace Wallace who admitted he ordered the man's commitment after a hearing at which only the detectives appeared as witnesses.

The jurist declared he was convinced Luellowitz had been kept in jail through oversight of someone.

"The New Haven authorities have had ample time to come for the man. I don't care now whether they want him or not. This man cannot be punished for some one's negligence. I order his release immediately."

Says He Was 'Goat'

Following his dismissal, Luellowitz said he had been questioned about the escape of Rumford, alleged bandit, for whose capture the county has offered a $200 reward. Luellowitz and another inmate were said to have made noise while the jailbreak was being made.

"It's an outrage, the way I was treated by the prosecutor's office. Warden Powell and the jailers were mighty nice but the prosecutor and sheriff wanted to have a goat when that guy escaped and I was the first one they reached for.

"But I wasn't going to let them make a goat of me. It wasn't my fault if they didn't have enough jailors there and they couldn't blame me if that guy got away."

Assistant Prosecutor Palese said Luellowitz was detained because he was suspected of having aided Rumford to escape. He admitted the man was not legally committed.


Camden Courier-Post - October 23, 1931

Political Paragraphs

A. Harry Moore, Democratic candidate for governor, is scheduled to speak at the meeting of Gloucester Democrats in the city hall there next. Wednesday night. The meeting will be in charge of Mayor J. Emerson Jackson and the county Democratic committee.

Gloucester Republicans tonight will hold a. rally at the headquarters of the city committee, 104 North King Street.

The Polish-American Women's Citizens Club, in its recent resolution pledging support to David Baird, endorsed a candidate for the first time in the club's six-year history, according to Mrs. Priscilla Ciechanowski, secretary. The club is two to one for Baird, she said. Other officers are Mrs. A. Bec, president; Mrs. H. Stojak, vice-president, and Mrs. A. Skierska, treasurer.

A huge new sign, in vivid lettering, has appeared on the east side or Admiral Wilson Boulevard, south of Baird Boulevard, urging a vote for Baird November 3. It is one of the largest campaign signs in Camden County.

Congressman Charles A. Wolverton is appearing almost everywhere with Baird. The congressman is one of the gubernatorial nominee's ablest campaign advisers. He was with the candidate at the Trenton convention of the New Jersey Taxpayers' Association Wednesday.

David Tattersdill, Broadway merchant, is among the latest members of the Speakers' Bureau at Republican headquarters, Broadway and Stevens Street. He is one of the organizers of the Forty-second Street Baird Boosters' Club.

Seventy-two hundred applications for challengers were received Tuesday afternoon, the deadline, by the Camden County Board of Elections. Of the total, 4000 were for challengers for Republican candidates and the remainder for Democratic candidates, including those seeking office as governor, freeholder, justice of the peace and various borough and township offices. No Socialist or prohibition applications for challengers were filed here.

Joseph A. Varbalow, former assistant prosecutor, was so eager to read Moore's speech he had to borrow a cent from Chief of County Detectives Lawrence T. Doran to buy the Morning Post.


Philadelphia Inquirer - March 21, 1932
...continued...
George R. Thompson - Fenwick Road - Constitution Road - Morse Street
Clifford A. Baldwin - Harold Gondolf - Peter Gondolf - Lawrence T. Doran
George Hall - Morgan Boulevard - South 7th Street - South 8th Street

Camden Courier-Post * March 28, 1932

COUPLE ARRESTED AFTER 24 HOUR VIGIL
Fight Interrupts Hearing; Estranged Husband Has Apartment Watched

Arrested last night as they left an apartment at 727 Penn Street, Rayfield Hartman, 38, of that address, and Mrs. Jean Everett, 35, of 111 East Franklin Avenue. Collingswood, were held in $300 bail on statutory charges by Justice of the Peace Frank Sheridan.

The couple was arrested by Detective Frank Miller, who had kept a watch on the apartment for 24 hours, at the request of the woman's estranged husband, Harry Everett, formerly of Euclid Avenue, now of Montgomeryville, Pa.

Hartman and Mrs. Everett first were arraigned before Sheridan in the Federal building. Both had been drinking, according to Sheridan, and Hartman attempted to hit Miller. Sounds of the fight reached post office employees downstairs and they ran upstairs with drawn pistols, believ­ing a holdup in progress.

Sheridan committed the couple to the county jail until they became quiet, when the hearing was held at Sheridan's home, 941 Elm Street.

Two months ago Mrs. Everett was fined $200 for drunken driving in Gloucester, and in 1930 she was fined $75 for possession of liquor after a raid on her home by Chief of County Detectives Lawrence T. Doran.  


Camden Courier-Post * June 9, 1932

...continued...
...continued...
...continued...
Joseph Hillop - Abe Fuhrman - Broadway - Clifford A. Baldwin - Arthur Holl
Lawrence T. Doran - Jules Derowski - Harry Ireton - Wilfred Dube - Ray Osborne
Joe Bielec - Frank Rock - Tommy Reilly - Alfred Ripka - Louie Frank
Howard Ripka - Frankie Ripka - Lena Hillop - Anna Hillop - John Kelly

Camden Courier-Post
June 11, 1932

Clifford A. Baldwin
Lawrence T. Doran
Joseph Hillop
Anna Hillop - Lena Hillop


Camden Courier-Post * June 17, 1932

...continued...
...continued...
...continued...
Mickey Duffy - Clifford A. Baldwin - Lawrence T. Doran

Camden Courier-Post
June 17, 1932

 

Camden Courier-Post * February 2, 1933

HUSBAND DUPED, JAILED

Lured to Camden from Philadelphia by his wife on the pretext that his three-year-old daughter was ill, Lucien Mutel, 24, of 108 Browning Lane, Bellmawr, was arrested early yesterday on the charge of desertion and non-support. He is in the county jail in default of $500 bail.

According to his wife, Ruth, Mutel walked out of the house on January 3 and went to Philadelphia to seek work. He obtained a job as a waiter but did not return home. His wife  complained to County Detective Lawrence T. Doran and a warrant was issued for Mutel.

Tuesday night Mrs. Mutel telephoned her husband that their daughter, Dorothy, was ill and Mutel hurried from Philadelphia to his home in Bellmawr. When he arrived borne he found William Burtis, constable, waiting for him. Mutel was arrested and given a hearing before Justice of the Peace Peter J. Wallace. Unable to furnish bail, he was committed to jail.


Camden Courier-Post * February 7, 1933

Palese Peddles Tickets For His Own Testimonial

Selling tickets for his own testimonial dinner is a distinction enjoyed by Assistant Prosecutor Rocco Palese.

The dinner, arranged as a testimonial to "the Polish Ambassador," proved a surprise to Palese last night when 28 friends, members of the "Srelsihc Club," let him share the secret in Hotel Walt Whitman.

The dinner, among other reasons, was tendered him because he was the only member of the club to put together a Courier-Post "Hi-Ho" puzzle. For a week prior to the affair he sold tickets to friends, not knowing the affair was in his honor.

With former Judge John B. Kates as toastmaster, wit and repartee passed the festive board, while entertainment was furnished by Bobby Heath and Billy James, famous writers of popular songs.

Those who did honor to Palese are: Judge Kates, Prosecutor Clifford A. Baldwin, Chief of County Detectives Lawrence T. Doran, John R. DiMona, Carl Kisselman, Herbert H. Blizzard, Robert Brest, Charles F. Knapp, Edward V. Martino, William Freeman, William Duby, Louis J. Gale,. Edward Gorman, John J. Fitzgerald, City Commissioner Clay W. Reesman, Anthony Maltesta, F. J. Haws, Edward Neuman, Clifford Stratton, Jules Derowski, Bronislaw Derowski, Richard Troncone, T. Harry Rowland, William F. Lehman, William McDonald, Judge Frank F. Neutze and Robert W Saeger. 


Camden Courier-Post * June 1, 1933

EX-CONVICT JAILED AFTER LEAVING HOSPITAL
Man Who Refuses to Tell How He Was Shot Had Narrow Escape

William Warren Groves, ex-convict found shot in Clementon May 16, was committed to' the county jail yester­day in default of $1000 bail after his release from Cooper Hospital.

Groves, 33 and a resident of Bloomfield, was given a hearing before Justice of the Peace Peter J. Wallace charged with being a material witness in his own shooting.

There was no testimony and the prisoner seemed surprised when he learned he was to go to jail. He looked wan and weak from the wound, which doctors for days feared would prove fatal.

Chief of County Detectives Lawrence T, Doran said he believed that a stay in prison might induce Groves to talk. So far, the wounded man has persistently refused to do so.

"He has been 'playing Simple,''' said Doran. “He pretends he doesn't know where he was shot, or why, or by whom. It's still my opinion he was wounded, while attempting a burglary. I thought he would be safer in the county jail for a while, rather than in the hospital where he might walk out. I want to question him further."

Groves still wore the bloodstained suit he had on the morning he stumbled onto the front porch of Charles Ridge's home on the Berlin Road and Delaware Avenue, Clementon.


Camden Courier-Post * June 2, 1933

MAN HELD IN N.Y. INDICTED HERE AS STOCK SWINDLER
Grand Jury Returns 45 True Bills to Judge Samuel M. Shay
MANY CHARGES COVERED

Now in Tombs Prison, New York, Frank Osborne, 32, alleged Camden stock embezzler, was one of 45 persons named yesterday in indictments, returned by the April grand jury.

Osborne, alias Allen Drake, is being held in the New York prison at the request of Camden authorities.

The indictments, first of the April jury term, were returned before Judge Samuel M. Shay in Common Pleas Court. 

Eleven true bills were impounded.

It is reported the charges contained in them are of a minor nature and name persons at present fugitives from justice.

E. Chester Ridgway, Sr., of Haddon Heights, woolen manufacturer, is foreman of the jury.

Osborne is charged with embezzlement. He is accused specifically of fleecing a Camden business man out of 534 shares of Cities Service' stock, valued at $1,602.

According to Chief of County Detectives Lawrence T. Doran, who caused Osborne's arrest in New York, the suspect operated a stock racket in Camden under the trade name of the "R. E. Stoddard Company" and swindled Camden and suburban business men.

Other indictments made public follow:

Robbery: Russell Grady, alias "Spencer” of Camden. Grady is alleged to have stolen $10 from Max Kleinfield January 28th.

Embezzlement: Frank Osborne, alias Allen Drake, of Camden, charged with embezzling 534 shares of common stock of the Cities Service Company, valued at $1602, on January 24.

Breaking, entering and larceny: James Cox, of Clementon; William H. Shinn, of Haddon Township, Charles Joslyn, Dominic Croge and Anthony Scott, all of Camden, named jointly. Harold Walters, William Kirk and George Walters, all of Pennsauken Township, named jointly.

Larceny and receiving stolen goods: Joseph Smitka and Theodore Jakucki, alias Theodore Chaney, both of Camden, named jointly. Ignatz Jaroshuk, of Camden, who is alleged to have taken $850 belonging to Peter Kracyzk, on February 25.

Larceny, receiving stolen goods and  larceny as bailee: John F. Cook, of Camden.

Receiving stolen goods: Spencer Murry, of Camden, alleged to have received $2000 worth of stolen copper templates from the Camden Pottery Company.

Obtaining money under false pretense: Samuel B. Stevenson, alias Samuel Ward, of Berlin.

Atrocious assault and battery: Charles Atkins, of Camden.

Assault and battery: William Di Paolo, alias Dip Di Paolo, of Haddon Heights, William Baxter; Jr., of Haddon Heights, Wladislaw Zineszki, of Camden, Nicholas Sakolonis, of Camden, I. J. Lewis, of Camden.

Statutory offenses: Walter Hart, of Camden; James Vennell, of Camden; Nick Simone, Jr., of Camden, and Raymond Ballinger, of Waterford Township.

Tampering with a meter: Joseph Perpetuino, of Camden; John Seick, of Barrington; Reuben Mitchell, of Gloucester Township, and Harry F. Clipper, of Haddon Township.

Non-support or desertion: James Morgan, of Camden, George Raymond Sykes, of Camden; Ernest Herman, of Camden; Frank J. Gaten, of Camden; Barney Cahill, of Gloucester; Anthony Debouno, of Waterford Township; Charles Jerome Sheppard, of Collingswood; Maurice Brinn, of Gloucester, and Philip Winter, of Camden. 


Camden Courier-Post - June 15, 1933

Mystery Raid Secrecy Ends At Gloucester 
Mayor Says Books Are Lost - But Prosecutor Has Names Revealed

A veil-of secrecy was thrown about the identity of five men arrested in a gambling house raid in Gloucester yesterday was lifted last night and the names released, purportedly on orders 'from Prosecutor Clifford A. Baldwin.'

Prosecutor Baldwin, County Detective Chief Lawrence T. Doran and two county detectives were "riding through Gloucester" yesterday when they noticed a man in a doorway at 427 Hudson street, signal someone of their presence. 

The county officials recalled several complaints about the establishment and decided the time ripe for a raid. About 20 inmates made the same decision at the same time and escaped through windows, etc. But five men were not so quick.

They were lodged in Gloucester city jail to await hearings on charges of disorderly conduct. The hearings were held and Mayor J. Emerson Jackson fined each of the defendants $5 and costs of $3.50. But the mayor refused to divulge the names of those convicted. 

"They don't want their names in the paper," he told reporters. 

Asked what had become of the police docket, where all prisoners are "booked," the mayor replied: "Sergeant Warfield put the docket away and we can't find it."

He admitted this was a surprising thing to do and rarely, if ever, occurred. Several other requests to the mayor and to the police department all met with the same result- no names. 

Then, something happened- the names were apparently "found." 

"They were, according to Mayor Jackson: Wllliam Shindle, 40; of 427 Hudson street, the address of the raided establishment; Harry Cramer, 38, of 415 North Ninth Street, Camden; Harry Small, 43, of Tenth and Pine Streets, Philadelphia; Ellsworth Simmons, 48, of 544 Bergen Street, Gloucester, and William Brown, 38, of Westville.

Mayor Jackson said he had been requested "by the prosecutor," to reveal the names. 

At the, time of the arrests, the raiders found horse racing form sheets, betting charts and other gambling paraphernalia. Three telephones were in the place.


Camden Courier-Post - September 18, 1933

JOBLESS SON KILLS JAKE SCHILLER 
WHO SAVES BOY’S WIFE FROM GUN

SLAYER CRAZED BY SEPARATION, RELATIVES SAY
Dazedly Insists He Had No Intention of Shooting Sire
ESTRANGED WIFE SEEN IN SUICIDE TRY
Slain Man Long Was Prominent Figure in Camden Politics

Jacob Schiller, 72, for 45 years a political figure here, is dead, shot by his own son.

The slayer, William Schillcr, 30, a former summer policeman now unemployed, was held over today to the grand jury on a charge of murder. He made no comment whatever during his police court hearing.

A few hours later, young Schiller's wife, Augusta, whom he lad also tried to shoot, was found wandering through the city street, in all hysterical condition.

She had written a note which police believed showed intent to 

commit suicide, and had staggered dazedly through the streets last night. Both in her note and in her incoherent statements to detectives she declared she was to blame for the tragedy.

She said her father-in-law had tried to save her and was killed in the attempt.

 The slaying occurred Saturday night at the elder Schiller's home, 2420 Carman Street. It climaxed an estrangement between young Schiller and his wife, with "Jake" Schiller attempting to reconcile the couple.

Mrs. William Schiller, who had had her husband arrested several months ago, said she believed he had become mentally deranged, but Police Judge Pancoast was informed that an alienist had examined young Schiller in July and pronounced him sane.

Couple Separated

Young Schiller had been living with his father at the Carman Street address, while Mrs. Schiller has been residing with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. John I. Green, 409 North Thirty-seventh Street. The cause of the estrangement has no been revealed by police, but it is stated that young Schiller refused to consent to a reconciliation.

"Jake" Schiller was a Republican worker in the Twelfth ward for years, and was at the time or his death inspector of city street lights.

Were Alone it Home

The father and son were at home 9.00 p. m. Saturday night and apparently were quarreling when the young Mrs. Schiller, her brother-in-law and sister, Mr. and Mrs. William Miller and another sister, Mrs. Lottie Bennehler, reached the house.

"Don't come in here," the older Schiller shouted as they started to enter the front sun parlor. But Miller did enter and said young Schiller was clutching a revolver in his right hand. He declared he closed in on his brother-in-law and tried to wrench the revolver from him. Two shots rang out and the father fell to the floor.

Patrolman Joseph Keefe was standing at Twenty-fifth and Federal Streets when two boys ran up and told him there was a shooting at Twenty-fifth and Carman Street. He ran to the scene and said he reached there in time to see young Schiller shooting up the street at his wife.

Keefe said Schiller ran into the house when he saw him. Aided by Miller, Keefe overpowered Schiller and placed an iron claw on his right hand after disarming him.

Jacob Schiller Jr., another son, learning of the shooting, went to his father's home and took him to Cooper Hospital in a passing automobile As he was being taken into the hospital he failed to recognize City Detective Robert Ashenfelter and died five minutes later.

Expresses No Regret

Police Sergeant John Potter joined Keefe and Miller and they took young Schiller to police headquarters.

Keefe said the son expressed no regret at shooting his father.

At about 5 a, m. today, Policeman Keefe was patrolling his "beat" when he passed the Schiller home on Carman Street. He noticed the front door was standing open, and he went inside to investigate.

The officer saw a note on a smoking stand. Picking it up, he read:

"Dear Everybody:

 "Please forgive me ... You have all been so wonderful ... But I couldn't go on to see you all suffer for what is my fault ... Lottie was right ... He killed his father because of insane love for me ... But he didn't. I killed Pop and now am sending Bibs to jail for my weakness.

 "Tell him I love him and ask my poor mother and dad to forgive me. I should have done this long ago and saved everyone all this suffering ... I love Billy and I know he loves me but I am afraid he has been turned against me. But I forgive him for all.

 “Gussie"

 "Gussie" is Mrs. Schiller.

Finds 'Gussie’ Hysterical

Keefe ran to Federal Street, but could not see Mrs. Schiller.

Meanwhile, Constable Dugan of the Twelfth Ward, saw Mrs. Schiller walking on Federal Street near the Cooper River. She was mumbling to herself and was in a hysterical condition, Dugan said.

Dugan telephoned police headquarters. City Detectives Rox Saponare and Maurice DeNicoli went out Federal Street and took her back with them to detective headquarters. There they sought to quiet her, but she continually sobbed.

"I want to take the blame- if I hadn't gone to Pop's home he would be living now."

"Pop wanted to save me," she said. "and he was shot. I can't eat or sleep. I think I'm going crazy."

Later, she was permitted to return to the home.

Young Schiller had been held in the city jail over the weekend. Today he was taken into police court. He wore no necktie and carried a raincoat over his arm. He was rep resented by counsel, C. Lawrence Gregorio, who said he had been retained "by friends" to act as attorney for the accused man.

City detective Benjamin Simon had signed the complaint in which he charged "on information received” that Schiller did feloniously and with malice aforethought shoot and kill his father.

The complaint was read to him and Gregorio told him not to say any thing, as Judge Pancoast would enter a plea of "not guilty" in his behalf. This was done by the court and Schiller was then held without bail pending grand jury action. He was taken to the county jail.

Declared Sane

After the hearing, Mrs. Etta C. Pfrommer, acting overseer of the poor, told Judge Pancoast that on July 26, Dr. Harry Jarrett, Broadway and Cherry Street, well known alienist, had examined young Schiller and declared him sane. The examination was made on the request of Mrs. Schiller in police court on the previous day. At that time young Schiller had been released by the court in the custody of his father.

County Detective Chief Lawrence T. Doran, who was among the first to question young Schiller Saturday night, said the man did not seem repentant over what he had done. He said Schiller did not give authorities much information. According to Doran, young Schiller declared he had objected frequently to his father that he did not want his wife to come to their home.

"It doesn't seem possible," said young Mrs. Schiller some hours after the tragedy. "It seems as though it was only a dream. I don't seem to remember anything.

"Poor Bill. He must have been crazy. He idolized his father. You can blame this all on the depression. He has been without work since they eliminated summer policemen two years ago. He has been worried as a result of being unable to obtain work. Just recently he started to drink.

"Bill intended to shoot me but his father tried to get the gun away from him and I believe it went off accidentally. Nothing could convince me that Bill would shoot his father in cold blood.

"I went to his father's home last night to try to effect a reconciliation with my husband. He had been drinking."

Registered as Sober

The police docket at headquarters shows Schiller registered as sober. The entry was not made until 2.15 a. m., and the shooting occurred shortly after 9.30 p.m.

Relatives said the father had attempted for months to patch up the marital difficulties of the couple.

Young Schiller had been living lately with his sister, Mrs. Bennehler, 2530 Bank Street and his wife with her parents at 409 North Thirty-seventh Street. He formerly lived at that address with his wife. He was appointed a summer policeman in 1929 and served until they were all dismissed two years ago.

Coroner Holl and Dr. Edward B. Rogers, county physician, yesterday performed an autopsy on the senior Schiller's body and ascertained that death was due to an internal hemorrhage caused by a bullet wound of the upper portion of the abdomen. They said a .32-callbre revolver had been used in the shooting.

Camden Lodge of Elks will hold services tomorrow night at the Schiller home, at which time the body will be on view. The funeral will be private on Wednesday with burial in Evergreen Cemetery.

Judge Pancoast last night recalled that young Schiller was arrested two months ago after he had kept his wife a prisoner on a lot all night. At that time "Jake," as he was affectionately known to his friends, tried to act as a mediator between his son and daughter-in-law.

The young Mrs. Schiller at that time told Pancoast she believed her husband was deranged and asked permission to have him examined by physicians she would name. Pancoast released young Schiller in the custody at his father. The police judge said the examination had apparently not been made as no commitment papers had been sent through his office.

Few political workers were better known that "Jake” Schiller. He was born in Philadelphia and was brought to Camden in early life by his parents, who conducted a saloon near Twenty-third and Federal Streets. East Camden was then the town of Stockton and the scene of Saturday night's shooting was a farm. Schiller recalled to friends that he drove cows through a pasture on which his house now stands.

 He was originally a Democrat but became a Republican through persuasion of the late U. S. Senator David Baird and remained a friend of the former leader for 40 years.

 Schiller had been melancholy over the death of his wife on February 13 last, friends said.

 When his son was arrested he remarked to Pancoast:  What is next?"

Figured In Shaw Case

None was more in the public eye 35 years ago in South Jersey than Schiller. It was the that he figured prominently in one phase of the locally celebrated Shaw murder trial.

It was during the second trial of Eli Shaw for the murder of his mother and grandmother, Mrs. Anna Shaw and Mrs. Emma Zane. They were found shot to death in September, 1897, in their bedroom of their home on Line Street near Third. Detective John Painter had found a revolver hidden in the chimney, one of several points in the circumstantial evidence that resulted in the indictment of Shaw. He was then a widely known young man about town and his arrest caused a big sensation. As time drew near for the trial feeling was intense, for there were adherents for and against the son and grandson, those arguments often grew bitter.

Henry Sidney Scovel, then one of the prominent criminal lawyers of Camden county, was retained to defend Shaw. Scovel was son of James Matlack Scovel, himself one of the leading barristers of this section. When the trial of Shaw was under way the city was astounded when it was charged Scovel had tampered with the jury. It was Schiller who made the charge.

The trial stopped abruptly. Scovel emphatically denied the story of Schiller and demanded vindication. An indictment for embracery was returned and at a trial, which had Camden on the tip toe of expectancy for days, it developed there was absolutely nothing to verify the charge, and Scovel was acquitted. He acted in two subsequent trials of Shaw, the second being a disagreement and the third acquittal for the son and grandson of the slain women.

Schiller, strangely enough, in later years became friendly with Scovel and when the latter was prosecutor from 1905 to 1912, "Jake," as he was familiarly known, was usually to be found in the office at the courthouse. Scovel was then a white haired man of flowery speech and impressive personality who let bygones be bygones.

Long Excise Inspector

For more than 20 years Schiller was inspector of the Excise Commission in Camden. It was during the days when the principal object of the inspector apparently was to keep the saloonmen in line. He was considered pretty good at that job, by no means an unimportant one from the organization viewpoint. It was also during that period the city had its troubles enforcing the Sunday liquor laws. There were those who considered they had enough pull to keep their back or side doors open on the Sabbath to let in their regular thirsty trade. Some succeeded in getting by, but "Jake" had his own troubles in keeping the boys straight and sometimes causing their arrest, although that was not frequent by any means.

His reign as inspector, too, was in the halcyon days of free lunch and schooner beers. Saloonmen themselves were against the lunch idea eventually since it meant too much of a financial burden. Jake kept tabs on the recalcitrants so that the liquor dealers knew who was obeying the order and who was "cutting corners" to get some extra trade.

Schiller was virtually raised with the saloon trade since his father was one of the old time German beer garden owners here, having had a place at Fourth and Line Streets. That was in the days when that section was largely populated by the German, English and Irish families lately come from the motherlands. When he was a boy, Schiller entered the U. S. Navy and served several years. When he came out he went to the old Town of Stockton, now East Camden, where he opened a saloon on Federal Street near Twenty-fourth. At that period, some 45 years ago, Stockton seethed with politics and it was just as natural for a young man to get into the game as it was for a duck to swim. Jake at that period was a Democrat and during the battle in the middle 90's when the West Jersey Traction and the Camden Horse Railway Company were fighting for the rail franchises in the town he was a candidate for council from the old Second Ward. The late Robert Lee was the Republican candidate and won out by the narrow margin of two votes. In later years Schiller became a Republican and was elected a constable.

Never Ran From Scrap

Throughout his career Schiller never quite forgot his training In the navy, particularly with reference to boxing or fighting at the drop of a hat. He was a scrapper in his early years and never ran from a fight. That was just as true in political battles, frequent then around the polls, as in purely personal matters. And Jake would battle for a friend just as readily as for any personal reason. He was usually in the thick of the political fracases of the years when it was the accepted thing to fight at the drop of a hat. But he also had lots of native wit which kept things interesting when he was a frequenter of the prosecutors' office during the Scovel and Wolverton regime's. In late years, with the approach of age, he had tempered his propensity to get into an argument and liked nothing more than to tell of “the good old days" when he helped the elder Baird in his organization battles.

He made his last political stand for leadership of the Twelfth Ward in 1926 when he supported the candidacy of Sergeant Ray Smith against Commissioner Clay W. Reesman for ward committeeman. Schiller was supporting Congressman Charles A. Wolverton and the late Senator Joseph H. Forsyth in a campaign against former Congressman Francis F. Patterson and State Senator Albert S. Woodruff.

Reesman won and among the first to visit the hospital after learning of the shooting was the city commissioner. Reesman was his latest chief as lights inspector as he was attached to the highway department. Commissioner Frank B. Hanna also visited the hospital.

"In all the years I have known him he has always been an enthusiastic and loyal friend with a good heart for everybody in trouble," Congressman Wolverton said when he learned of Schiller's death.

Schiller was also a familiar figure at the Elks Club, where he was an ardent card player. But after the death of his wife he gave up this pastime, contenting himself with watching the games. He was also a frequent visitor among old friends at the courthouse.


Camden Courier-Post
Evening Courier - September 14, 1934

STORE BANDITS TO BE QUIZZED IN CHESTER ON FEITZ MURDER
Material Witness Will View Suspects Caught by Camden Sleuths
BRICKNER QUESTIONED BY COLSEY ON HOLDUP
Police Order All Persons Arrested to Face 'Line Up' in Slaying Probe

Seven men and women held by Camden as police as material witnesses in the murder of Detective William T. Feitz two weeks ago in an alleged South Camden disorderly house will look over two men arrested in Chester PA after a store holdup here.

This was announced today by County Detective Lawrence T. Doran, who is directing the investigation for Prosecutor Samuel P. Orlando.

 At the same time, Chief Doran disclosed that after a conference with Police Chief Arthur Colsey, orders were issued that every person arrested in Camden, whether the charge is trivial or serious, will be placed in a police "lineup" and the material witnesses will face them to see if any of Feitz's killers are among them.

Chief Doran was not sure whether the Camden County authorities would be able to bring the two robbery suspects to Camden because they are also wanted in Pennsylvania for almost a score of other holdups and burglaries.

Will Visit Chester

In the event that Chester authorities will not turn the two men over to Camden detectives, the witnesses will go to Chester to examine them, Chief Doran said.

Those held in Chester in connection with the holdup Wednesday night of the candy store of Michael Guzik at 1301 Sheridan Street identified themselves as Peter Muraska, 10, of 342 McDowell Street, and Ray Tuttle, 30, of 2529 West Ninth Street, both of Chester.

While neither Chief Doran nor Chief Colsey believe Muraska or Tuttle may be implicated in the murder of the detective because they are not known to be killers, both declared the suspects will be questioned as to their whereabouts at the time Feitz was shot to death.

"We are letting nothing slip through our fingers at this stage of the investigation" Chief Doran said. "There is a bare possibility that either of these two suspects may be implicated or have some knowledge that would be useful to us in solving this crime".

While negotiations were under way between Camden County authorities and Chester police to bring the suspects here, Chief Colsey was making inquiry into the actions of Patrolman William Brickner during the holdup.

Questioned by Colsey

Brickner was summoned to Chief Colsey's office at City Hall today to explain why he had rushed from his home at 1263 Chase Street to the scene of the holdup when told by neighbors that it was taking place and then gave his gun to his son Elmer so he could watch the place so he the policeman could telephone police headquarters for help.

According to Guzik, the proprietor of the store, the bandits were in his store 30 minutes. They locked the doors behind them and  gagged Guzik and guarded his wife, Blanche, and her sister, Mary Pitura, 18.

The bandits broke open a trunk from which they took $100 in pennies, $30 in scrip, and $4 in silver. Guzik said the pennies represented his profit in a penny vending machine over a period of time.

It was while Guzik was left alone that he shouted from one of his windows and neighbors called Brickner who was at home and off duty. His son Elmer, fired one shot at the fleeing car before the patrolman came back from telephoning for help.

Several numbers of the license plates on the bandits car were covered with tape but one of the youngsters in the neighborhood succeeded in pushing aside the tape and getting the complete number which was turned over to police. Yesterday Detective Lieutenant Ward, accompanied by Detective Sergeant Gus Koerner and Detective Joseph Carpani went to Chester and made the arrests.

The car, which carried Pennsylvania tags, was listed in the name of Archie Hendrickson of Morton Avenue, Chester, police said.


Camden Courier-Post - August 15, 1935

...continued...


Camden Courier-Post - March 18, 1936

WIRTZ ORDERED TO FACE INQUIRY BY MRS. KOBUS
Carr and Koerner Will Be Questioned In Holdup Case
CAUTION IS URGED BY JUSTICE LLOYD

Detective Stanley Wirtz, suspended by Police Chief Arthur Colsey yesterday pending investigation into charges that he supplied the guns and an automobile for a holdup, has been ordered to appear today before Commissioner Mary W. Kobus, director of public safety.

Wirtz, who has been in charge of the city accident bureau, will be asked to "give his side of the story," Commissioner Kobus said.

Later the public safety head will question City Detective Clifford Carr and Police Sergeant Gus Koerner in connection with the capture of an alleged, bandit last Friday night, in an attempted holdup of the Eavenson & Levering Company payroll clerk.

Doran Accuses Wirtz

County Detective Chief Lawrence T. Doran yesterday charged that Wirtz had supplied the guns and automobile to be used in the holdup and then posted Carr and Koerner inside the plant to capture the bandits.

Wirtz, Doran said, admitted the charges in a statement given in the office of Prosecutor Samuel P. Orlando.

No motive for the detective's action were revealed by Doran.

Following the questioning of Wirtz and Sergeant Koerner at the prosecutor's office, both men visited the office of Justice Frank T. Lloyd late yesterday.

Justice Lloyd said later he had conferred with Commissioner Kobus in regard to the case.

"I advised the commissioner," Justice Lloyd said, "to go cautiously with the investigation and gather the facts before taking any action. It is a common thing for officers to lay traps for men who are prone to commit crime, although they have no business to encourage crime. I think it is bad policy to suspend any policeman before the facts of the case have been heard."

The charges against Wirtz came after an investigation was ordered into a statement made by Walter Lewandowski, 24 of 924 Atlantic Avenue, who was captured when he attempted to hold up a clerk at the wool scouring company, Ferry Avenue and Jackson Street. Lewandoski claimed he had “been framed" and named Joseph Powell, a police stoo1 pigeon, as the one who planned the holdup and then informed Wirtz of the plans.

Powell has been a police informer for some time, according to Chief Colsey. The latter said he had taken Powell into custody for questioning and had released him in his own recognizance. Chief Colsey admitted Powell had given police the tip resulting in Lewandowski’s arrest.

When Lewandowski was nabbed, his gun was loaded with blank cartridges. This gun, according to Chief Doran, was given by Wirtz to Powell, who in turn gave it to Lewandowski. Another youth, Leonard Rogalski, 20, of 1219 South Tenth Street, was supposed to take part in the ho1dup, but "got cold feet and ran away” police were told by Lewandoski.

Doran’s statement follows:

"Stanley Wirtz, Camden city detective, supplied the gun and the automobile used in the attempted hold­up of the Eavenson & Levering Company payroll office Friday night. Statements were given us by three suspects all tally.

“Walter Lewandoski worked at the Eavenson & Levering plant, but was laid off there February 28. On March 3 he had money coming to him and he returned to the plant. Joseph Powell accompanied him. Powell talked to Lewandoski then of the payroll, and suggested the holdup. Powell then got in touch with Stanley Wirtz, and told him that Lewandoski was going to stick up the payroll March 4.

"Wirtz on that night loaned Powell a car but someone got cold feet, and the holdup was not attempted. The following week, on March 13, last Friday, Wirtz took a car to Powell’s home and there turned over to him two guns and the automobile. Wirtz then had detectives posted at the scene to arrest the bandits when they made the holdup attempt.

" Powell met Lewandowski and Rogalski and drove them to the plant. There Powell turned over to his two companions the two guns that had been given him by, Wirtz. Rogalski got cold feet and refused to go through with the holdup. Powell then went into the plant with Lewandowski. After Lewandowski went in the door, Powell ran from the building.

“Sergeant Gus Koerner and Detective Clifford Carr, hiding in the office arrested Lewandowski. Powell knew where these officers were hiding.

"Wirtz was outside the building. He did not catch Powell."

Chief Doran said that no one implicates Koerner or Carr in any way in the statements received.

Koerner said:

"I was doing police work. I was brought into this case on a tip that a holdup was going to be staged and I had no knowledge of the guns or the car. I didn't know what it was all about but merely was there to perform my duties as a policeman.

Wirtz is 37 and lives at 1197 Thurman Street. He was one of the first of the new policemen to be appointed to the department in 1924 after Civil Service was put into effect following the adoption of Commission government in 1924. He is a veteran of the World War and got a special rating for that reason when he took the Civil Service examination. In 1931 Wirtz was appointed as an accident investigator in the detective bureau and has served in that capacity ever since. He has a good reputation as a policeman and has never been in trouble before.

About four years ago Wirtz figured in an automobile accident that caused serious injury to one of his legs.

Rogalski was not arrested until County Detectives James Wren and Casimir Wojtkowiak took him in Monday night. The same detectives arrested Powell. Both suspects were charged with attempted holdup and robbery and committed to the county jail.

Lewandowski also is in county jail, committed without bail by police Judge Lewis Liberman Saturday.


Camden Courier-Post * March 19, 1936

WIRTZ TO HEAR FATE IN BANDIT QUIZ TODAY
Colsey Doubts Cop Will Face Charges; Case to Go to Grand Jury

Decision on any action to be taken against Stanley Wirtz, suspended Camden detective charged with having furnished the guns and automobile for a holdup, will be made today by Commissioner Mary W. Kobus and Police Chief Arthur Colsey.

Wirtz, with Sergeant Gus Koerner and Detective Clifford Carr, was questioned yesterday, and decision was reserved.

Prosecutor Samuel P. Orlando, however, said he would place the case before the grand jury.

The charge involved the attempted holdup of the Eavenson & Levering Company payroll, in which one of the alleged bandits was captured at the scene last Friday night.

"No charges have been preferred against Wirtz,” Mrs. Kobus announced after the investigation.

"And I don't believe any charges will be made," Colsey commented, adding:

"Commissioner Kobus and I are going over the reports and statements of all concerned at 10:00 AM tomorrow and a decision will be made then.”

Suspended Tuesday

Wirtz was suspended Tuesday after County Detective Chief Lawrence T. Doran announced Wirtz had admitted supplying the pistols and car, allegedly used in the abortive attempt to obtain a $800 payroll at the wool-scouring plant. 

Wirtz was still under suspension last night, Colsey announced. 

William B. Macdonald, court stenographer, recorded the statements made by each man,

Koerner and Carr were "planted" in the office of the company before the holdup and frustrated the attempted crime, capturing Walter Lewandowski, 24, of 924 Atlantic Avenue.

"All three made full statements to us;" Colsey said and then declined to reveal what the statements contained.

Denies Stories Clash

Asked if there was any conflict between the statements made to Doran and those made to Mrs. Kobus and him, Colsey said:

''No, I wouldn't say so."

Wirtz appeared briefly before the commissioner and chief at the start of their probe, which was conducted in Mrs. Kobus' office. He left the room after about two minutes and told reporters, sitting outside:

"I refused to make a statement. I  made one yesterday and that is enough."

Mrs. Kobus, however, said Wirtz did not refuse to make a statement but, instead, asked for a little time to consider his statement.

"He said he had been In court all day and was nervous,” Mrs. Kobus said.

No Charges Made

Asked for a statement at the conclusion of the investigation, Mrs. Kobus said:

"No charges have been preferred against Wirtz. This was not a hearing on any charge. This was an investigation of reports which I read in the newspapers. It is the duty of the police officials to investigate any such report, and Wirtz and the other two detectives who figured in the case were called in to make statements. 'This was not, a trial and I do not care to make a statement now about what went on."

The suspension of Wirtz came after an investigation was ordered into a statement made by Lewandowski.

Lewandowski charged that he had been "framed" by Joseph Powell, a police stool pigeon. He named Powell as the one who "planned the holdup and, said Powell then informed Wirtz of the plans.

Rearrest Made

Doran said Wirtz, admitted dealing with Powell and giving Powell two pistols and an automobile for use in the holdup. As a result Powell, who had been arrested and released by city police, was rearrested by the county detectives.

In addition, Leonard “Rags” Rogalski, 20, of 1219 South 10th Street, was arrested by the county detectives. They said Lewandowski told them Rogalski originally was intended to take part in the holdup but got "cold feet", and backed out at the last moment.

Powell, Lewandowski and Rogalski are held in the county jail.

When informed last night of the statements made by Mrs. Kobus and Colsey, Prosecutor Orlando said:

"I have nothing to do with the discipline of the police department. I will present the full facts of this holdup to the grand jury and, that body may take any action it desires."

Jury to Get Case

Asked if he would request an indictment against Wirtz, Orlando said:

"I will give the grand jury the full facts. The members will decide for themselves what action to follow."

Doran was in conference briefly with Mrs. Kobus and Colsey before the three detectives were questioned. He said he gave them statements made by Lewandowski, Powell and Rogalski, and also by Wirtz.

Later Doran returned to Mrs. Kobus' office with a copy of charge of carrying concealed deadly weap­ons, preferred in 1930 against Lewandowski in 1930, when Lewandowski was 18.

This charge was no-billed, Doran said.

"He was listed as a mental case," Doran said, "and was examined by the county physician and pronounced O.K." .


Camden Courier-Post - August 8, 1936
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Camden Courier-Post * February 8, 1938

Victim of 'Plot' Falls Dead at Gloucester Inn
Police Probe Report of Mysterious Summons for Junk Yard Worker

Returning to Gloucester after he was summoned three hours earlier by a mysterious telephone call from Philadelphia, Alexander Obryeki, 57, of 825 Jersey avenue, alighted from a bus last night, walked to a cafe and fell dead.

Informed that Obryeki was poisoned last year and recently expressed fear that someone was attempting his life by poison, county authorities and Gloucester police started an investigation which might reach to Poland where Obryeki owned a farm, now tenanted by a nephew.

Coroner Dr. Ernest Larossa, ordered an autopsy to determine the cause of death.

Obryeki alighted from the bus, according to Gloucester police, and entered the cafe of William De Freitas at 309 South Broadway. He told the bartender he was "not feeling well" and collapsed before he could order anything.

Employer Makes Report

De Freitas telephoned police and Obryeki was taken to West Jersey Hospital in the American Legion ambulance by Patrolman Edward Kraft. Obryeki was pronounced dead on arrival.

Police assumed Obryeki died of a heart attack until his employer, Frank Pizzutillo, a junk dealer, with whom the man had lived for the past three months, told Chief of Police James Smith that Obryeki had been poisoned in 1937 and feared for his life, mentioning the ownership of his Poland farm in this connection.

Gloucester police summoned Lawrence T. Doran, chief of county detectives.

Feared Poison Death

"Obryecki used to be in the junk business for himself in Philadelphia and also worked for me several years ago," Pizzutillo tola police. "He came back to me three months ago and complained to me then that last year in the Summer he had gotten some poison in a drink, and he was afraid some one was trying to poison him. He said he thought some one might want to get his farm In Poland, which a nephew was taking care of for him.

'This afternoon about 5 o'clock he got a telephone message and he told me it was some one who wanted to see him in Philadelphia. I don't know who the call came from or whether he knew or not, but he seemed to think ft was very necessary for him to go there."

Pizzutillo said Obryecki has no relatives in this country.


Camden Courier-Post * February 12, 1938

Four Charged With Numbers Using 'Bingo'
Marino, Girard Held At Merchantville In New Racket

A new numbers racket based on "Bingo" was disclosed yesterday when county detectives and Merchantville police arrested four men, two of them police characters.

The suspects were seized in an automobile parked within sight of the Merchantville police station.

The two with police records are Joseph Marino and Harry Girard. The others are Irving Chapman, 23, of 43 South Merchant street, and John Holmes, 23, of 227 Main street, both of Merchantville. All were arraigned on a charge of violating the state lottery law, before Justice of the Peace Samuel Rudolph, who complied with a request from Prosecutor Samuel P. Orlando and held them without bail for the grand jury. 

Marino's police record dates to 1914. He received three suspended sentences, three other cases were nolle pressed by the court and on one occasion he served a jail sentence.

His last time in custody was as a suspect in the slaying of Abe Goodman, former numbers baron. He was released after questioning.

Girard's criminal record dates back to 1924. He has been arrested five times, serving two reformatory sentences and one term in the state prison.

Details of the new racket were not immediately divulged by the prosecutor's office. It was learned, however, that hundreds of "bing slips'" were seized by the police when the men were arrested.

The new game is operated by means of a printed slip which contains the word "Bingo" in large type at the top. There is a set of instructions for the player, part of which reads:

"More action for your money than any other game on the market, plays six days for 30 cents. Beginning Monday, write the daily policy number for that day in the three squares on the same line with the word Monday, continue in this manner for each day of the week from Monday until Saturday, making sure that you write that number issued for that particular day during the week. Your ticket is dated and write only on the line reserved for that day of the week. Whenever your ticket number appears in a straight line (in any direction) from using the daily numbers in this way you receive the amount printed beside arrow which points in the direction your ticket runs."

Space for Writing

Then follows a space for the writing of the daily number, with the amount of payoff, from $2 to $10, according to which manner your number reads if you "hit."

Police Chief William Linderman, County Detective Chief Lawrence T. Doran and County Detectives Wilfred Dube, James J. Mulligan, Joseph Bennie and Casmir Wojtkowiak arrested the four men, all of whom were taken at once to the office of Prosecutor Orlando for questioning.

It was revealed at the prosecutor's office that an attempt to flood Camden city and county with the new numbers game has been made during the last two weeks.

Detectives have been trailing an automobile during this time, believed to have been the car in which the men were seized yesterday.


Camden Courier-Post * February 14, 1938

11 NABBED BY POLICE IN GAMBLING RAIDS
7 Arrested in Bingo Numbers Racket; 4 Seized in Betting Place

Ten men and a woman were arrested in gambling raids over the weekend by Camden city and county authorities.

Seven were arrested for operating a "bingo numbers" racket. A warrant also was issued for Frank Palese, 400 Spruce street, a member of a widely known South Camden family, as the "big shot" of the racket, according to Chief Lawrence T. Doran, of county detectives. Doran said last night Palese is still a fugitive.

In another raid by Camden police, three men and a woman were arrested in an alleged horse racing betting establishment at 1149 Lansdowne avenue. The place was on the second floor over a grocery store, according to Sergeant Gus Koerner, City Detective Thomas Murphy, Jr.
and Patrolman James McLaughlin, who made the raid. Koerner and Murphy also figured in the second raid.

Several racing forms and four telephones with two direct wires to tracks now in operation were seized, according to Koerner and Murphy, The police first arrested Roland Flynn, 36, of 589 Carman street; Neil Zeldman, 43, of 1064 Langham avenue, and James O'Donal, 27, of. 
1119 Empire avenue, and held them in $1000 bail for violating the State crimes act.

Woman Arrested

Later Mrs. Rose Koplin, 37, who lives in an apartment over the store, was taken into custody on the same charge and held in $500 bail. Mrs. Koplin's brother, Milton Katz, posted cash bail for her release.

Katarina Pologruto, 420 West street, posted bail for O'Donal, who also is known as O'Donnell, and Flynn. Frank Davalos, saloonkeeper, of 441 Benson street, furnished bail for Zeldman.

Murphy reported that $700 had been bet on race horses at the establishment up until 3.30 p. m., Saturday, the time of the raid.

Among those arrested in the "bingo numbers" racket was Fred Rossi, who fought in the prize ring under the name of "Pee Wee" Ross. He was arrested Saturday afternoon at his home at 438 Mickle street by Koerner and Murphy.

O'Donal, Flynn, Zeidman and Mrs. Koplin will be given hearings today in police court.
Others under arrest in the lottery game their names and addresses as Joseph Marino, 288 Chestnut street; Harry Girard, 446 Pine street; Peter Branco, 1109 South Third street; Donald Goodman, of Woodlynne; Irving Chapman, 43 South Merchant street, Merchantville, and John 
Holmes, 227 Main street, Merchantville. An eighth man, James Lodge, Brooklawn, was questioned and released as a material witness.

Rossi, Branco, Goodman and Holmes were released in $500 bail each for the Grand Jury by Justice of the Peace Samuel Rudolph. Prosecutor Orlando said he would demand bail of $1000 each for release of Girard and Marino.

Refused to Sell

Lodge told the detectives he was approached to sell the slips but that he refused to take them.

Doran stated that Marino insists he is the operator of the lottery, but the county detective chief declared that Marino was merely trying to "take the rap" for Palese.

City and county authorities have been aware of the existence of the new racket for about 10 days. Murphy and Koerner had been detailed specifically by Commissioner Mary W. Kobus to investigate and break up the ring. The two sleuths followed numerous suspects, watching 
where they went, and getting a list of stops and suspects.

The trap was sprung when Marino, Girard, Chapman and Holmes were arrested on South Centre street in Merchantville as they sat in a parked car. The car, according to Doran, bore license plates issued to Palese.

Merchantville police and Doran arrested the four and seized bingo numbers slips. Murphy and Koerner also arrested Branco, while County Detectives James Mulligan, Elmer Mathis, Wilfred Dube and Casmir Wojtkowiak arrested Goodman.

Doran admitted that the automobile in which the four men were found was the property of Palese. A search was made at the home of Palese, on Fourth street, near Spruce, but nothing indicating he was connected with the racket was found, Doran said. But Doran added he has information which leads him to believe Palese was the head of the new racket..


Camden Courier-Post * February 17, 1938

PAIR ON TRIAL CLAIM THEY WERE 'DUPES' IN CHECK FRAUD
State Closes Case Against 2 Men Charged With Pay Swindle Plot
COPS READ STATEMENT

Two men who declare they were the unwitting dupes of a third, who is still at large, went on trial yesterday in Criminal Court before Judge Clifford A. Baldwin. The defendants are charged with conspiracy to defraud tradesmen and others through the use of counterfeit paychecks 
of the R. C. A. Manufacturing Company.

The defendants are Alfred J. Bittner, 25, of 892 Lois avenue and Benjamin Joie, 25, of Williamstown. The third man, accused by the others as the, "brains" of the alleged plot, is George Hickman, now a fugitive.

The State closed its case late yesterday when Detective Thomas Murphy read a statement made to him by Bittner at the time of his arrest. James Mulligan and Heber McCord, two other detectives, said they were present when Bittner made the statement.

According to the document Murphy read to the jury, Bittner said Hickman came to him and asked him to do a printing job. When Bittner heard it was a check job, he refused to take it, saying he did not want to get into trouble.

Refused Printing Job

Hickman went away, returning several days later with material which he asked Bittner to look over. Bittner said he told Hickman the material could be used in a check printing job. Again Hickman asked Bittner to do the work, Bittner said, and again he refused. 

According to the statement, Bittner's reply each time was: "Not interested." ' Hickman again appealed to him to do the job, asserting "no one will catch up with you, if you do it." Finally Bittner said he would tell Hickman about the printing business.

Hickman promised Bittner money for the information, and then came to Bittner's home and started using his press. Bittner noticed Hickman was printing RCA checks and asked him where he obtained the trademark. 

The reply, Bittner said, was: "In Philadelphia."

Bittner told Murphy he watched Hickman print the checks until about 100 were printed. Several days later, Bittner said, he heard Joie was arrested, and a couple of days later he, himself, was arrested.

Murphy testified under cross-examination a search of Bittner's home resulted in discovery of four pieces of blank paper "that looked similar to the paper used in the forged checks."

Murphy also testified Joie said he had been paid $25 by Hickman for the use of his car one day, but that he knew nothing about Hickman's business or any conspiracy to use the paychecks to swindle victims.

Photograph Identified 

James Bennett, Oaklyn grocery clerk, was the first witness. He identified a photograph of Hickman as the man who came in and cashed one of the counterfeit checks. Bennett said he saw no one else in the car. He said he wrote down the license number of the car on the sleeve of his white coat.

Others who identified the photograph of Hickman as the passer of similar checks were:
Charles Brodson, 1220 Empire avenue, owner of the Central Liquor Company; Albert Drell, employee of a meat store at 1192 Yorkship Square; David Raphael, chain grocery employee at Haddon and Kaighn avenues; Jules Rosenberg, grocer, of 618 West Maple avenue, 
Merchantville, and Samuel Kaplan, of a chain store at 1068 Kaighn avenue. Cecelia Rosenberg, wife of the proprietor of a liquor store at 2320 Federal street, was the only victim who could not positively identify Hickman's picture.

Edwin Bigger, assistant paymaster of the RCA Manufacturing Company, testified the checks were not those issued by his company. Lawrence M. Crowther, an executive of a Philadelphia firm that prints the RCA checks, also testified they were counterfeit.

The trial is expected to continue for several days.

Engraver Testifies

John S. Quirk, 218 North Tenth street, Philadelphia, a designer and engraver, said he had done some work for Bittner. He told how County Detective James Mulligan came to his office when he showed the detective a copy of an RCA trademark cut on which he had worked for a 
man he said may have been Bittner. Under cross-examination Quirk said the copy shown him in court and the copy also presented for examination, bore no relation.

Edward H. Fritsch, office manager for Ruttle, Shaw and Wetherill, typesetters, said Hickman came to his establishment for type set on three occasions. Joie, he said, picked up one order. He identified some of the type shown him in court as set by his firm. He also identified a style book shown him as coming from his company's, offices.

E. Irving Silverstein, 5503 Pine street, a photo engraver for the Atlas Photo Engraving Company, identified a border on the checks which he said he made up for Hickman.

Chief of County Detectives Lawrence T. Doran told of the investigation. He said he had gone to Bittner's printing establishment, where he found the stylebook shown in evidence, as well as four blank sheets of paper similar to that used for the bogus checks..

Camden Courier-Post - December 26, 1939
...continued...
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Andrew Scarduzio
Lawrence T. Doran
Thomas Murphy

Joseph Romanowski

Joseph Lenkowski
Stanley Jaskiewicz
Nicholas Scarduzio

Mary W. Kobus
Everett Joslin
Harry Kyler
West Jersey Hospital

Bridge Cafe

Mount Vernon Street
Orchard Street
South 8th Street
Dominic "Mickey" Hanley


Camden Courier-Post - January 8, 1940
FRED KLOSTERMAN HIT
BY PUMP GUN FIRE
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Club Cadix

March 16, 2003

Click on Image to Enlarge

Below: 1050 & 1048 Mechanic Street. Fred  Klosterman owned the bar lived at 1048 Mechanic Street when he was shot on January 6, 1940.


Camden Courier-Post - Morning Post
January 9, 1940
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Camden Courier-Post - Evening Courier
January 9, 1940
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Camden Courier-Post - January 10, 1940

GUNMEN IN PHILADELPHIA
MURDER COLOZZI IN NUMBERS WAR
Westmont Victim Reported to Have Been Aide of Klosterman
SCARDUZIO DEATH TIEUP ALSO SEEN

A reputed employee of Fred Klosterman, Camden numbers baron, was shot and killed in Philadelphia last night in what police there believed was an inter-city fight for control of the numbers racket.

The dead man was Joseph Joseph Colozzi, 49, of Westmont, known in the underworld and police circles as a “cheap thief”.

While Captain John Murphy, of the Philadelphia vice squad, expressed belief the slaying of Colozzi and shooting last Sunday of Klosterman were related.  County Detective Chief Lawrence T. Doran was working on another angle.


Visited
Colozzi’s Home

Doran said Colozzi had been closely associated during the last 10 days with John Lenkowski, 22, a fugitive wanted here in connection with the murder of Andrew Scarduzio.

“Both of them were convicted of similar offences- thievery, and they apparently were hooked up together lately. I could not say whether either of them ever was In the numbers racket."

Philadelphia police, however, seemed certain Colozzi was shot as a result of a new “numbers war”. They said they had Information that the dead man apparently was in the employ of a Camden numbers bank.

Credence was given the report that local numbers barons are attempting to “muscle in” on the “Philadelphia play” when Irving Bickel, 34, who admits being friendly with Klosterman was arrested yesterday.

New Setup Alleged

Bickel, Murphy said, declared he had been contacting numbers writers in Philadelphia to inform them of a “new setup” and invite them to join.

Detective Sergeant Benjamin Simon and Detective Edwin Mills questioned Bickel in Philadelphia yesterday and said he admitted “knowing Klosterman” but denied he worked for him.

Simon and Mills were in Philadelphia again today working on the Colozzi shooting to ascertain whether there was any connection between the slaying and shooting of Klosterman on Sunday. Simon said he would investigate to learn if the slain man ever had been in the employ of Klosterman.

A theory advanced yesterday by police that Klosterman had been shot by killers hired by Atlantic City gamblers brought on an expression of surprise from shore police.

Detective Captain Frank Feretti said he did not know of any gambling house near the Union Station in which Klosterman may have been interested. He said no request had “been made by Camden police for an inquiry at the resort.”

Colozzi was murdered at Eleventh and Carpenter Streets, South Philadelphia, last night. The top of his head was blasted by shotgun slugs to end1a career in crime that extended over 30 year, with at least 30 arrests.

Colozzi's body was found lying across the trolley tracks in a darkened section near the Bartlett Junior High School.

Police of the Seventh and Carpenter streets station a few minutes before received an anonymous telephone call that "there's been a shooting at Eleventh and Catherine.” The caller hung up.

No One Sees Shooting

Homicide squad detectives under Acting Captain William C. Bugle rounded up a number of persons in the neighborhood but could locate no one who admitted he saw the shooting. That was what the police expected, for the section has been the scene of unsolved gang killings in the past.

Captain Engle admitted the possibility that Colozzi, may have been allied in some way with Jersey gamblers attempting to poach on Philadelphia territory,  and had met sudden death for that reason.

Though Captain Engle described the murdered man as a “cheap thief" he wouldn't deny the possible link to the threatened outbreak in a numbers war between rival operators as evidenced by the Klosterman shooting.

“I won't say there’s a tie up, and I won't say there's not” said Engle. “We can't tell, right now”.

Syndicate Under Way’

But the story told Captain Murphy, head of Philadelphia's vice squad, by a Camden man known to be a pal of Klosterman, put further credence in the rumored attempts at revision along the numbers front

The man is Bickel of a hotel at Delaware Avenue and Market street, who yesterday was held in $1000 bail for a hearing next Tuesday by Magistrate Thomas Connor in Philadelphia’s central police court on suspicion of being connected with the numbers racket. He was picked up in Germantown.

Captain Murphy said Bickel admitted to him he was contacting various numbers writers for the purpose of having them pool their resources.

"He admitted verbally he had the names of several Philadelphia writers and that he was trying to line up the boys,” Murphy said. “He is trying to coerce them with a new numbers set-up. That will cause a revival of gang warfare”.

Although the murdered man was never known to have had theatrical connections police said he often boasted he was an entertainer in a New York cabaret. 

Brother of Philadelphia Cop

The body of Colozzi, brother of a Philadelphia policeman, was identified by the officers wife at the Pennsylvania Hospital, Eighth and Spruce Streets. Five bullets had penetrated his skull.

Police said Colozzi lived at 113 Westmont Avenue, Westmont, since his last release from prison, some time during September 1939.

He lived with his wife Rose and most of their eight children.

In Colozzi’s pocket, when a police ambulance arrived at the scene, was a card bearing his name and the Westmont address.

He was one of two brothers of John Colozzi, whose police record was said to be longer even than Joe’s, and is being sought.

Police of Haddon Township said Colozzi was known to them only as an "innocent” junk dealer, who plied his trade picking up old car parts in and around the section/

Colozzi's last brush with the law according to the Philadelphia police records, was last Spring when he was implicated in a dress robbery. He was freed in September after serving part of his sentence.

Meanwhile Camden city and county detectives continued their investigations into the pump gun shooting of Klosterman, who remained in critical condition at West Jersey Hospital.

Klosterman was shot down in front of his saloon at Mount Ephraim Avenue and Mechanic Street at 10:00 PM Sunday as he went to the street to drive his car to a garage. The would-be killer sped away. 

Seldom In Jail Long

Colozzi had run afoul of the law since early school days, but he often boasted that “with all the friends I got, I can't stay in jail long." He invariably managed to regain freedom, only to renew his jostles with police.

The stiffest sentence he ever got was on December 13, 1934 when Judge Frank F. Neutze sent him and an accomplice to state prison for robbing a coat factory at 7 South 3rd Street four months before.

          In passing sentence on the much arrested “Manayunk Joe”, Judge Neutze put aside pleas the prisoner was the father of eight children and sent him “up the river” for a term ox six to seven years.

          "You're a typical criminal and a menace to the public" Judge Neutze said in a searing rebuke. "A light sentence won't do you any good. Your record is one of the longest shown to me since l have been on the bench. You represent a type that is better off behind bars, for outside of prison you are a menace to the public. I’ll go the limit with you” 

Obtained Police Badge

But Colozzi merely nodded, apparently thinking of which “friend” he would call on this time to get him out.

Previously Joe had established a second-hand tire shop on the White Horse Pike at Lindenwold and escaped serious penalty as police held a continuous club over his head for suspected escapades.

On one occasion he diverted his talents to another “profession”- extortion. By some means he obtained a police badge in Clementon township. A few months later he and several other members of the police department were rounded up for wholesale extortion of money from motorists and truck drivers

Those were the day of Prohibition, and the White Horse Pike was a frequently used. Highway for passage of beer trucks between Philadelphia and Camden and Atlantic City and other sea shore points.

The extortion continued among other motorists most of them guilty of petty violations. There were times when Colozzi took “anything they had”, police said. 

35-Year Police Record

Colozzi’s police record dates back to1904, when as a a child of 12 he was committed to the Glen Mills, Pa. Home for Boys for petty larceny.  He served 19 months.

In 1909 he was given a two-month sentence In the Montgomery county .jail at Norristown PA, after another conviction for larcerny.

Then: followed a series of brushes with the law, with Colozzi landing behind bars a dozen times, but invariably obtaining freedom before the expiration of his term.

The record continues: 1914, committed to Philadelphia County Prison, larceny, three months;

In 1915, for receiving stolen goods, Eastern Penitentiary, four years and six months;

In 1919, at Newark, larceny, sentenced to two to seven months and pardoned in December, 1920.

A 10-year stretch followed during which his name failed to appear on police records. 

Acquitted of Charge

 In 1929, State Police of the Hammonton barracks arrested him for extortion, but he was acquitted in Camden County Criminal Court May 90, 1930.

In 1930 he was arrested in Trenton for breaking and entering and sentenced to a year and six months in Mercer County jail.

In 1933 he was taken in custody by the U.S. Marshal at Trenton. No disposition of the case is listed.

Later in 1933. he was arrested for Larceny in Philadelphia, and no record is known further of the case.

Later the same year Camden police arrested him for attempted larceny. No disposition.

In October 1933, he was jailed  by U. S. Marshals for violation of the Dyer Act, interstate transportation of a stolen auto, but was placed on five years’ probation.

In July. 1934 he was arrested in Camden for breaking and entering and in December of the same year was sentenced to six to seven years in State Prison.

The last time he appeared in local police records was less than a year ago, when he was arrested on a detainer for violation of federal parole and sent to Mercer County jail. A few days later he was freed.


Camden Evening Courier - March 27, 1945
Stephen Burns
Lawrence Doran
Walter Keown
Gene Mariano
William B. McDonald
Bart Sheehan
Casablanca Hold-up 
Rustic Tavern
Fred DeMarco
Anthony Schiavo
Mrs. Margaret Ensay
Gertrude Bailey
Sarah Currie
Sylvia M. Goodwill
Elizabeth Heinemann
Helen Lynch
Hanna Mollihan
Mary Peacock
Alberta Platt - Elsie Stokes
Mary Thumm
Mrs. Anna Stehr

Kaighn Avenue

Chestnut Street
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Camden Evening Courier
March 27, 1945

 

 


Camden Courier-Post - April 14, 1950
Retirement Dinner

April 1950

Seated: Larry Doran

Standing, Left to Right:

County Prosecutor Mitchell Cohen
Judge Bartholomew A Sheehan
Judge Frank T. Lloyd Jr.
First Assistant Prosecutor William T. Cahill
NJ Supreme Court Justice Albert E. Burling

Click on Image to Enlarge


Camden Courier-Post - April 14, 1950

 

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