John
J.
Crean


JOHN J. CREAN

Camden Courier-Post - August 29, 1935

.... continued...

.... continued...

Albert S. Woodruff - Elizabeth C. Verga - Emma Hyland - Harry L. Maloney - Hotel Walt Whitman
Firmin Michel - Carl Kisselman - Mitchell H. Cohen - Edward V. Martino - John J. Crean 
Clay W. Reesman - William D. Sayrs - Pauline Caperoon - Abe Fuhrman - Harold W. Bennett 
Mary Kobus - George E. Brunner - Frank J. Hartmann Jr. - Frank T. Lloyd - Frederick von Nieda

CAMDEN COURIER-POST - JANUARY 18, 1938

WCAM

Firmin Michel

Rud Priesendanz Jr.

John J. Crean

Clarence Moulette

George E. Brunner

Frank J. Hartmann Jr.

Frederick von Nieda

Harold W. Bennett

Federal Street


Camden Courier-Post - February 5, 1938

2 New Faces Will Appear On Camden Election Board
Reappointment of Clark and King Unlikely After Expiration of Terms March; Republican Leaders Scan Possibilities

By MERCURY

There will be two new faces on the Camden County Board of Elections after March 1.

The terms of Charles J. Clark, Democrat, and William A. E. King, Republican, expire and Mercury has learned that neither will be reappointed.

The names of the appointees must be in the hands of the Governor by the first of the month, for confirmation, by the Senate. The names are submitted to Governor Moore by the respective State Committee, chairmen who in turn usually accepts them from the State Committee members and county chairmen,

State Republican Chairman Clayton Freeman will send the Republican nomination to the Governor. Surrogate Frank B. Hanna, state committeeman, has a letter from Freeman asking for the name of the Republican member to be appointed. It is likely that Freeman will send to the governor whatever name is given him by the Camden County members.

Thumbs Down on King

Hanna, Mrs. Florence Baker, state committeewoman and herself a member of the county election board, and Dr. Leslie H. Ewing, county G.O.P. chairman, have been holding numerous conferences on the subject.

Dr. Ewing has definitely turned thumbs down on King, Mrs. Baker, too, has refused to recommend King and it was said that Hanna will not recommend him.

As a matter of fact, Mercury learns. Dr. Ewing has a list of prospective candidates. The origin of the list is unknown but it includes a number of city and county candidates. Among these are William Lehman, manager at the Republican headquarters; George Tarter and Meyer Sakin, attorneys; Charles S. Wright, of East Camden; Jack Weinberg; George Roberts, of Collingswood; Curtis Walter, Pennsauken tax collector, and Harry Willson, Pennsauken assessor.

Mrs. Baker for Sakin

Mrs. Baker is reported to be for Sakin.

It wasn't known who Hanna is for, but reports have it that he may recommend George Walton, of Haddonfield. If Hanna does recommend Walton, who is from out in the county, it would leave the way open for appointment of a city member in the event Mrs. Baker, who accepted the membership temporarily, resigns.

Who the Democratic appointee will be is conjectural but it won't be Clark, who has been at odds with the city-county Democratic organization.

A number of names have come in for consideration, among them being John Morrissey, chairman of the excise board; Bart Sheehan, former assemblyman; Robert Wren, Pennsauken committeeman; John Crean, of Haddonfield; John Trainor, of Haddon Township, and Sidney Kaplan..


Camden Courier-Post - February 7, 1938

9th Ward Democrats to Dine

Mary Ellen Soistmann

Oscar Moore

John J. Crean

DINNER WILL HONOR NINTH WARD LEADERS
Democrats to Fete Mrs. Soistmann, Moore, Crean in Hof Brau Tomorrow-

Three Ninth ward Democratic leaders, state Committeewoman Mary Ellen McVeigh Soistmann. Freholder Oscar Moore and County Committeeman John J. Crean- will be honored tomorrow night at a dinner in Weber's Hof Brau.

Buses will leave headquarters of the Ninth Ward Democratic Association, Sixth and Berkley Streets, at 7.15 p. m. and will return at 11.30 and 12 p. m.

Mrs. Soistmann, member of the county committee since 1934, has lived in the Ninth ward for 311 years. She became state committeewoman last year. She is a daughter of the late Patrick J. McVeigh, one of the old-time Democratic leaders.

Moore has lived in the Ninth ward for 32 years. He was elected freeholder last November when the ward was swung from the Republican column.

Crean, who has lived in the ward for 27 years, was president of the Ninth Ward Democratic Association for five years, retiring in September, 1937, to become county committeeman. He also is an assistant city solicitor.


Camden Courier-Post - February 8, 1938

TEST CASE PLANNED ON POLICE PENSIONS
City to Oppose Sergeant's Plea Against Paying Two Percent Assessments

A test suit to clarify the law governing a two-percent assessment against the pension salary of James R. Clay, retired Camden police sergeant, will be brought by the City of Camden through Firmin Michel, city counsel.

This was learned yesterday when counsel for Clay confirmed the report. Michel, after first ruling the money was illegally deducted for a period of several years, decided to oppose the writ of mandamus sought by Alex Schueneman, Jr., attorney for Clay.

John J. Crean, assistant city solicitor, stated the legal department deemed it advisable to settle the matter in the Supreme Court in an effort to clarify the law. Crean spoke in the absence of Michel, who was not available for a statement.

Under the act concerning pensions, four percent of salary is deducted and contributed to the police and firemen's pension fund. The two percent is in addition to the regular pension assessment. This amount is set aside for the pensions of widows of deceased pensioners.

Schueneman contends that inasmuch as Clay has no immediate survivor to receive a pension he should receive his pension salary without the additional two percent assessment.

"The point in question is debatable and the law is not entirely clear," said Crean." The city does not want to deprive any pensioner of his rightful amount. The law should be clarified by the court. The city legal department will oppose the writ of mandamus in the form of a test case.

Supreme Court Justice Frank T. Lloyd issued the rule to show cause why a mandamus should not issue. The case will be heard later in the month by Supreme Court Justice Ralph W. E. Donges.


Camden Courier-Post - February 9, 1938

BAIRD AIDES HELD SEEKING CITY RULE
Orlando Warns Democrats at Fete to Moore, Crean and Mrs. Soistmann?

by GORDON MACKAY

David Baird Jr., and his allies have already arranged their slate for the next city commission election and are laying plans to recapture the city government of Camden. Democrats should know of this movement and prepare to thwart the proposed plans at once.

This warning was given by County Prosecutor Samuel P. Orlando last night, at a testimonial dinner in the Hof Brau at which three Ninth Ward Democrats were feted, and at which 500 were present. The trio honored comprised Mrs. Mary Ellen Soistmann, state committee woman; Oscar Moore, freeholder, and John J. Crean, assistant city solicitor and county committeeman.

While the three guests were feted and presented with wrist watches and other tokens, the affair took on a love feast aspect for the three New Deal commissioners arid all shades and leanings of Democratic leadership.

Mayor George E. Brunner was toastmaster and took occasion to poke fun at the G.O.P. and its tribulations over the county headquarters.

Brunner Jests at G.O.P.

"I have just received word," said the Mayor with due solemnity, "that the Republican county committee of whom I, read today was having trouble over their headquarters, have finally solved their troubles tonight.”

"I understand they are giving up their present location and. have just been presented by the Bell Telephone Company with a booth, and are now looking for another tenant to whom the committee can sublet half the space."

Orlando's warning came after he congratulated the special guests, He said:

"I have every reason to believe that Dave Baird and the rest of the Republican chieftains are already laying their plans to capture the city commission. They are working to the end with their own slate, so that they can take from the people of Camden the good government which they have received far some time.

"We Democrats do not want to take this warning lightly, we want to remember that Baird and his chieftains are already working toward capturing the government of Camden, and this is something that .we want to prevent at all hazards."

Orlando also congratulated the gathering as an indication of the growth of the party, and the faith that the people of Camden come to have in the Democratic party and in its principles."

The prosecutor also prophesied greater honors in the future for the triumvirate who were the guests of the occasion.

Disclaims Harmony Rift

Mrs. Emma E. Hyland, postmaster and long a figure in Ninth Ward affairs declared she resented any newspaper stories that hinted that there was the slightest rift in the Democratic party.

She told of the trouble the Democrats in the Ninth Ward, which, she declared, had never elected a Democratic freeholder until Oscar Moore was chosen. Mrs. Hyland told of detectives shadowing her home during election, and of 'the struggles' that she and Moore had known together in fighting for the party in that bailiwick.

"I want to say" continued the postmaster, "that we must all be impressed by the spirit of harmony that this gathering means has come to pass.

"I don't want you, and I will not myself believe all you read in the newspapers declaring we are fighting among· ourselves, for if there is anything like that in progress, I don't know anything about it and I don't believe you do, either."

County Treasurer Edward J. Kelleher, hailed as "The Father of the Democratic Party in Camden County" contrasted the spectacle before him with the harmony dinner which he and others sponsored years ago.

“We sold 150 tickets," he said, "and gave away 150 more, and when the sponsors reached the hall at 7 p.m., the hour of the dinner, there wasn't a single other person on hand. Later the hall was filled, and it held 200 guests. 200 to attend a Democratic harmony dinner that embraced all of Camden county."

Officials Laud Guests

Mrs. Bertha Shippen Irving, postmaster of Haddonfield; Police Judge Gene R. Mariano and others also congratulated the guests. Mayor Brunner introduced Commissioner Frank J. Hartmann by calling attention to the cleanup campaign now under Hartmann auspices.

"Just as Hartmann is making Camden a cleaner city in which to live," said the Mayor, "so has Commissioner Kobus made the city clean from crime. The streets are clean, the city is clean, and this has only been made possible by the efforts of the three commissioners who have worked in harmony, and who are going to continue to work in harmony." Crean, Moore and Mrs. Soistmann spoke their thanks to those present for the banquet, the gifts and the sentiments expressed.


Camden Courier-Post - December 26, 1939

Seriously Hurt

Six Ribs Are Broken and Lung is Punctured
SWERVED AUTO TO AVOID DOG

Dr. Frank O. Stem - Father Richard T. Crean - Edward J. Quinlan

Click on Images to Enlarge


Camden Courier-Post
July 4, 1941

South 5th Street

Carman Street

North 27th Street

Garfield Avenue

Division Street

Mt. Ephraim Avenue

Sayrs Avenue

North 9th Street

Sycamore Street


Camden Courier-Post - August 26, 1941

Henry Magin Laid to Rest By War Veteran Buddies
TRUCKS OF FLOWERS IN FUNERAL CORTEGE

Funeral services for City Commissioner Henry Magin were held today with his colleagues in official and veterans circles participating.

Services were conducted in city commission chambers on the second floor of city hall, in charge of Rev. Dr. W.W. Ridgeway, rector of St. Wilfrid's Episcopal Church.

The casket was carried by war veteran associates of the public works director, who died from a heart attack Friday. A color guard from the Veterans of Foreign Wars and the American Legion preceded the casket, followed by the four remaining members of the city commission, Mayor George Brunner and commissioners E. George Aaron, Mrs. Mary W. Kobus and Dr. David S. Rhone.

A guard of honor lined both sides of' city hall steps, 22 policemen on one side and 22 firemen on the other, representing Magin's age, 44 years.

Hundreds of men and women waited outside the building to pay their respects as the solemn procession filed by. Mayor Brunner had declared this morning a holiday for city employees. The casket was borne by Thomas Jackson and Samuel Magill, both past Legion commanders; Leon McCarty, past commander of August Walter Chapter, Disabled American Veterans; Richard Jermyn, past commander of Post 1270, Veterans of Foreign Wars; Benjamin P. Thomas, past captain of Sparrow Ship No. 1269. V. F. W.; and William Miller, past State commander, D. A. V.  

Three trucks were required to carry the floral pieces from the scene of the services to the National Cemetery at Beverly, where burial took place.  

An estimated 8000 persons from all walks of life paid their respects to the late official by viewing the body as it lay in state in the commission chambers.

The throng of mourners of Camden city and county was the largest to converge on a public building since the funeral of Fire Chief Charles Worthington, who was killed while fighting a fire almost 20 years ago. His body was placed on public view in the rotunda of the old county courthouse.

File Past Bier  

A continuous progression of people filed past the flag draped bier for more than three and one-half hours. Scores of Republicans and hundreds of Democrats joined in the tribute.

Services were conducted by Camden lodges of Elks and Moose. Military rites were conducted by the Fairview Post, American Legion, of which Magin was a founder and past commander. The tribute was led by Mitchell Halin, post commander, and C. Richard Allen, past department commander. 

James W. Conner, chief clerk of the city water bureau and past State Commander of the V.F.W., conducted rites at the grave.  

Mayor Brunner and Commissioners Kobus, Aaron, and Rhone came early and remained throughout the hours of viewing. Mrs. Helen Magin, the widow, and daughter Helen, attired in deep mourning, arrived shortly after 7:00 PM.

Embraces Widow, Daughter  

Commissioner Kobus, who knelt in prayer before the bier, arose and went over to Mrs. Magin and her daughter. Mrs. Kobus embraced and kissed the widow and daughter of the late commissioner. They were in tears.  

Three firemen and three policemen maintained a vigil as a guard of honor. They were Patrolmen Jack Kaighn, George Weber, and William Deery and Firemen Arthur Batten, Warren Carter and William Reed.

American Legion and V. F. W. members in uniform alternated as members of the military guard of honor. A detail of 50 policemen was under command of Acting Lieutenant John Garrity. Fifty firemen, under supervision of Deputy Chief Walter Mertz, assisted the patrolmen in handling the crowd, which at times choked the stairways leading to the second floor.  

Freeholders Arrive  

Albert H. Molt, director of the Board of Freeholders and Freeholders John J. Tull, Oscar Moore, Ventorino Francesconi, Stanley Ciechanowski, Earl Armstrong and Emil J. McCall arrived shortly after 7:00 PM. Moore and Tull wore American Legion overseas caps. Albert S. Marvel, clerk of the board, accompanied the freeholders.

Employees of the various bureaus in the department of public works, headed by Commissioner Magin, came in delegations with the highway bureau having 150, the largest number.  

Frank A. Abbott, acting director of the department, accompanied by James P. Carr, superintendent of Streets; led the highway bureau employees. Abbott is deputy director of revenue and finance and first assistant to Mayor Brunner. He was named by Brunner as acting director until the City Commission elects Mr. Magin's successor.

County Clerk Frank J. Suttill, City Clerk Clay W. Reesman, Fire Chief John H. Lennox and James A. Howell, chief of the city electrical bureau, attended, as did Albert Austermuhl, secretary of the board of education. Every city department sent a floral piece.

Outstanding Floral Tribute

Outstanding among the floral tributes was a six-toot broken circle of varied flowers, an offering from Mayor Brunner and Commissioners Kobus, Aaron, and Rhone.

A floral chair was sent by the Camden Police and Firemen’s Association. The word “Rest” was made up of flowers. The offering of the Veterans League of South Jersey, an organization formed by Commissioner Magin and of which he was the first president, was a large floral pillow.

The freeholders and county officials gave a large floral basket. Floral tributes came from the employees of the board of education, the RCA Manufacturing Company, the police and fire bureaus, Pyne Point Athletic Association, the Elks, Moose and several Democratic clubs.  

The floral tributes came in such numbers yesterday afternoon that Funeral Director Harry Leonard and his assistants could not find room for them in the commission chamber proper. They were banked on both sides, in the rear and over the casket.

Among prominent officials and citizens who came to pay their respects were Congressman Charles A. Wolverton and his son, Donnell, Assemblymen Joseph W. Cowgill and J. Frank Crawford, Sidney P. McCord, city comptroller, Thomas C. Schneider, president of Camden County Council No. 10, New Jersey Civil Service Association.

Others at Bier

Others were Sue Devinney, secretary to Mrs. Kobus; Fred S. Caperoon; Henry Aitken, city sealer of weights and measures, Horace R. Dixon, executive director of the Camden Housing Authority; George I. Shaw, vice president of the board of education.

Sgt. Ray Smith, chairman of the Elks Crippled Children Committee and commander of East Camden Post, V.F.W.; Albert Becker, commander of Camden County Post 126, Jewish War Veterans; Dr. Howard E. Primas and Wilbur F. Dobbins, members of the Camden Housing Authority; Postmaster Emma E. Hyland; Samuel E. Fulton, member of the Camden local assistance board.  

Also former Assemblyman Rocco Palese, former Freeholder Maurice Bart and wife, County Detective James Mulligan, Deputy City Clerk William D. Sayrs, Mary King, secretary to City Clerk Reesman, Charles W. Anderson and John W. Diehl Jr., former members of the housing authority, Walter P. Wolverton, chief clerk of the public works department; Thomas J. Kenney, Maurice Hertz, Isadore Hermann, chief of the city tax title bureau; S. Raymond Dobbs; acting chief of city property, John Oziekanski, building inspector, Harry Langebein, city assessor.

Oliver H. Bond, housing manager of Clement T. Branch Village; former Judge Joseph Varbalow, acting city counsel John J. Crean, assistant City Counsel Edward V. Martino, Paul Day, secretary of city board of assessors, former Assemblyman William T. Iszard, Harry Roye, district director of NYA; Victor J. Scharle and Martin Segal, Democratic and Republican registrars, respectively, of the Camden County permanent registration bureau.  

Mrs. Marian Garrity and Mrs. Mary F. Hendricks, vice chairman and secretary respectively, of the Republican City Committee; Dr, Ethan A. Lang and Dr. Richard P. Bowman, members of the board of education; Edward J. Borden, Carl Kisselman, Harry A. Kelleher, Samuel T. French Sr., former Freeholder Walter Budniak, Coroner Paul R. Rilatt, County Treasurer Edward J. Kelleher, William Shepp, of the city legal bureau, Marie Carr, stenographer, mayor's office; Samuel T. French Jr., member, board of education.

Also John C. Trainor, member of the Camden County Board of Elections; Antonio Mecca, funeral director; Alexander Feinberg, solicitor of the housing authority, former Freeholder John T. Hanson, Sterling Parker and Paul Reihman, member of the county park commission.  

James O’Brien, commander of the Camden Disabled American Veterans, was in charge of services by veterans at the cemetery. Former Freeholder Edward J. Quinlan, county vice-commander of the American Legion, directed last night memorial services and was in charge of the firing squad at the grave.  


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