Albert Austermuhl


 

ALBERT AUSTERMUHL served the Camden Board of Education for 28 years, and from 1921 until his death in January of 1947 was the Secretary of that body.


South Jersey, A History 1624-1924

ALBERT AUSTERMUHL—In a prominent and responsible position in Camden, New Jersey, Albert Austermuhl is bearing a worthy part in the progress of the day, and as secretary of the Board of Education of this city he is giving to his work the constructive effort which makes his influence definitely useful. Mr. Austermuhl is a business executive, and his forward-looking spirit is counting for the advance of education in the present day. He is a son of Edward and Elizabeth (Schmidt) Austermuhl, both now deceased, his father a merchant by occupation and a man of large ability.

Albert Austermuhl was born in Wilmington, Delaware, March 28, 1876. The family removing to Camden in 1881, he received his early education in the local public schools and later attended the Wharton School of Finance, University of Pennsylvania. In 1890, when fourteen years of age, Mr. Austermuhl entered business affairs, securing a position in the employ of the W. and T. Alien and Company, of Philadelphia, in the capacity of clerk. Remaining with the same interest for eighteen years, he then became identified with the public service, taking over clerical responsibilities with the Board of Education. Continuing permanently in this connection, Mr. Austermuhl was elected secretary of the board in the year 1921 and his time is wholly occupied by the duties of this position. Educational progress in Camden has for many years received the attention of a broadly progressive group of men, and in this group Mr. Austermuhl stands as a representative figure. During the World War he was active as clerk of the Draft Board of Camden and bore a worthy part in all the home activities of the period. Fraternally, he is affiliated with the Free and Accepted Masons, and the Ancient Arabic Order Nobles of the Mystic Shrine, and is secretary of Camden Lodge, No. 293, Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks. He is a member of the Chamber of Commerce, and active in all the leading social organizations of the city. He attends the Baptist Church.

Albert Austermuhl married, on June 28, 1917, in Camden, New Jersey, Sara Kronenwetter, daughter of Charles and Caroline Kronenwetter, both now deceased. Mr. and Mrs. Austermuhl are the parents of two daughters: Alice, born March 4, 1918; and Elizabeth, born October 30, 1919.


Philadelphia
Inquirer

March 23, 1918

W. Penn Corson
Charles G. Garrison
William H. Fish - George H. Garland
Alonzo Wood -
H.B. Hanford
Thomas Leeson -
Conrad G. Hoell
Albert Austermuhl - John Allen
R.A. Rockhill - Hugo Koehler
F. Ketterer - Smith S. Fogg
Reuben H. Gaskill -
W.B.M. Burrell
Charles S. Boyer - Ralph Williams
Charles H. Laird Jr.
Raymond L. Warren
Charles Brower
Thomas J. McLaren
B.H. Brace - Samuel Bakley
Irvine Deakyne - Lemuel D. Horner
F.W. Ayer - Walter S. Wolf
George S. Dallas - John T. Blandy
Samuel Withers
Franklin Hawksworth
John K. Bennett -  Frederick Lange
Ben Lawton - William A. Stewart
William D. Brown

Click on Image for Enlarged View


Camden
Courier-Post

April 4, 1928

Roy R. Stewart - James H. Long - William B. Knight - William Hopkins Iszard
William F. Lehman - Albert Austermuhl - Homer F. Lotier - Samuel A. Kilpatrick
George Fisher - Rud Preisandanz Jr. - William L. Sauerhoff 

Camden Courier-Post - February 1, 1933

2 Towns to Pay Fees And Keep 164 Pupils On Camden High List
Pennsauken and Woodlynne $12,851 Behind in Bills to School Board
MANUAL TRAINING CLASSES CUT OFF I
 Domestic Science Dropped and Continuation Studies Will Cease

Less than 24 hours after the Camden Board of Education had warned school officials of Pennsauken township and Woodlynne borough that 164 pupils from those towns faced dismissal from Camden Senior High School, officials of both communities last night promised that money owed the local board would be transmitted today.

Failure of Pennsauken and Woodlynne to pay a total of $12,851.51 in tuition fees due Dec. 31, was the basis of the order sent out by Albert Austermuhl, secretary of the Camden board, on authority of Dr. Leon N. Neulen, superintendent of Camden schools. Pennsauken owes $11,790 for 150 pupils and Woodlynne's debt is $1061.51 for 14 pupils.

G. Harry Carson, Merchantville, is district clerk of the Pennsauken Board of Education. He notified members of the board when the warning from Camden was received.

J. Perry Long, president of the Pennsauken township school board, expressed surprise at the notice. He said the check covering the amount would be delivered in Camden today. b

"Pennsauken township never has defaulted in its payment to the Camden board and does not expect to do so now. The $11,790 due is for tuition for the semester which closed yesterday and we shall pay in full.

The bill sent us by the Camden board,. dated Nov. I, 1931, informed us the money was due yesterday and would have been mailed then but for the fact that the clerk was busy with numerous other matters concerning the township board's payroll."

William Daugherty, Woodlynne borough clerk, announced that the borough had transferred the necessary fund to the Woodlynne school board's account and that a. check would be sent to the Camden board today.

Despite these assurances, the Camden board still was confronted with many problems. They included the announced intention of abandoning the Camden Evening School classes at Haddon and Newton Avenues and the Continuation School at 555 Mt. Vernon street, and dropping of manual training and domestic science courses in all elementary schools.

A net reduction of $164,466 from items In the budget for the current school year was revealed Monday when the schedule of appropriations and income for the 1933-34 term was presented. In addition to this figure a move is under way to lop off $417,766 by cutting 30 percent from salaries of 800 schoolteachers, principals and supervisors. This pay slash was ordered by the Camden City Commission but still is pending because of delay in legislation on state mandatory laws which govern the amounts paid to instructors.

Teachers Oppose Plan

The Camden Teachers' Association on January 10, voted against accepting the slash, describing it as too drastic. During the past year the teachers refunded $108,000 from their pay and are under agreement to turn back $17,000 before the end of the current school term.

Protected from arbitrary slashes in the same manner as teachers, 92 school janitors have agreed to 5 and 10 percent cuts, amounting to approximately $15,000.

While complete details regarding the extent of the economy measures under consideration in the Camden school system were lacking last night, it was indicated that curtailment of various special classes in many of the city's 38 schools would be required. A number of teachers will be dropped.

Reductions Are Drastic

The special classes expected to be curtailed include art, penmanship and physical education. No appropriation .for the Continuation School, which last year totaled $22,078, was included in the 1933-34 budget. The Evening School appropriation of $2900 is wiped out.

The following table shows the amount of reduction in each item of the list of appropriations:

Administration

15,888

Instruction supervisory 88,227
Instruction proper 48,848
Operation 20,971
Maintenance 111,052
Co-ordinate activities 8,779
Fixed charges 780
Evening School, teacher 2900
Continuation School 22,078

    
Total 


$164,4611

Samuel E. Fulton, president of the board, in announcing abandonment of some of the activities, declared the budget committee made the slashes. upon recommendation  of the entire board because of the city’s financial situation. He explained that teachers dropped under the economy moves who are not eligible for pension, will be given preference when vacancies occur.


Camden Courier-Post
June 6, 1932

John H. Reiners Jr. - Albet Austermuhl
Alfred L. Dudley



Camden Courier-Post
June 18, 1932

Harry G. Robinson
Rud Priesendanz Jr.
William L. Sauerhoff
James H. Long
D. Trueman Stackhouse
Albert Austermuhl
V. McLellan Fulton

Camden Lodge No. 293
Benevolent Protective Order of Elks




Camden Courier-Post - February 8, 1933

CAMDEN ELKS TO HONOR PAST EXALTED RULERS

Past exalted rulers will be honored  tonight by Camden Lodge of Elks with a dinner, ceremonial and entertainment. 

The program will be nation-wide. A dinner will be served at 6:00 PM, followed by a business session. Harry G. Robinson, present exalted ruler, will open the ceremonial and turn the lodge over to the past officers.

The past exalted rulers expected are Samuel Kilpatrick, who served in 1900 and 1921; Dr. A. Haines Lippincott, Alexander J. Milliette, J. Harry Switzer, James H. Long, Marian Moriarity, Allen Jarvis, Albert Austermuhl, William L. Sauerhoff, former Mayor Frank S. Van Hart, D. Trueman Stackhouse, Harry Ellis, William G. Ferat, Judge Garfield Pancoast, Rudolph Preisendanz, Jr., Theodore T. Kausel, Edward J. Kelley, Mayor Roy R. Stewart, William H. Iszard, William S. Lehman and J. Harry Todd.


Camden Courier-Post - June 2, 1933

CAMDEN ELKS HOPE TO GET CONVENTION
Advisory Committee Will Present Formal Invitation for State Meet

The twenty-first annual reunion and the convention of the New Jersey State Elks Association will be held in Camden next June if efforts of the advisory board of' Camden Lodge of Elks are successful at the state meeting in Newark on June 15, 16 and 17.

Members of the advisory board for the local lodge, who are past exalted rulers of the Camden lodge, will present the invitation to hold the 1934 meeting in Camden, at the twentieth reunion and convention in Newark.

Members of the lodge have adopted a resolution confirming the action of the advisory board and plans were made to set the necessary machinery in motion to bring the 1934 convention to Camden. It was pointed out that Camden Elks have the largest home in the state.

Samuel Kilpatrick, the oldest past exalted ruler of the lodge, is head of the advisory board, and Harry G. Robinson, youngest past exalted ruler, is delegate to the state association, which is composed of past exalted rulers of all Elks lodges in New Jersey. 

Although the state association was formed in Camden, there has never been a reunion or convention of the association held here, it was pointed out.

The outstanding feature of each annual convention is the mammoth sessions, with thousands of Elks in line. It is estimated the parade would draw more than 50,000 persons to Camden, if the local lodge's invi­tation is accepted.

The Camden lodge is sending the band and patrol to Newark for the parade, which will start at 7 p. m. on June 17. Arrangements are being made to have the largest delegation in the parade represent Camden.

Past exalted rulers who comprise the advisory board, and the year they took office, follow: Samuel Kirkpatrick, 1900; Dr. A. Haines Lippincott, 1901; Alex J. Milliette, 1906; J. Harry Switzer, 1908; James H. Long, 1911; Marion Moriarty, 11113; Allen Jarvis, 1914; Albert Austermuhl, 1915; William L. Sauerhoff, 1917; Theodore T. Kausel, 1918; Garfield Pancoast, 1919; William G. Ferat, 1920; Harry Ellis, 1921; Samuel A. Dobbins, 1923; D. Trueman Stackhouse, 1924; Frank S. Van Hart, 1925; Edward J. Kelly, 1926; Rud Preisendanz, Jr., 1927; Roy R. Stewart, 1928; William H. lszard, 1929; William Lehman, 1930; J. Harry Todd, 1931, and Harry G. Robinson, 1932.

Deceased past exalted. rulers and the year they took office are: John H. Foster, 1895; W. E. B. Miller, 1896; Philip Burch, 1897; D. Harry Condit, 1898; H. L. Hartshorn, 1891; George D. Borton, 1902; Maurice Rogers, 1904; Francis Warren, 1907; E. Wilmer Collins, 1909; Lewis H. Leigh, 1910; Morris Odell, 1912, and W. Wallace Balcom, 1922. 


Camden Courier-Post * June 23, 1933

MORE RELIGION NEEDED, GRADUATES HERE TOLD 
Camden High Presents Diplomas to Class Of 261 
1500 RELATIVES VIEW EXERCISES 
Many Prizes Awarded; Judge Wells Makes Address

Win Prizes

The need of more religious education was stressed by Judge Harold B. Wells, of Bordentown, in addressing 264 graduates of Camden High School and more than 1500 relatives and friends who attended commencement exercises yesterday. 

Awards of the main scholarships and prizes were announced as follows: 

Alumni Scholarships- Tuition in University of Pennsylvania, awarded to C. Albertus Hewitt, president of Senior class; $300 toward tuition in any college chosen, awarded to Esther Hill, first honor student. 

W. F. Rose Public Speaking Contest prizes of $15 each- Awarded to Cecelia Cummings and Jack Sosenko, both of January Class. 

ESTHER HILL                             CECELIA CUMMINGS
who were granted awards at graduation ceremonies
at Camden High School yesterday

"We need more religion and more devotion," Judge Wells said, "not more money or more education. Don't boast that you don't believe in God. The whole world and all the progress it ,has made is based on a belief in God. 

"Don't sneer at religion until you know something about it-and then you won't sneer. Live for today. Don't worry about yesterday and don't think of tomorrow. Don't be a grouch- the divorce courts today are filled with grouches." 

Thomas W. Trembath, vice principal of the high school, brought a momentary hush on the large audience when he announced that Miss Clara S. Burrough, high school principal who is retiring, was not well enough to attend this, her last commencement. 

Trembath announced at the same time that students were planning to present Miss Burrough with a chair and other gifts. The movement, he said, began among students a week ago and had swept through the school surprisingly swift. 

All members of the board of education were present. In the absence of Miss Burrough, Samuel E. Fulton, president of the board, presented diplomas. Trembath presented members of the class for graduation honors. 

The invocation opening the exercises was offered by the Rev. W.W. Ridgeway, rector of St. Wilfred's Episcopal Church, Camden. 

Among the officials present were Albert M. Bean, county superintendent of schools; Dr. Leon N. Neulen, city superintendent; Charles S. Albertson, former county superintendent; Dr. William H. Pratt, chief medical inspector; Albert Austermuhl, secretary of the education board, and Lewis Liberman, assistant city solicitor. 

The valedictory and salutatory addresses were dispensed with at the high school last year and supplanted with faculty choices of speakers to represent the boys and girls of the class. 
Robert Knox Bishop, chosen to represent the boys, delivered an essay entitled "Capital Punishment and Modern Civilization." Representing the girls, Clara E. Marie Krause de livered an essay on "Music and Moods." Other honor students are Esther E. Hill, Caroline Emhof and Evelyn Harriet Ratcliffe. 

The musical part of the program follows; . "Die Schone Galathea," by Von Suppe; Farandole from "L' Arlesienne," by Bizet; Washington Post March by Sousa; Triumphal selections from "Blossomtime," by Romberg- all by the High School orchestra. There will be one chorus, "Blue Danube Waltz," by Strauss. 

As a special tribute to her work for Camden High, Miss Lucy Dean Wilson, in charge of public speaking and dramatics, and formerly musical director, was invited by Fulton to conduct the chorus in its final number. Miss Wilson took the baton from Robert B. Haley, musical director, and directed the singers. Miss Wilson is retiring this year. 

The commencement was the thirty­fourth and last annual commencement at the High School. In September it will become the Camden Academic High School under a reorganization plan that will make Woodrow Wilson Junior High School the Camden Commercial High School. 

Prizes were awarded as follows: 

Philomathean Society Prize, $10, Ruth Brennan, student in fourth year class doing. most meritorious work in English composition. 

Class of 1916 Prize in Drawing, $5, Ida Marland, 

Solomon J. and Rosa Goldstein Prizes, $5 each, given by Dr. Hyman I. Goldstein, to Howard Ruffie and Clara Krause, students attaining highest standing in science covering not less than two years of work. 

B'nai Brith Prizes, one of $15, to Elmer Pont, and $10, to Clara Krause, for high standing in mathematics. 

Class of 1923 prizes, two of $10 each, to Richard Call and Esther Hill; students showing greatest ability in athletics. 

Class of 1924 prizes, four of $5 each, to Rose DiMuro, Esther Hill, George M. Minter and Samuel Blood, good, students of January and June class with highest standing in commercial subjects.

Woman's Club prize in American History, $10, to Charles Bray, highest standing In American History. 

Department of Literature of Camden Woman's Club prizes of $10, to Alfred Pikus and Constance Di Giuseppe, for standing in English in junior year. 

Woman's Club prize in domestic science, $10, to Evelyn Cowgill, to sophomore with highest-standing in domestic science.

Mary McClelland Brown prize, $10, established by classes of 1931, to Cecelia Cummings, highest average in French through three year course. 

The Phi Beta Kappa Association of Philadelphia award, a book, "The Epic of America," autographed by the author, James Truslow Adams, to Clara Krause, highest average in academic course on completing four years of Latin. 

Beethoven Club, prize for Musical Activity (new) awarded to Leonard Zondler. 


Camden Courier-Post - February 26, 1936

Elks Add 130 Members to Rolls
At Record Initiation Tonight

Camden Lodge to Mark 40th Anniversary With Rally
PARADE AND SHOW BILLED FOR EVENT

Celebrating its 40th anniversary, Camden Lodge of Elks tonight will shatter all initiation records of recent years.

In addition to 50 new members to be received 80 former members are to be reinstated.

Carlton W. Rowand, exalted ruler, who with other officers will conduct the Initiation ceremonies in the junior ballroom of the Hotel Walt Whitman, hailed this unprecedented increase in the membership rolls as indicating "the dawn of progress and achievement."

The Elks Band will lead a parade from the lodge home, Seventh and Penn streets to the hotel. The parade is scheduled to start at 8.15 p. m. 

Preceding this, there will be a dinner in the home, in honor of the surviving charter members and all the past exalted rulers. 

Charter members, who 40 years ago, aided in the organization of the lodge, are Frank A. Ward, Charles L. Bowman, Dr. A.H. Lippincott, Dr. J. F. Leavitt, Fred W. George, T. L. Bear, William M. Fithian, Everett Ackley, Fithian S. Simmons, Philip Wilson, Paul E. Quinn, John N. Kadel, William G. Maguire and Maurice Hertz.

Following the initiation ceremonies there will be a floor show by a cast of entertainers from Frankie Palumbo's Philadelphia Cafe.

Besides Rowand, officers of the lodge are Ernest E. Lindner, esteemed leading knight; William F. Huff, esteemed loyal knight; Lawrence V. White, esteemed lecturing knight; Albert Austermuhl, secretary; Homer H. Lotier, treasurer; C. Frederick Petry, esquire; Samuel A. Dobbins, tiler; D. Trueman Stackhouse, chaplain; William A. Davis, inner guard; Ralph Wiley, Jr., organist; Frank M. Travaline, Jr., delegate to state association; George B. Shaner, Theodore C. Roller and John Emmel, trustees.

Camden Lodge. No. 293 was instituted January 24, 1895, with a membership including judges, lawyers, physicians, merchants, manufacturers, artisans and city and county officials. 

The organization meeting was held on the third floor of the Temple Building, Market Street near Fourth. John H. Fort was elected first exalted ruler. Since then many men prominent in the professional, political and business life of the city have filled the post. 


Camden Courier-Post - February 1, 1938

BOARD Of EDUCATION SHIFTS 14 TEACHERS
Appoints 2 Instructors and Pensions 2 Others; Wilson Enrollment High

The Camden Board Education last night approved transfers of 14 teachers, the appointment of two new instructors and the retirement on pension of two others.

The board then adjourned until 11.45 a. m. today and it was announced the 1938-39 board will be organized at noon when Commissioner Mary W. Kobus is expected to be re-elected president.

When the report of the teachers committee making recommendations for appointments, transfers and retirements was read it was approved by unanimous vote and without comment.

Following the meeting Carlton W. Rowand explained that most of the transfers were made to meet emergencies in teaching classes at Woodrow Wilson High School, where more than 1500 students will be enrolled for the second semester, be ginning today.

Rowand explained that enrollment at the Wilson school is the highest in its history, due to many students taking up English and commercial courses instead of entering Camden senior high school, which will have an enrollment of approximately 1540 students, the smallest in several years.

List of Transfers

Transfers affecting teachers in junior high schools are: Louis E. Feinstein from Hatch Junior High School to commercial business organization, Wilson High School; Frank E. Sias, from Cramer Junior High to physical education, Wilson High; Jessie W. McMurtrie from Cramer Junior High School, to physical education, Wilson High; Wilton D. Greenway, from Cramer Junior High School to mathematics, Camden High; Elizabeth Dickinson, from Bonsall; to English, Cramer Junior High; Mrs. Mildred C. Simmons, from English to mathematics, Cramer Junior High; Miss Celia Boudov, from Hatch Junior High to departmental geography, science, and penmanship, Liberty School; Mrs. Elizabeth R. Myers assigned to English, Hatch Junior High;

Thelma L. Little transferred from, Grade 5 to Cooperative Departmental; Dudley school.

The following elementary school transfers, also effective today, are:

Beatrice W. Beideman from Starr to Sharp school; Mrs. Esther S. Finberg from Cramer to Broadway school; Dorothy M. Lippincott from Parkside to Dudley school; Mrs. Alva T. Corson from Washington to Broadway school, and Mary G. Cathell from Washington to Dudley school.

Teachers whose retirement was approved are Carolina W. Taylor, Grade 2, Broadway school, and William M. Thayer, mathematics [Camden] senior high school. Both teachers had resigned and applied for their pensions, the report read.

Appointments Made

Nathan Enten was appointed as physical education teacher in the Cramer school and Harry S. Manashil was appointed commercial teacher in Hatch school. Each will receive $1400, annually. The board also approved the appointment of Florence M. Dickinson as principal of Lincoln school at a salary of $2200 annually.

The assignment of Miss Grace Hankins as principal of Parkside school to succeed Miss Dickinson also was approved. Ethel Thegen was approved for appointment as assistant librarian at the Camden senior high school at a salary of $5.50 a day. All appointments are effective today.

To relieve overcrowded conditions among pupils the board approved the transfer of 7A and 7B classes from the Washington to the Cramer school.

The board vote to open a library in the Cramer school and Raymond G. Price, supervisor of building was instructed to provide, the necessary equipment.

A resolution of condolence upon the death of Ethel C. Wenderoth, for 19 years a teacher in the Broadway School was passed and secretary Albert Austermuhl was instructed to send a copy to members of the deceased teacher's family.

2 New Faces on Board

The board received and filed a letter from Mayor George E. Brunner in which he stated he had appointed Mrs. George W. Tash, Samuel T. French Jr. as new members and had re-appointed Robert Burk Johnson as a board member.

William B. Sullender, of the Tenth Ward, who was not re-appointed, was commended by the members for his services. E. George Aaron said he regretted the fact that Sullender was leaving as a member and wished him success. Others joined in this tribute.

Sullender in reply thanked the members for their co-operation during his term of office.


Camden Courier-Post * February 15, 1938

CITY SCHOOL BUDGET INCREASED $135,225
Pay Restorations, New Employees Held Cause of Advance in Appropriations

Camden City's school budget for the 1938-1939 fiscal school year, showing an increase of $135,225, was adopted by the Board of Education last night.

Commissioner Mary W. Kobus, board president, explained the budget increase is almost entirely due to the restoration one-half of the existing 10 percent salary cuts and also to the addition of 20 new teachers and two new janitors.

The president added that 15 of the new teachers are assigned to the recently enlarged Davis School, three to the two high schools and two to junior schools.

No indication was given of how much the increased amount will affect the tax rate.

Meeting Scheduled Today

Mrs. Kobus said she with other board members did everything possible to prevent an increase and pointed out that the only unusual increase, other than teachers' salaries was for supplies and materials.
The matter of a tax rate will be decided after a joint meeting today of the board members with the members of the board of school estimates, Mrs. Kobus said.

In making up the budget the board members pared several appropriations in an effort to apportion $43,000 as a sponsor's share to obtain a PWA grant of $232,000 for additions, alterations and improvements to several schools.

The appropriation for teachers is $1,487,061, compared to $1,388,745 for the last fiscal year, an increase of $98,316.

For other salaries, including executive, office, clerical and janitors $262,579 was appropriated. The total for the previous year was |236,386, an increase of $27,868.

The amount for supplies, materials and other items is $226,910, an increase of $9160 over the previous year when the total was $217,850.

State Funds Awaited

The city's apportionment of revenue to be appropriated is $1,692,225. In estimated sources of revenue, $100,000 is expected to come from an additional state appropriation. Additional state funds include, appropriation, $169,463; manual training, $5000; crippled children, $1500; evening schools, $500.

Other anticipated revenue items include tuition fees, $1000; teachers absence refunds, $3000; miscellaneous, $3000.

Secretary Albert Austermuhl stated additional funds may be anticipated from enrollment of students from schools outside the city. He also stated the state has not paid the city its share for the education of crippled children. The amount in arrears for two past years is $3000, he said.

For instructions in elementary, high, junior high schools and manual training the amount is fixed at $1,431,117.

The sum of $135,884 is set up for supervisory instruction, with $41,615 for administration.
Costs for operation of elementary schools is placed at $130,067. The cost for the operation of the high schools is $47,605 with $37,750 appropriated for junior high schools.

Other budget items include coordinated activities, $40,956; property maintenance cost, $74,455; fixed charges, $13,760; auxiliary agencies, $8900; special schools, $15,116. 

Salary Total Increased

Total salaries for teachers in elementary, kindergarten, special classes and in correction classes total, $874,955. For high school teachers the amount is $259,467. Junior school teachers salaries total $156,169.

The increases for teachers are: elementary and other classes, $53,-535; high schools, $19,146; junior schools, $10,279. Manual training costs increased $5066.

Cost for elementary school janitor salaries is set at $81,217, an increase of $11,428. Most of the increase is due to additional janitorial service required for the Davis school annex.

The sum of $33,655 is appropriated for high school janitors, an increase of $1815. The amount for junior high school janitors is $27,000, an increase of $1483..


Camden Courier-Post * February 16, 1938
School Estimates Board Defers Action on $1,978,225 Budget
SUM HELD TOO HIGH BY CITY OFFICIALS; REDUCTIONS SOUGHT
Mrs. Kobus Urges Employ ment of Auditor to Aid in Paring Costs

TEACHER EXPENSE RISES

The Board of School Estimates met yesterday and adjourned with out taking any action on the proposed $1,978,225 budget approved by the Board of Education.

The education budget is $135,244 more than the $1,842,981 provided for the 1937-38 year.
Mayor Brunner and City Commissioner Hartmann insisted at the board of estimates meeting that the budget was too high and would have to be pruned. At the sug gestion of Commissioner Kobus, who also is president of the Board of Education, the meeting authorized City Comptroller McCord to employ an auditor to report on school costs.

It seemed the sense of yester day's meeting that the items calling for additional teachers and janitors would have to be cut and that perhaps employment of new teachers for the Davis School to take care of Westfield Acres pupils could be reduced by transfer of some teachers from other schools.

Held Due to Salaries

In addition to the commissioners, the estimates board includes Mrs. Alice K. Predmore and E. George Aaron. The latter was absent.

The estimates board, which must approve the budget, adjourned in definitely to meet again at the call of the Mayor when McCord's audit is completed.

Mrs. Kobus explained that virtually the entire increase is due to restoration of one-half of the exist ing 10 percent salary cuts and the proposed additions of 20 new teachers and two janitors.

The president added that 15 of the new teachers are assigned to the recently enlarged Davis School, three to the two high schools and two to junior schools.

Half of the increase will appear in Camden City's 1938 budget, which operates on a calendar year as contrasted with the school fiscal year.

Five-Cent Rise on 1938 

The total rise is equivalent to 10 cents on the tax rate, so that half the amount means a five-cent increase on the 1938 rate

Mrs. Kobus said she with other board members did everything possible to prevent an increase and pointed out that the only unusual increase, other than teachers' salaries was for supplies and materials.

In making up the budget the board members pared several appropriations in an effort to apportion $43,000 as a sponsor's share to obtain a PWA grant of $232,000 for additions, alterations and im provements to several schools.

The appropriation for teachers is $1,487,061, compared to $1,388,745 for the last fiscal year, an increase of $98,316.

For other salaries, including executive, office, clerical and janitors, $262,579 was appropriated. The total for the previous year was $236,386, an increase of $27,868.

The amount for supplies, materials and other items is $226,910, an increase of $9160 over the pre vious year when the total was $217,850.

The city's apportionment of revenue to be appropriated is $1,692,225. In estimated sources of revenue, $100,000 is expected to come from an additional state appropriation. Additional state funds include, appropriation, $169,463; manual training, $5000; crippled children, $1500; evening schools, $500.

Other anticipated revenue items include tuition fees, $1000; teachers absence refunds, $3000; miscellaneous, $3000.

Secretary Albert Austermuhl stated additional funds may be anticipated from enrollment of students from schools outside the city. He also stated the state has not paid the city its share for the "education of crippled children. The amount in arrears for two past years is $3000, 
he said.

For instructions in elementary, high, junior high schools and manual training the amount is fixed at $1,431,117.

The sum of $135,884 is set up for supervisory instruction, with $41,615 for administration.

Costs for operation of elementary schools is placed at $130,067. The cost for the operation of the high schools is $47,605 with $37,750 appropriated for junior high schools.

Other budget items include co ordinated activities, $40,956; property maintenance cost, $74,455; fix ed charges, $13,760; auxiliary agencies, $8900; special schools, $15,116. 

Total salaries for teachers in elementary, kindergarten, special classes and correction classes total $874,955. For high school teachers the amount is $259,467. Junior school teachers salaries total $156,169.

The increases for teachers are: elementary and other classes, $53,535; high schools, $19,146; junior schools, $10,279. Manual training costs increased $5066.

Cost for elementary school janitor salaries is set at $81,217, an increase of $11,428. Most of the increase is due to additional janitorial service required for the Davis school annex.

The sum of $33,655 is appropriated for high school janitors, an increase of $1815. The amount for junior high school janitors is $27,000, an increase of $1483..


Camden Courier-Post * July 1, 1941
CRIPPLED CHILDREN TO ATTEND OUTING
100 Little Folks to Be Guests on Sgt. Ray Smith's Birthday

More than 100 crippled children from this vicinity will be entertained at the seventh annual Sgt. Ray Smith's crippled children's day and birthday party, next Monday.

The party, an annual affair, is staged by the Elks' crippled childrens committee and the Sgt. Ray's birthday party committee.

The youngsters will meet at the Elks Home, 808 Market street, and will be taken to Clementon Park in buses where Theodore Gibbs, manager of the park will throw open the entire facilities of the park for the crippled children, staging a special show in the after­noon. A luncheon will be served at the park by the committee.

At four o'clock the youngsters will be taken to the Silver Lake Inn where a special amateur show will be staged on the lawn by the crippled children themselves. A sports entertainment will be staged by Otto O'Keefe, of the Veteran Boxers Association of Philadelphia, then dinner arranged by John E. Weber, proprietor of the Silver Lake Inn. During the dinner hour the youngsters, will be entertained, by talent from Philadelphia and nearby night clubs, with Otto O'Keefe presenting the acts.

After the children's party, a dinner will be served in honor of Sgt. Ray Smith, on his 46th birth­day.

Officers of the Crippled Childrens Committee headed by Smith include Homer H. Lotier, treasurer, and A. Lincoln Michener, secretary. Mrs. Florence A. Lovett is executive secretary.

The party committee is headed by Carlton W. Rowand and Charles W. Anderson. Surrogate Frank B. Hanna is the treasurer. 

Those who have been invited to attend are Mayor George E. Brunner, Congressman Charles A. Wolverton, Prosecutor Samuel P. Orlando, Firmin Michel, Albert E. Burling, Albert Austermuhl, secretary of the Board of Education, George I. Shaw, Mary W. Kobus, director of Public Safety; Dr. Henry J. Schireson, Camden county freeholders Robert Worrell, Mrs. Alice Predmore, S. Norcross 3rd, members or Veterans of Foreign Wars of Camden County Council and many business men and civic leaders.

Ladies of the Elks' Auxiliary who will assist with the children throughout the day are: Mrs. Alice Heck, president; Mrs. Sarah Austermuhl, Mrs. Reba Crawford, Mrs. Emma Vandergrift, Mrs. Tillie Weber, Mrs. Helene Sauerhoff, Mrs. Anna Rose, Miss Emma Lee, Mrs. Sallie Moore, Mrs. Marion Holdcraft, Mrs. Etta Preisendanz, Mrs. Eva Poland, Mrs. Lena Jantzen, Mrs. May Talman and Mrs. Irene Berg.


Camden Courier-Post - August 26, 1941

Henry Magin Laid to Rest By War Veteran Buddies
TRUCKS OF FLOWERS IN FUNERAL CORTEGE

Funeral services for City Commissioner Henry Magin were held today with his colleagues in official and veterans circles participating.

Services were conducted in city commission chambers on the second floor of city hall, in charge of Rev. Dr. W.W. Ridgeway, rector of St. Wilfrid's Episcopal Church.

The casket was carried by war veteran associates of the public works director, who died from a heart attack Friday. A color guard from the Veterans of Foreign Wars and the American Legion preceded the casket, followed by the four remaining members of the city commission, Mayor George Brunner and commissioners E. George Aaron, Mrs. Mary W. Kobus and Dr. David S. Rhone.

A guard of honor lined both sides of' city hall steps, 22 policemen on one side and 22 firemen on the other, representing Magin's age, 44 years.

Hundreds of men and women waited outside the building to pay their respects as the solemn procession filed by. Mayor Brunner had declared this morning a holiday for city employees. The casket was borne by Thomas Jackson and Samuel Magill, both past Legion commanders; Leon McCarty, past commander of August Walter Chapter, Disabled American Veterans; Richard Jermyn, past commander of Post 1270, Veterans of Foreign Wars; Benjamin P. Thomas, past captain of Sparrow Ship No. 1269. V. F. W.; and William Miller, past State commander, D. A. V.  

Three trucks were required to carry the floral pieces from the scene of the services to the National Cemetery at Beverly, where burial took place.  

An estimated 8000 persons from all walks of life paid their respects to the late official by viewing the body as it lay in state in the commission chambers.

The throng of mourners of Camden city and county was the largest to converge on a public building since the funeral of Fire Chief Charles Worthington, who was killed while fighting a fire almost 20 years ago. His body was placed on public view in the rotunda of the old county courthouse.

File Past Bier  

A continuous progression of people filed past the flag draped bier for more than three and one-half hours. Scores of Republicans and hundreds of Democrats joined in the tribute.

Services were conducted by Camden lodges of Elks and Moose. Military rites were conducted by the Fairview Post, American Legion, of which Magin was a founder and past commander. The tribute was led by Mitchell Halin, post commander, and C. Richard Allen, past department commander. 

James W. Conner, chief clerk of the city water bureau and past State Commander of the V.F.W., conducted rites at the grave.  

Mayor Brunner and Commissioners Kobus, Aaron, and Rhone came early and remained throughout the hours of viewing. Mrs. Helen Magin, the widow, and daughter Helen, attired in deep mourning, arrived shortly after 7:00 PM.

Embraces Widow, Daughter  

Commissioner Kobus, who knelt in prayer before the bier, arose and went over to Mrs. Magin and her daughter. Mrs. Kobus embraced and kissed the widow and daughter of the late commissioner. They were in tears.  

Three firemen and three policemen maintained a vigil as a guard of honor. They were Patrolmen Jack Kaighn, George Weber, and William Deery and Firemen Arthur Batten, Warren Carter and William Reed.

American Legion and V. F. W. members in uniform alternated as members of the military guard of honor. A detail of 50 policemen was under command of Acting Lieutenant John Garrity. Fifty firemen, under supervision of Deputy Chief Walter Mertz, assisted the patrolmen in handling the crowd, which at times choked the stairways leading to the second floor.  

Freeholders Arrive  

Albert H. Molt, director of the Board of Freeholders and Freeholders John J. Tull, Oscar Moore, Ventorino Francesconi, Stanley Ciechanowski, Earl Armstrong and Emil J. McCall arrived shortly after 7:00 PM. Moore and Tull wore American Legion overseas caps. Albert S. Marvel, clerk of the board, accompanied the freeholders.

Employees of the various bureaus in the department of public works, headed by Commissioner Magin, came in delegations with the highway bureau having 150, the largest number.  

Frank A. Abbott, acting director of the department, accompanied by James P. Carr, superintendent of Streets; led the highway bureau employees. Abbott is deputy director of revenue and finance and first assistant to Mayor Brunner. He was named by Brunner as acting director until the City Commission elects Mr. Magin's successor.

County Clerk Frank J. Suttill, City Clerk Clay W. Reesman, Fire Chief John H. Lennox and James A. Howell, chief of the city electrical bureau, attended, as did Albert Austermuhl, secretary of the board of education. Every city department sent a floral piece.

Outstanding Floral Tribute

Outstanding among the floral tributes was a six-toot broken circle of varied flowers, an offering from Mayor Brunner and Commissioners Kobus, Aaron, and Rhone.

A floral chair was sent by the Camden Police and Firemen’s Association. The word “Rest” was made up of flowers. The offering of the Veterans League of South Jersey, an organization formed by Commissioner Magin and of which he was the first president, was a large floral pillow.

The freeholders and county officials gave a large floral basket. Floral tributes came from the employees of the board of education, the RCA Manufacturing Company, the police and fire bureaus, Pyne Point Athletic Association, the Elks, Moose and several Democratic clubs.  

The floral tributes came in such numbers yesterday afternoon that Funeral Director Harry Leonard and his assistants could not find room for them in the commission chamber proper. They were banked on both sides, in the rear and over the casket.

Among prominent officials and citizens who came to pay their respects were Congressman Charles A. Wolverton and his son, Donnell, Assemblymen Joseph W. Cowgill and J. Frank Crawford, Sidney P. McCord, city comptroller, Thomas C. Schneider, president of Camden County Council No. 10, New Jersey Civil Service Association.

Others at Bier

Others were Sue Devinney, secretary to Mrs. Kobus; Fred S. Caperoon; Henry Aitken, city sealer of weights and measures, Horace R. Dixon, executive director of the Camden Housing Authority; George I. Shaw, vice president of the board of education.

Sgt. Ray Smith, chairman of the Elks Crippled Children Committee and commander of East Camden Post, V.F.W.; Albert Becker, commander of Camden County Post 126, Jewish War Veterans; Dr. Howard E. Primas and Wilbur F. Dobbins, members of the Camden Housing Authority; Postmaster Emma E. Hyland; Samuel E. Fulton, member of the Camden local assistance board.  

Also former Assemblyman Rocco Palese, former Freeholder Maurice Bart and wife, County Detective James Mulligan, Deputy City Clerk William D. Sayrs, Mary King, secretary to City Clerk Reesman, Charles W. Anderson and John W. Diehl Jr., former members of the housing authority, Walter P. Wolverton, chief clerk of the public works department; Thomas J. Kenney, Maurice Hertz, Isadore Hermann, chief of the city tax title bureau; S. Raymond Dobbs; acting chief of city property, John Oziekanski, building inspector, Harry Langebein, city assessor.

Oliver H. Bond, housing manager of Clement T. Branch Village; former Judge Joseph Varbalow, acting city counsel John J. Crean, assistant City Counsel Edward V. Martino, Paul Day, secretary of city board of assessors, former Assemblyman William T. Iszard, Harry Roye, district director of NYA; Victor J. Scharle and Martin Segal, Democratic and Republican registrars, respectively, of the Camden County permanent registration bureau.  

Mrs. Marian Garrity and Mrs. Mary F. Hendricks, vice chairman and secretary respectively, of the Republican City Committee; Dr, Ethan A. Lang and Dr. Richard P. Bowman, members of the board of education; Edward J. Borden, Carl Kisselman, Harry A. Kelleher, Samuel T. French Sr., former Freeholder Walter Budniak, Coroner Paul R. Rilatt, County Treasurer Edward J. Kelleher, William Shepp, of the city legal bureau, Marie Carr, stenographer, mayor's office; Samuel T. French Jr., member, board of education.

Also John C. Trainor, member of the Camden County Board of Elections; Antonio Mecca, funeral director; Alexander Feinberg, solicitor of the housing authority, former Freeholder John T. Hanson, Sterling Parker and Paul Reihman, member of the county park commission.  

James O’Brien, commander of the Camden Disabled American Veterans, was in charge of services by veterans at the cemetery. Former Freeholder Edward J. Quinlan, county vice-commander of the American Legion, directed last night memorial services and was in charge of the firing squad at the grave.  


Camden High School
1942 Purple & Gold Yearbook
 

BOARD OF EDUCATION

DR. ETHAN A. LANG
President
DR. HENRY WISNIEWSKI
Vice-President
ALBERT AUSTERMUHL Secretary
MRS.
MARY W. KOBUS
MRS.
ALICE KLINE PREDMORE
DR. RICHARD BOWMAN
SAMUEL T. FRENCH
BENJAMIN MACKLER
ALBERT E. OSMOND
RUSSELL L. WELDY
DR. LEON N. NEULEN
Superintendent of Schools
ALFRED L. DUDLEY
Superintendent of Supplies
RAYMOND G. PRICE
Supervisor of Janitors and Buildings

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