William
J.
Rose


WILLIAM JEFFRIES ROSE was born on January 29, 1872, in Philadelphia, the son of William and Kate Jeffries Rose. He was the great-great grandson of Benjamin Chew, the chief justice of Pennsylvania, and brother of Robert J. Rose of Camden Police Department, who died in 1921.

At the age of 10, Captain Rose moved to Burlington to attend St. Paul's Episcopal Academy, which later merged with Riley's Military Academy, of Haddonfield, where was educated and resided after graduation. He was a member of Haddonfield's first baseball and football teams from 1891 to 1895. He was football coach at Ursinus College from 1890 to 1893.

In 1896 he married, the former the former Miss Ella G. 'Thompson, daughter of William .J. Thompson, of the Eighth Ward, former city treasurer and councilman. He was appointed to the fire department in 1899 and made a lieutenant in 1912 and captain in 1924. Captain Rose passed an examination for battalion chief in 1929. 

Camden Fire Department records from 1931 show William Rose living at 226 Chestnut Avenue in Woodlynne, New Jersey.

One of the most popular men in the department, Captain Rose retired on pension because of his heart ailment on March 1, 1936 with a perfect record and high honors. He passed away on March 3, 1939.


Philadelphia Inquirer
November 24, 1899

Cooper B. Hatch - George W. Whyte
William Penn Hook & Ladder Co. No. 1
First Baptist Church - Edgar Bolton
John W. Vanhart - W. Scott Franklin
Benjamin Kellum - Charles Robinson
George B. Wade - Albert Jones
George Cox - Edward Weston
Samuel Peoples - Harry B. Middleton
Harry Burroughs - Robert W. Colkett
William G. Hillman - James E. Navin
Charles Todd - Daniel Smith
Peter B. Carter - Alfred Hayden
Henry Elliott - Josiah Sage
Samuel Price - William Rose
Charles Sturgis - Daniel Grimes
Harry Wagner - Augustus Kester
William Simpson

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Philadelphia Inquirer - June 24, 1900
Peter B. Carter - Charles H. Robinson - William Rose - Samuel M. Price
Engine Company 2 - South Front Street - South 2nd Street - Kaighn Avenue
Cooper Hospital

Philadelphia Inquirer - May 21, 1906
Engine Company 8 - Sycamore Street - Nettie Dickson
Alfred Hayden - Seth Monnelll - William Rose -  William "Sunlight" Byers 

Philadelphia Inquirer - May 29, 1906
Judge Joline - Frank Walters - John Brooks - Fireside New Years Association - Kaighn Avenue - Charles H. Ellis
Joseph E. Nowrey - David B. Peterson - Joseph Potter - Alfred Dudley - South Camden Pleasure Club - Eugene McCarthy Alfred Sayrs - Charles Welsh - John Genther - William Barr - William Rose - John A. Dold - Peter Gray - Joseph Jones
Federal Street - East Camden - John W. Coleman - Levi E. Farnham

Philadelphia Inquirer
June 23, 1907

White Lead Works - South 6th Street
Everett Street - Kaighn Avenue
William Rose - Samuel S. Elfreth

 

Philadelphia Inquirer - December 4, 1907

Lewis Buzine - Wright Cox - Seth D. Monnell - William Miller  - William Rose William Elberson


Jersey Journal
Bayonne, New Jersey

October 27, 1909

William Tatum - William Rose

 


Philadelphia Inquirer - January 6, 1910

John H. Vickers - William O. Sawyer - Newton Ash - William Miller
Samuel Lodge - William Rose - William Elberson
Scott Franklin - Andrew Miller


Jersey Journal
Bayonne, New Jersey
October 31, 1911
 

Philadelphia Inquirer - August 10, 1913
Engine Company 1 - Engine Company 2 - Holy Trinity Lutheran Church
Mount Vernon Street - Rev. William Brubaker
Mortica Clark - James Norris Ellis - George H. Hunt 
Seth Monnell - John McTaggart - Fred Hall - William Rose

Philadelphia Inquirer - August 31, 1919

Howard Currie - William Judge - William Walton - William Rose John Plum - Roy Saunders - James Howell - Earl Vansant Charles Gladney 


Camden Courier-Post - June 12, 1933

Old Centreville Families 
Dr. Donges, Mills, Schepperkittes, Covely and Other Men Wrought Through Years to Bring Needed Improvements to District

By BEN COURTER

WHEN a larger community annexes an adjoining district the newer area is generally regarded, for a time at least, as a step-child. Older residents of East Camden will bear out that truism when they recall how difficult it was to obtain improvements. Years before, Newton Township which became part of Camden, had had the same experience. Under such circumstances, it requires tireless energy on the part of leading men to get what their district needs. Demands often go unheeded unless the community is fortunate in having those of spirit who insist on street improvements, water extension, lighting facilities and schools. That was more in evidence half a century ago than now, of course, for Camden itself was little more than a large village. 

Down in Centreville there were men who looked after the interests of their constituents, who slowly but surely obtained, improvements and who insisted on being recognized by the powers that be. No one may think of old Centreville without thought of Dr. John W. Donges, whose value to not only that section but Camden at large, has been expatiated upon in these annals. He was not only a leading physician, with a practice extending into Camden, but a leader in many civic movements, and any article on that era would be incomplete without allusion again to the doctor whose services as a real family physician are part of the traditions of many old families. 

Came Here In 1872 

He came here in 1872 from Schuylkill County, Pennsylvania, when his health was affected by overwork through loyalty to his patients. He bought the drugstore at Ferry Avenue and Broadway, remaining there for many years. It was there Supreme Court Justice Ralph W. E. Donges spent his boyhood. 

There, too, Dr. Clarence B. Donges and Attorney Raymond Donges were boys. Grant E. Kirk, clerk in his store, later becoming a physician and for several years a member of council and at one time being prominently boomed for mayor, married their sister. Dr. Donges was elected to council in 1878 on the Democratic ticket, itself an evidence of the high regard in which he was held, for the Eighth Ward generally was rock­ribbed Republican. Until the early part of this century he resided in his old place, but later went to Broadway and Clinton Streets. In later years, after he had retired, he was city assessor, "just to keep busy." He died a few years ago, well in his 80s, mourned by a great host of Camdenites.

There was another widely known Centreville family of the old days, that of Samuel Mills, who had his own abattoir at Broadway and Jackson Street, where city-dressed meats were provided before the days of car refrigeration brought supplies from the great packing places in Chicago. His son, Charlie, was long a member of the Board of Education, while another, William, was a city councilman. Edward Milis, another son, was excise commissioner 35 years ago in the days when there was plenty of trouble with Sunday sellers. 

Cornelius Schepperkotter was a factor in politics down that way, too, having a grocery store on Ferry Avenue at Ninth, later moving to the southwest corner when the Charles Sumner School was built. That school was torn down two years ago for the recreation center. Schepperkotter was a member of the old Board of Public Instruction in the late 90's, named by Mayor Cooper B. Hatch. In later years and until his death, he was superintendent of Evergreen Cemetery. He was father of Mrs. Frank S. Albright, wife of City Clerk Albright

Frank Covely 

Shortly after the New York shipyard was opened, there moved to the "Hill" Frank D. L. Covely, who became a joiner and for years was foreman of the joiner shop. He was widely known as a secret society man and also as an effective campaign speaker for the G. O. P. He was a member of the Board of Education. 

He sought to go to council, but that was at the time Kirk was a power in the ward. Covely laughingly used to tell of a meeting all set for him from which all save the colored folk were drawn away through strategy of his party opponents. But for ten years he was a member of the Board of Recreation Commissioners. 

That movement owed much to his work. Nor did he forget his colored friends, for he had a playground established for them at Ferry Avenue and Phillips Street and the large one [Staley Park- PMC] at Seventh and Jefferson streets. Long afterward that was named for another city official, but Covely's friends said it should have been for him, as a monument to his services for the boys and girls of Centreville. He died a few years ago at Bellmawr in his 70s, after a hectic experience as a chicken raiser at Port Norris. 

There, too, was William Dorrell, superintendent of the old "Narrow Guage" who was one of the leading spirits in the paving of Broadway, nearly 60 years ago the big issue of that section. He lived in a house along the railroad still standing, as the hospital and dispensary of the shipyard. 

Mention has been made of the Ferrises, the Helmbolds, the Yeagers, of Squire James D. Chester and Squire F. Joseph Rouh. There was also William O. Thompson, the leading contractor down that way for many years and Theodore Tiedeken, who established the wagon works on Van Hook Street, Martin Ewe, who had the hotel at Broadway and Emerald, and down the street a bit James Croker, who operated Tammany Hall. Forty years ago there was one of the best young athletes of the city, Thomas Nicholas, now retired Camden fire chief. He was down in old No. 3 with Bill Rose, long a fire captain, Bill Miller, Al James, Sam Lodge, Gus Dold and Jim Ware.

Many of these old timers have passed on, but others are still in the flesh but scattered to all parts of the city but it may be said the survivors look back on the days that were down there in Centreville with an interest that does not dim with the passing years.


Camden Courier-Post * March 4, 1939

CAPTAIN ROSE DIES; RETIRED FIREMAN
Heart Attack at Dinner Given in His Honor Proves Fatal at 67

 William   Jeffries   Rose, 67, retired captain of the Camden Fire Department, died last night in Cooper Hospital from a heart attack suffered on February 15 while he was attending a dinner of the Firemen's Mutual Benevolent Association, Local No. 5.

One of the most popular men in the department, Captain Rose retired on pension because of his heart ailment on March 1, 1936 with a perfect record and high honors. He leaves his widow, Mrs. Ella G. Rose; a son, William J. Rose, Jr., of 522 North-Fifth Street;
daughter, Mrs. Grace Seward, of Philadelphia, and a half-sister, Mrs. Mabel Letts, of 720 North Fifth Street.

Captain Rose lived at 110 Powelton Avenue, Woodlynne, since 1925. He was attending the dinner where was to have been honored by John Read, of Kearny, State treasurer rer of the association, when he was stricken and became unconscious. He was placed in an oxygen tent on his arrival at the hospital and revived the next day.

The tent was removed Saturday after a slight rally but on Tuesday another attack occurred and he was placed in the tent again until his death.

Descendant of Judge

Captain Rose was born on January 29, 1872, in Philadelphia, the son of William and Kate Jeffries Rose. He was the great-great grandson of Benjamin Chew, the chief justice of Pennsylvania, and brother of Robert J. Rose of Camden Police Department, who died in 1921.

At the age of 10, Captain Rose moved to Burlington to attend St. Paul's Episcopal Academy, which later merged with Riley's Military Academy, of Haddonfield, where was educated and resided after graduation. He was a mcmber of Haddonfield's first baseball and football teams from 1891 to 1895. He was football coach at Ursinus College from 1890 to 1893.

In 1896 he married, the former the former Miss Ella G. 'Thompson, daughter of William .J. Thompson, of the Eighth Ward, former city treasurer and councilman. He was appointed to the fire department, in 1899 and made a lieutenant in 1912 and captain in 1924. Captain Rose passed an examination for battalion chief in 1929.

In 1937, Captain Rose entered politics briefly to run for freeholder on the Regular Republican ticket. He was the first secretary and treasurer of the New Jersey Firemen's Benevolent Association and was the oldest living member of the association until his death. He was one of the organizers of the Camden Fire and Police Club and one of its first trustees.

Member of Several Groups

Other organizations of which he was a member were Wyoming Tribe, No, 55, Improved Order of Red Men; Camden  County Firemen's  Association,  Second Alarmers' Association, Woodlynne Organization Republican Club,  Camden County Regular Republican Association, Box 315 Association, Woodlynne M.E. Church and Woodlynne Men's Bible Class.

When Captain Rose was appointed December 1, 1889, by the Fire Committee of Camden City Council he did not go on active duty until March 1, 1900, because the firehouse at 617 Kaighn avenue had not been completed.

He was stationed at various times at No. 8 Engine Company, No. 7 Engine Company, and at No. 3 Truck Company. His last assignment was at the first named company, 617 Kaighn Avenue.

Veteran of Big Fires

He received an early baptism in fighting fires. Two months after he went on duty he assisted in fighting the spectacular blaze that destroyed the last old municipal market house in the city, located on the present site of Public Service building.

This fore occurred on Sunday afternoon, May 13, 1900. More than 20 properties in the vicinity were damaged. Rose was also one of the firemen at another much-talked-of fire that destroyed the old armory at West and Mickle Streets. Three firemen were killed.

Captain Rose was injured several times but never seriously. He was s firefighter in days when firemen worked an average of 20 hours daily and were compelled to sleep in their clothes while on duty. This was before the inauguration of the present two-platoon system.

Rose had the reputation among his fellow firemen of never sending members of his company into a place where he wouldn’t lead them at a fire. He was a close friend of the late Fire Chief Thomas Nicholas.

Funeral arrangements are being completed.


Camden Courier-Post * October 29, 1931

47 MORE MEN JOIN LEAGUE TO AID BAIRD
Professional and Business Leaders Back Camden Man for Governor

Forty-seven more prominent professional and business men yesterday joined the Baird-for-Governor Business Men's League and pledged themselves to work actively in interest of David Baird Jr., for governor, and add special impetus to his campaign.

The league was organized this week at an enthusiastic meeting of 18 outstanding Baird supporters in professional and business life at the Camden Club, 315 Cooper Street. The league membership is open only to business, professional and industrial leaders who are not holding public office and who are not politicians.

The latest enrollments among community leaders pledging themselves to devote themselves to the Baird cause are the following:

F. Morse Archer, president of the First Camden National Bank; Clinton. L. Bardo, president of the New York Shipbuilding Company and of the New Jersey Taxpayers' Association; George C. Baker, of the Baker­Flick Company; Watson Shallcross, president of the Camden County Chamber of Commerce; Howard J. Dudley, Broadway merchant; Thomas E. French, prominent attorney; J. David Stern, publisher of the Courier-Post newspapers and of the Philadelphia Record; Wellington K. Barto, of the West Jersey Trust Company; Dr. Joseph Roberts, Cooper Hospital; William Clement, of the Clement Coverall Paint Company; Robert Wright, of the Haddonfield National Bank; Arthur J. Podmore, of the Camden Pottery Company; Nathan Leopold, Haddonfield druggist; Dr. J. Edgar Howard, of Haddonfield.

Dr. Alfred N. Elwell, of this city; Edward Preisendanz, Clarence Peters, N. Franks, of. Franks & Sweeney; U. G. Peters, Ralph D. Baker, prominent real estate man; Archibald Dingo, George Bachman, Sr., and George Bachman, Jr., Dr. O. W. Saunders, Henry Cooperson, Leon Cooperson, Herman Z. Cutler. Charles Bauman, Harry Rose, George Austermuhl, Walter Gulick, Albert Voeglin, Howard Fearn, John A. Schlorer, Ernest L. Bartelt.

William S. Casselman, George M. Carr, J. Price Myers, Carl R. Evered, former president of the Camden County Real Estate Board; Francis B. Wallen, former president of the Camden County Chamber of Commerce; William H. Alff, Edmund J. Alff, Harry Pelouze, Walter Campbell, Dr. Thomas R. Bunting, Joseph F. Kobus and Henry E. Kobus.

Enrollments, it was announced, may be made through the following committee of the league:

Ludwig A. Kind, Thomas Gordon Coulter, Charles H. Laird, Walter J. Staats, Frank C. Middleton, Jr., Frank J. Hineline, William T. Read, Charles S. Boyer, W. W. Robinson, George R. Pelouze, Paul A. Kind, Dr. Paul A. Mecray, Jerome Hurley, Harry A. Moran, James V. Moran, William J. Strandwitz, former Judge Lewis Starr and Frank C. Norcross.


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