George
Almon
Munger


George Munger

GEORGE ALMON MUNGER was born in Elkins Park PA on June 24, 1909 to Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Munger. He was a descendant of George A. Munger, who was a prominent Camden businessman, involved in lumber, real estate, and who founded the Munger & Long Department Store at Broadway and Federal Street. Shortly after his birth, the Munger family moved to 420 Cooper Street in Camden. Herbert Munger and his brother Clarence were at the time partnered in the department store with Elmer E. Long. 

George Almon Munger spent his early years in Camden, attending the local Friends School. His high school years were spent in Pennsylvania, where he starred in football, basketball, and track.

On January 19, 1938 George Munger was named head coach of the University of Pennsylvania football team. His 16 year career was quite successful, as he compiled a 52-7-4 record within the Ivy League, winning 84 games overall, and developed no less than 14 All-American players, including four-time All-American George Savitsky.

After George Almon retired as coach, he served for many years as the Penn athletic director, and Professor of Physical Education. After the 1953 season, Penn, as a new member of the Ivy League, decided to de-emphasize football, and the glory days of Penn football were over.

George Almon Munger passed away in 1994. 

The Maxwell Football Club in Philadelphia awards the annual George Munger Award for College Coach of the Year in his honor.


Camden Courier-Post - January 15, 1938
George
Almon
Munger

Camden Courier-Post - January 15, 1938
   
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Camden Courier-Post * February 23, 1938

 
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Woodrow Wilson High School - Joseph A. Varbalow - Clifford A. Baldwin
Thomas J. Daley - J. David Stern - J. William Markeim
Dr. Joseph E. Roberts - Frank M. Travaline Jr. - John H. Reiners Jr. 
Dr. Byron G. Tuttle -
Dr. David D. Helm - George Munger

George Munger

George MungerWhen World War I ended, George Almon Munger was a little boy.  But by the time World War II was over, Goerge Almon Munger was halfway to the Hall of Fame.

Munger took over as Penn's head football coach in 1939. He compiled a 52-7-4 Ivy League record over the next 16 years, creating a monstrous group of Quakers that left fans fighting for tickets at Franklin field, boosting Penn to the nation's top spot in football attendance.

Thanks to a single-wing offense and a disciplined defense, Penn would win the Ivy League's mythical title nine times during Munger's tenure and 16 players, including Chuck Bednarik and Reds Bagnell, would be named All-Americans.

While Munger coached at Penn, three of his players went on to win the Maxwell Award. They were: Robert H. Odell (1943), Charles (Chuck) Bednarik (1948) and Francis J. (Reds) Bagnell (1950).

"When I was 15, I knew I wanted to be a coach," Munger once said. He credited his high school coach, Lambert F. Whetstone, with installing that interest in him. Whetstone coached at Episcopal Academy, where Munger captained the football team in 1928 and 1929.

Episcopal just happened to win every game and a pair of Interac championships those two seasons. Munger added those titles to three others his teams won at Episcopal -- two in basketball and one in baseball. He knew his way around Episcopal's track as well, setting school records in the pole-vault, high jump, discus and javelin.

As a student-athlete at Penn, Munger starred as a half-back and fullback in the Quakers' backfield. But he carved his place into Franklin field lore by winning the decathlon at the 1931 Penn Relays.

After graduating from Penn in 1933, Munger returned to Episcopal to coach football and track and teach Math and Sacred Studies. He stayed there until 1936. That's when he went back to Penn to coach the Quakers' freshman track and football squads until he became head football coach three years later.

When his coaching career ended in 1954, Munger became director and professor of the University of Pennsylvania's Department of Physical Education.

Among George Almon Munger's countless awards is an honorary Doctors of Law Degree from his alma mater. In the presentation of that degree, the Trustees of the University of Pennsylvania called Munger "an angel with a single wing who soared into the record books."

The Maxwell Football Club honors that heavenly coach by making his coaching success, his devotion to ethics in athletics, and his commitment to education the standard for which all college coaches should strive.

Coach Munger passed away in 1994.


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