Ethan
P.
Wescott


ETHAN PRYOR WESCOTT was born in New Jersey in 1883 to John W. and Frances Oatman Wescott. His father, John W. Wescott, was a noted trial lawyer and judge. John W. Wescott was also known for having given both of President Woodrow Wilson's nominating addresses.  One was at the Democratic Convention in Baltimore on June 27, 1912, and the other at the Democratic Convention in St. Louis MO on June 10, 1916. Afterwards, when he was Attorney General of New Jersey he wrote a book on the events in Woodrow Wilson's life. 

Ethan P. Wescott grew up in Haddonfield NJ, where his family owned a home at 43 Chestnut Street. After completing his education and passing the bar, following his father into the legal profession. By January of 1920 he had married, and was living wife wife Edna and daughter Catherine at 730 Park Avenue in Collingswood NJ. A son, John, was born shortly afterward. The Wescott family was still in Collingswood as of the 1930 Census. 

Ethan P. Wescott had a long career a a lawyer. In the 1920s he and Joseph A. Varbalow partnered in a law firm. He was Camden County Prosecutor in the late 1920s. His brother Ralph W. Wescott served as a member of the Delaware River Port Authority. After retiring from the practice of law in the 1930s, he went into the dairy business.  

Ethan P. Wescott Was active in fraternal and Masonic afiars, including the Junior Order of American Mechanics, teh Improved Order of Red Men, and Camden Lodge 293 of the Elks. He passed away in 1954. He was buried at the family plot at Harleigh Cemetery in Camden NJ, where he rests with his father and other family members. 


South Jersey
A History 1664-1924

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Trenton Evening Times - March 7, 1927
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Harry Bentley - Joseph Curry - William Juliano - Frank Doris - Harry M. Cooper
Olney Bank & Trust - William O. Miller - Lawrence T. Doran - Ethan Wescott
Matthew Overnack - C. Stuart Patterson 

Camden Evening Courier - January 16, 1928

MURDER MOTIVE AT G.O.P. CLUB SPLITS SLEUTHS 
County Detectives Contend Philadelphia Gangster
Was Slain in Quarrel Over Woman
POLICE CLAIM HOLD-UP ATTEMPT CAUSED FIGHT
Deven Charged With Crime, Flannery and Taxi Driver Held Without Bail

With city and county authorities definitely divided on the motive and circumstance if the Sixth Ward Republican Club slaying, Joseph "Polack Joe" Deven was arraigned in Camden police court today and held without bail on a murder charge.

Through County Solicitor Walter Keown, retained as his attorney, Deven waived a police court hearing and was held to await grand jury action in the slaying of Joseph Cimini, Philadelphia gangster, at the political club early Saturday morning.

At the same time County Prosecutor Ethan P. Wescott announced his operatives had abandoned the theory Cimini was killed as the aftermath of an attempted hold-up, and were concentrating their investigation in the case on an effort to "find the woman'.

Statements of witnesses to the fatal shooting, the prosecutor added, made no mention of a hold-up, but contained the declaration that Cimini had been shot as a result of a feud with Charles "Chick" Hunt, former South Camden pugilist, concerning the affection of "Chick's girl". 

Police Claim Holdup

On the other hand, Captain John Golden, chief of the city detective bureau, declared he was unable to recall any mention of a girl in the statements obtained from witnesses, and added emphatically that his department still held the shooting had followed an attempted holdup of the club by Cimini and Joseph 'Mose’ Flannery.

Flannery and Hunt were both witnesses to the shooting by Deven, picturesque figure in Third Ward politics, which occurred at the Sixth Ward Club's headquarters, 908 Broadway..

After Deven had appeared in Police Court today, Flannery was arraigned as a material witness and as an accessory to the crime, with an additional charge accusing him of carrying concealed deadly weapons. Similar charges were made against Russell Sage, a taxicab driver, who arrived at the club with Flannery and Cimini early Saturday morning. These two were committed to the county jail without any bail by Judge Bernard Bertman

Hunt, however, was released under $1,000 bail as was Martin O'Brien, 27 years old, a former New Jersey State Trooper, and Harry Waterhouse, 28 years old, 1102 Marion street.

Three Others Arrested

During the day the police continued to build up their case against Flannery by arraigning him on the charges made by Milton Feinstein and Henry Mehrer. The also arrested Joseph Genther, 29 years old, 414 Atlantic Avenue; Robert Wolfe, 21 years old, 1106 Mechanic Street, and Eli Conaghy, 27 years old, 814 South 6th Street. Wolfe, who is Flannery's brother-in-law, and Genther were held "on suspicion" of having been with "Mose" at the time the latter is declared to have attacked and attempted to rob Mehrer, an Audubon policeman, outside the Ringside Inn, on the Black Horse Pike.

Conaghy, Flannery and Sage were arraigned and held without bail on charges of threatening to kill Feinstein and of carrying concealed deadly weapons. Feinstein declares these three with Cimini, the slain man, entered his cafe on January 2 and attempted to hold him up, threatening to kill him if he refused to “come across”. When he defied them by telling them to “go ahead and shoot”, Feinstein says, they departed.

Wolfe, Genther, and Conaghy were arrested by City Detectives George Ward and Thomas Cheeseman. It was Cheeseman who lodged the formal complaint of murder against Deven.

Two Others Released

Two other men who were questioned in connection with the murder case were in court this man but neither was held. They are Newton Blanchard, 923 St. John Street, a former boxing referee and alleged “stick man” at the crap game declared to have been in progress at the club before the shooting, and Michael Dandrea, 26 years old, of 1657 Norris Street. Both men had been released after questioning on Saturday. Police say they are the men who told police that trouble was imminent at the club and that “Flannery and another fellow are trying to stick up a bunch of other fellows.”

The city police hold-up theory was further attacked today by Francis J. McCarthy, a Philadelphian, who arrived before noon at the county prosecutor’s office and said he would co-operate with the authorities. He wishes to clear the dead man, he said, of the stigma of suspicion that he was slain while engaged in an attempted robbery.

Hearing in Police Court was brief. There was no testimony and Keown merely announced Deven would waive a hearing. Appearing also as attorney for Hunt, O’Brien, and Waterhouse, he said the other three men were “present at the unfortunate shooting” and thus should be held as material witnesses. He added the prosecutor’s office had permitted the release of the three under $1,000 bail each and requested Judge Bertman follow suit. The court acceded to this request but stipulated that new bail must be provided. The three men were freed shortly afterward when the bond was furnished by James Louis, 603 Kaighn Avenue, who had provided the bail yesterday in the prosecutor’s office.

Despite the declaration by two Camden district detectives who were present at the time and who said there was no evidence that gambling was in progress at the club, county detectives disclosed today that statements of the shooting contained the assertion that the men had gathered for a crap game.

These witnesses also declared the fatal shooting resulted from an argument over a woman for whose attention Cimini and Hunt were rivals.

In circles where the leading figures in the shooting move, it was freely predicted things would be fixed up for Deven and that Flannery, political worker and supposed gangster, was to be "made the goat".

Flannery is blamed by the city police for precipitating the battle. he has also been identified, according to County Detective Howard Smith, as one of the men who beat and robbed Henry Mehrer, an Audubon policeman, outside the Ringside Inn on the Black Horse Pike a fortnight ago. In addition, he is charges with attempting to hold up Milton Feinstein, cafe proprietor, 508 Kaighn Avenue. Cimini and Sage were also identified by Feinstein, according to Detective Smith.

According to the version of Cimini's death given in statements by witnesses to county detectives, "Chick" Hunt might have been the victim of the slaying had it not been for Deven's interference.

Gamble Over Affections

Like actors in a carefully-rehearsed drama, the various witnesses to the shooting made their statements nearly twelve hours after the shooting and, both city and county detectives say they agreed in all important aspects. Prosecutor Wescott declared, however, that no mention of an attempted hold-up was made despite the fact that City Detectives Clarence Arthur and Clarence Bunker- before whose eyes Cimini was shot down- stated Flannery and Cimini were holding the other men at bay when the detectives entered the room.

Instead, the statements of the witnesses described the scene as a dramatic gamble, with death as the stake, over the affections of a woman beloved by both Cimini and Hunt. This woman, who is married and estranged from her husband, is being sought today, Prosecutor Wescott said. According to detectives, Hunt was severely beaten last Wednesday night in a downtown gambling place by members of Cimini’s gang. Cimini, known also as Joseph Gannon, was a brother of William Cimini, a pugilist known in the ring as Billy Gannon.

The stories told by the witnesses place Hunt as one of the players in the crap game which was in progress at the club on Saturday morning. Deven was at the window, looking out, according to the witnesses, when he saw a taxicab draw up in front of the building. Flannery, Cimini and Sage descended and entered the club, it was declared.

“Here comes Mose, Chick, with that guy what’s gunnin’ for you” Deven is declared to have shouted.

A dozen gamesters fled from the room. “Chick” and a few of his friends held their ground and were waiting when the trio entered. Cimini, it is stated, walked over to Hunt.

“I told you,” he said with a sneer, “to stay away from that dame. She’s my girl. You were warned and sow you gotta take your medicine..”

Hunt said nothing.

Flannery drew from his pockets two automatics and flung them on the green-topped table, the stories go.

“C’mon, Chick,” he said. Don’t be yella. He toldja about the broad and he toldja what he’d do. Take your gun and shoot it out.”

“Chick” demurred.

“I don’t want none of that stuff, Mose,” he pleaded. He eyed Cimini carefully as the latter held one hand on the butt of a pistol which protruded from his belt.

Deven Interferes

Hunt made no careless movements toward the pistols on the table. Then Deven is declared to have interfered.

“None of that stuff, Mose” he said warningly. “Who’s this guy to come here making trouble? He’s no member, is he?”

Cimini moved quickly, the witnesses say. With an upward flip of his hand he brought the barrel of the automatic sharply against Deven’s chin. The latter lurched forward snatching one of the pistol from the table.

The weapon was discharged, the bullet tearing through Cimini’s heart. He died instantly.

The next moment, Arthur and Bunker, district detectives summoned by one of the players who had fled, burst through the door and lined up the men against the wall.

A short time later police arrested Blanchard and Dandrea. Blanchard, police say, was the man who gave them warning of the impending battle. Both men were released after questioning.

Released from Lakeland

The detectives found Deven cringing with fear under the table, the weapon still in his hand. Four other pistols were picked up in different parts of the room.

Deven was identified as a lovesick husband who appeared in the prosecutor’s office several month’s ago and asked to be “put away”. His wife had left him, he said, and he was afraid he might harm someone.

He was committed to the asylum at Lakeland. When or how he was released is a mystery. Lakeland officials said they had no record of him. Deven once shot himself in a suicide attempt police say, in grief over estrangement from his wife.

Gangdom’s prevailing opinion is that Flannery is “in” for it. Attempts and threats against the blond gangster’s life have furnished many lurid tales for the habitués of downtown hangouts.

Further, Flannery has made many bitter enemies through his political activities. In the last election he worked as a Democrat against “Mikey” Brown in the Eighth Ward. His overbearing tactics and bravado among the other downtown characters has increased the feeling against him, it is said.

Thus far, he has succeeded in keeping out of the toils for any length of time. His police record includes arrests for rum-running, carrying concealed weapons, alleged ballot frauds and attempted murder. His most recent arrest came in Philadelphia when he figured in a pistol battle in which a man was slain.


Camden Courier-Post - January 28, 1928

Patrons, Patronesses Announced Today for First Military Ball

Patrons and patronesses for the first military ball of the Camden Post No. 960, Veterans of Foreign Wars, to be held on Friday evening February 3 in the Elks auditorium, Seventh and Cooper Streets., are announced today.

The following prominent men and women are listed: Mrs. J.W. Connor, Miss C.M. Day, Mrs. J.H. Forsyth, Mrs. H.J. Goodyear, Miss B. Graham, Mrs. R.E. Green, Mrs. E.F. Haines, Mrs. J. Hood Jr., Mrs. W. Hurley, Mrs. J. Jarrell, Mrs. T. Keefe, Mrs. J.F. Kobus, Mrs. L. Liberman, Mrs. F.L. Lloyd, Mrs. M.A. Logan, Mrs. T.P. McConaghy, Mrs. F.F. Neutze, Mrs. L.K. Marr, Mrs. J.A. Pennington, Mrs. M.E. Ramsey, Mrs. E. Truax, Mrs. S.M. Shay, Mrs. W.J. Staats, Mrs. B.G. Tarburton, Mrs. R.W. Waddell, Mrs. E. Watson, Mrs. E.P. Wescott, Mrs. C.A. Wolverton. 

David Baird Jr., William T. Boyle, Isaac Ferris, William Hurley, John Hood Jr., John Jarrell, Victor King, William J. Kraft, Thomas Keefe, Joseph F. Kobus, Hon. Edmund B. Leaming, Dr. A. Haines Lippincott, James H. Long, L.K. Marr, Dr. Thomas P. McConaghy, Hon. Frank F. Neutze, Samuel P. Orlando, Albert E. Simmons, Edwin Watson, Ethan P. Wescott.


Camden Courier-Post - January 31, 1928

JUDGE SHAY TO BE NEXT PROSECUTOR

Camden Trenton Bureau

Trenton, Jan. 31- The name of Judge Samuel M. Shay, of the Camden County Court of Common Pleas, has been handed to Governor Moore as the choice of the Camden Democratic organization for prosecutor, succeeding Ethan Wescott.

The name was submitted to Governor Moore last night by a delegation of Camden Democrats, headed by Edward J. Kelleher.

That Governor Moore will send the nomination to the State Senate appears certain, and it not likely that any serious objection will be raised in that body, inasmuch as Judge Shay’s reputation is of the highest and he has been twice before confirmed for the judgeship by the Senate.  

Sees Drastic Changes

The choice of Judge Shay was a big surprise in state Democratic ranks, and started a flurry of speculation. If Judge Shay is appointed to the prosecutorship it will leave a vacancy on the bench of the Court of Common Pleas. Although the Camden Democrats are said to be a unit in supporting Shay and also on the other changes they contemplate, no definite word leaked out as to who will be Shay’s successor on the bench.

Judge Shay’s appointment as prosecutor, it was said by Camden Democrats who were here last night,  mean drastic changes to the personnel of the Camden Prosecutor’s office. One of the rumors in effect is that District Court Judge Frank F. Neutze will be elevated to the County judgeship and that Prosecutor Wescott will succeed Neutze. It is also rumored that Judge Shay’s present post may go to either former Judge William T. Boyle or former Judge William C. French. Both Boyle and French formerly held the county judgeship position.

Another rumor is that Samuel P. Orlando will be named first assistant prosecutor and that either Francis G. Homan or Lawrence Gregorio, the incumbent will be named second assistant prosecutor.

The names at former Police Judge John T. Cleary and Assistant Prosecutor Joseph A. Varbalow also figure in the rumor. Cleary has been mentioned as first assistant prosecutor several times.

Term is 5 Years

Judge Shay is now serving his second term as Judge. He was reappointed for a five-year tenure of office last March. The term of the prosecutor’s office also is five years.

The proposed changes are said to be steps toward a complete reorganization of the Democratic party In South Jersey.

State Senator Joseph H. Forsyth, whose ‘O. K.’ is necessary before the appointment of Judge  Shay could become official, under the “Senatorial courtesy rule” would not comment on the situation here today.

Interviewed in the Senate Chamber prior to the opening of today’s session, Senator Forsyth refused to admit that Governor Moore had sent for him last night and had discussed the appointment of Judge  Shay. Forsyth's answer, however, indicated that he had been in conference with the Governor on the subject last night.

“I have not made up my mind as to my attitude on the nomination of Judge Shay,” Senator Forsyth said. “I want to take up the matter with the Governor first. I do not think it would be proper to give my decision to the newspapers before I discuss the matter with the Governor.”

Headed by Assistant Prosecutor Lawrence Gregorio, County Detective Frank Cocchilaraley and Justice of the Peace Jack O’Grady, a delegation of Camden Democrats were scheduled to arrive in Trenton this afternoon for a conference with Governor Moore in the interest of Prosecutor Wescott.

O’Grady stated he will present letters from the Bricklayers and Iron­workers Unions urging the reappointment of Wescott. Cocchiaraley is heading a group of South Camden Italians who are also favoring the reappointment of Wescott. 


Camden
Courier-Post

February 10, 1928

Camden Courier-Post - February 28, 1928

BANK EMBEZZLER JOKES WHEN TAKEN TO COUNTY PRISON
Garrett Waives Reading of Indictment for $19000 Systematic Thefts;
His Wife Remains Loyal, Discrediting His Confession

Laughing at photographers who tried to snap a picture as he covered his face with his hat and joking with the officers who accompanied him, Burd S. Garrett, for seven years a teller employed by the East End Trust Company was taken from the West Jersey Hospital this morning at 11:15 to the County Courthouse.

When arraigned before Justice of the Peace Peter J. Wallace in the office of Lawrence T. Doran, chief of county detectives he waived reading and hearing of the complaint charging him with embezzlement of $19,000 of the bank’s funds.

Less than ten minutes after he had entered Chief Doran's office, the confessed embezzler, accompanied by Detective William Cleary, reappeared and walked to the county jail where he was committed .

Prosecutor Ethan P. Wescott did not attend the arraignment and it was expected that he would set Garrett's bail sometime this afternoon, when he would announce his intentions as to presentment of the case to the grand jury.

Garrett, who according to Assistant Prosecutor Joseph A. Varbalow admitted manipulation of the bank funds, which he lavished on his wife and the six children he had instructed from birth in the principles of honesty, appeared unmoved this morning by the proceedings.

His face has regained the color it had lost when detectives first began questioning him, as he lay in a coma on a cot at the hospital last Saturday. Since Sunday afternoon, when he broke down and admitted the charges against him, he has chatted with his constable guard.

 Garrett’s appearance today was that of a businessman in comfortable circumstances. He was well dress, in a gray suit, dark overcoat, and wore a light gray soft felt hat His eyes, behind tortoise shell glasses, were bright, and minus the stare of three days ago. 

His wife, despite his reported confession reiterated her belief today that “it can’t be true.” Firmly declaring that she used economic measures in her housekeeping


Camden Courier-Post - April 05, 1928

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...continued...
Samuel M. Shay - Joseph A. Varbalow
6th Ward Republican Club
"Polack Joe" Devon - Walter Keown
Ethan P. Wescott

Camden Courier-Post - April 5, 1928

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Joseph H. Forsyth - Samuel M. Shay - Ethan Wescott

Camden Courier-Post - September 20, 1928

ORLANDO AFTER SLOT MACHINE 'RACKET' CHIEF
Assistant Prosecutor to Get Higher-ups in Distribution Plan
13 GAMBLING DEVICES TAKEN BY DETECTIVES
Grand Jury Today Gets Evidence in Surprise Raids

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Samuel P. Orlando - Ethan P. Wescott - Samuel M. Shay - Lawrence T. Doran - D. Auletto
Peter Bernardo - Earl Sanderson - Max Beals - Betty Leopold - Frank Delgarzo
Antonio Auduint - South 2nd Street - South 3rd Street - South 8th Street - Line Street
Clinton Street - Mickle Street - Spruce Street - Stevens Street

The Lancaster Daily Eagle - Lancaster OH - October 22, 1928

Camden Courier-Post - February 9, 1933

JOE MONTANA WED TO MISS PALLADINO
Camden Wrestler and Bride
Are Are Given Dinner Attended by Notables

Miss Emma Palladino, one of the fairest daughters of Camden's "Little Italy" yesterday became the bride of Joseph Montana, heavyweight wrestler, at Our Lady of Mt. Carmel Church, Fourth and Division streets.

Idol of Italian youth in this city Montana was hailed by hundreds of them outside the church. A number of relatives and friends, including prominent figures in the legal and professional life of the city, attended a dinner in honor of the couple at Overbrook Villa, Lindenwold, following the ceremony.  

The bride, 20, is the daughter

of Joseph Palladino, commercial photographer of 1115 South Fourth street. She graduated from Camden High school in 1928. Montana is 26 and a contender for the world's heavy-weight wrestling diadem. Following a wedding tour through the West the couple plan to reside in Camden.

Miss Emenia D' Alesio, of Audubon, and Miss Rose Marini and Miss Cecelia Szymanski, of Camden, served as bridesmaids. Attending the groom were Gene Mariano, Michel D'Ilesia and William Palladino. The bride carried a bouquet of lillies of the valley and white roses while her attendants held tulips and roses. The church was beautifully decorated with varied floral designs, gold ribbons, silks and satins.

The guest list at the bridal dinner included: Assemblyman Frank M. Travaline, Jr., City Commissioner Clay W. Reesman, director of parks and public property; Acting Chief of Police of John W. Golden, former Prosecutor and Mrs. Ethan P. Wescott, Samuel P. Orlando, Guido Laurini, Detective Fiore Troncone, Antonio Mecca, Mr. and Mrs. William Denof, Mr. and Mrs. Pasquale Ianuzzi, Frank H. Ryan, Thomas H. Ryan, Dr. and Mrs. Robert Principato, Mr. and Mrs. William AveraIl, Luke McKenna, Mr. and Mrs. Gene Mariani, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Abbott, Frank P. Cocchiaraley and Miss Regina Cocchiaraley, all of Camden; Miss Mary Montana, and Mr. and Mrs. Ettore Montana, of Columbus OH., and Aristadino D'Guilia and sons, Albert and Peter, of Buffalo, NY.


Camden
Courier-Post

February 10, 1928

Camden Courier-Post - October 26, 1936

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The
Wescott Family Plot
at
Harleigh Cemetery
Camden NJ

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